Increasing food security and household income through small stock market development in Zimbabwe

Published on 24 April 2011

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Timeline

Start Date: 10 December 2010 | End Date: 31 December 2011

Overview

The project aims to increase food security and incomes for small-scale farmers by commercializing the livestock sector through the creation of efficient market systems.Target group are the smallholder farmers in Matabeleland South. Because an overwhelming majority of households own goats the project ensures that the poorer sectors of the population benefit. A focus on goats ensures that the project benefits women farmers and vulnerable groups such as child-headed households.Food security at the household level can be improved in these areas if the high rates of goat mortalities can be curbed and farmers are able to sell these animals at well functioning markets for good prices. While goat keepers are the main target group, other beneficiaries include the value chain (VC) players (input and output), local authorities and the small entrepreneurs selling their produce at livestock sale pens.  They will have the opportunity to benefit from exploring new markets, fostering closer relationships with clients and improving their efficiency by marketing their products through more targeted strategies. Although policy makers are not directly targeted by the project, outputs from this project will provide crucial information on the impact of market development on food security and income growth, as well as providing very specific information to guide future policies for small stock sector. 

Smallholder farmers in Matabeleland South; there are approximately 91,000 households in Matabeleland South (Zimbabwe National Census, 2002). Because an overwhelming majority of households own goats the project ensures that the poorer sectors of the population benefit. A focus on goats ensures that the project benefits women farmers and vulnerable groups such as child-headed households.

Food security at the household level can be improved in these areas if the high rates of goat mortalities can be curbed and farmers are able to sell these animals at well functioning markets for good prices. If each of the M1,03 households in Zimbabwe sells one more goat per annum than before, that would place a million more goats, representing USD 20,000,000, on the market. This can be achieved through improved feed and animal health systems.

While goat keepers are the main target group, other beneficiaries include the value chain (VC) players (input and output), local authorities and the small entrepreneurs selling their produce at livestock sale pens.  They will have the opportunity to benefit from exploring new markets, fostering closer relationships with clients and improving their efficiency by marketing their products through more targeted strategies. NARS and development organizations will increase the efficiency of extension and support services as a result of the IP, FFS, and strengthened farmer-based organizations. 

 Although policy makers are not directly targeted by the project, outputs from this project will provide crucial information on the impact of market development on food security and income growth, as well as providing very specific information to guide future policies for small stock sector. 

 

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