Livestock pest economic geography

Published on 10 September 2012

Research Areas

Countries

Timeline

Start Date: 1 January 2012 | End Date: 31 December 2013

Overview

The Livestock Pest Economic Geography project works to better understand the spatially-explicit economic costs of livestock pests and diseases and our capacity to ameliorate their impacts.

The first goal of the project is to identify the top 20 or so disease/vector systems of economic importance in each of four livestock categories in Africa: cattle, sheep and goats, pigs, and poultry.

We will collate information from all of the expert lists that we can access, and use a citation search to determine which pest/disease systems have received the most research attention since 2000.

From these ranked lists, we will produce distribution maps to indicate presence or implied absence in each country of the pest/disease systems that rank highest in each of the four livestock categories.

This information will then be juxtaposed against spatially explicit measures of livestock and human geographies and disease impacts to help identify the prima facie importance of each disease within each country. This analysis will be published, and the atlas of maps will be made available online.

The 20 or so livestock pest/vector systems deemed likely to cause the largest economic losses in this first phase will be given more intensive study in a second phase of the project, where we will more formally address the bio-economic issues of relevance.

In early 2013 we plan to bring together relevant experts on livestock pests and diseases for a workshop to identify additional sources of data and technical information of prospective use for our analysis, and to critically review future research priorities and strategies.

The ultimate goal is to develop a robust, spatially explicit modeling approach rooted in technical and economic realities and combined with improved data (and data estimation methods), to enable more evidenced-based decision-making about strategic research and other intervention options designed to economically reduce the losses from livestock pests and diseases throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

Scientists

  • Darren Kriticos
  • Delia Grace
  • Jason Beddow
  • Jusper Kiplimo
  • Pamela Ochungo
  • Philip Pardey
  • Tania Yonow

Partners

  • HarvestChoice – University of Minnesota
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

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