Ongoing Research Projects Report

Country: All
Research Area: All
Center: All
Timeframe: any start date to any end date
ID Title Lead Center Start Date Planned End Date Overview Countries Related MTPs Research Partners Research Areas Principal Investigator Scientists
2111 Surveillance and early-warning systems for climate-sensitive diseases in Vietnam and Laos International Livestock Research Institute  2015-01-01  2018-12-31  Overview A warmer, wetter world is likely to be sicker. The Mekong is a hotspot for human, animal and plant disease, and some of the most important are highly sensitive to climate and climate changes. These diseases impose enormous burdens on human health and the agricultural sector and hinder broader development. Better tackling of climate-sensitive disease requires better information and tools. We identify a portfolio of climate-based information systems that target important diseases and are used successfully in other countries, using action research to adapt them for Vietnam and Laos and ensuring delivery through partnerships. The expected outcome of the project is farming communities are able to take practical action to reduce disease risk and/or benefit from risk-mitigating action by health providers. The impacts are better health, reduced economic loss from disease, increased food security and ecosystems protected from disease spillover and misuse of agricultural chemicals. Project outcome statement The research portfolio consists of surveillance and early-warning systems successfully used elsewhere targeted to important climate-sensitive diseases in Vietnam and Laos. We will build capacity in using these systems through existing partnerships ensuring outcomes. These include the following: The national task force on food safety in Vietnam, supported by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), will use hot spot maps for targeting surveillance and use of climate-based tools in its training and sensitization, in particular on leptospirosis and Japanese encephalitis. Rubber farmers in Laos will get mobile Climate Forecast and Advice messages based on information from 20 sets of auto-meteorological stations pledged by the National Climate Center in China who will also provide capacity building and training in their use. Thousands of health officers and farmers trained by a World Bank project in disease surveillance/reporting in Vietnam will form the core of the participatory disease surveillance and response system. They will send information and receive advice on climate-sensitive disease from model predictions and global platforms. In Laos, the network of primary animal health workers trained by the non-governmental organization Veterinarians without Borders will play a similar role. Unlike other tools, mycotoxin forecasting has so far only been used in developed countries. While adapting the tool we will explore delivery and outcome pathways with our partners. Project activities The project has five activities which will be undertaken by five teams. Developing and disseminating maps of hot spots of climate-sensitive animal and zoonotic diseases and Vietnam and Laos Developing and piloting a real-time prediction system for Japanese encephalitis and leptospirosis in people and animals in Vietnam and Laos Exploring the potential for weather-based forecasting for aflatoxin mitigation Climate service and early warning system for rubber plantations in northern Laos Dissemination and application of developed tools of pest forecast Partners Agrifood Research Finland Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Vietnam National University of Agriculture World Agroforestry Centre Funder CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Laos, Vietnam      Climate Change, Livestock  Hung Nguyen-Viet  Delia Grace 
2110 mPig: Mobile SMS learning for pigs – An innovative information sharing platform for smallholder pig value chain actors in Uganda International Livestock Research Institute  2015-01-01  2016-12-31  The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) identified the pig sector in Uganda as one of nine livestock systems worldwide where research investments are most likely to make a major difference to the livelihoods and diets of poor people. Since 2012, the CGIAR Research Programs Livestock and Fish and on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health have been conducting research on the performance of the pig value chain and the challenges and opportunities for enhancing the pork sector. This project supports the CGIAR Research Project on Livestock and Fish by piloting innovative methods to disseminate information to pig value chain actors to increase pig growth and reproductive performance on farm, improve market access for poor value chain actors and ultimately improve food security through increased pork production. The project supports the CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health through applications on pig zoonoses, production of safe pork and improved human nutrition. The research will directly build on work by the two CGIAR Research Programs targeting pro-poor smallholder pig value chains in Uganda and funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, Irish Aid and BMZ (through the Safe Food Fair Food project). The project also links farmers, traders, butchers and consumers to the information platform, thereby greatly enhancing the probability of success and ultimate development impact. Partners Freie Universitaet Berlin Vétérinaires sans Frontières - Germany Funder Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) Uganda      Livestock  Kristina Roesel  Delia Grace, Edwin Kimani, Florence Mutua, Michel Dione 
2060 Addressing bovine tuberculosis at the human-animal interface and veterinary antibiotic use in smallholder peri-urban dairy farms in India to ensure safe and sustainable milk production International Livestock Research Institute  2014-04-01  2018-03-31  Peri-urban areas on the fringes of cities in India have witnessed rapid and unsystematic growth in recent years. In response to increased demand for food, traditional agricultural practices have been supplemented by highly intensified, industrial-style production units, often in peri-urban areas. Agriculture intensification poses significant public health risks, including the potential for zoonotic disease transmission, the emergence of new diseases and the overuse of veterinary antibiotics, which contributes to the development of antibiotic resistance in pathogens affecting humans and animals. The peri-urban ecosystem in India provides a relevant environment for addressing the challenges of zoonotic diseases and for promoting synergies between health, environment protection and development. This is a research initiative at the peri-urban human-animal-environment interface for improved local healthy food production, healthy livestock and enhanced public health. Two major research projects will form an initial basis of the research initiative’s activities: the first focuses on the zoonotic potential of bovine tuberculosis and the second on antibiotic use in peri-urban smallholder dairy farms as risky and unsustainable means of increasing food output. Each of the studies will culminate into proofs of concept of changed incentives and better practices. These initial research projects in the peri-urban ecosystem will provide a basis for expanding the work of the initiative to identify and address other key development and public health issues in this setting. General objective The general objective is to contribute to stronger evidence-based cross-sector policy and local capacity for integrating public health and livestock health, urban planning, local food production and social development in peri-urban settings of India. Specific objectives The specific objectives are to: Establish a policy-relevant research program within an India research initiative on peri-urban human-animal-environment interface housed at the Public Health Foundation of India. Generate evidence and improved understanding of interactions between disease risk, livestock and human health and sustainable development in different types of peri-urban settings of the country. Influence the coordination of policy and practice that supports safe food production, healthy livestock and improved public health. Create and maintain sustainable multidisciplinary and multi-actor partnerships for policy-relevant research aiming at decreasing health and environmental problems from livestock agriculture and overcrowded conditions in peri-urban ecosystems. Study sites Bangalore, Guwahati and Mumbai Donor International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Partner Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) India      Livestock  Manish Kakkar  Delia Grace, Johanna Lindahl, Purvi Mehta 
2050 Low Emissions Development Strategies (LEDS) in Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2013-04-15  2013-09-30  Colombia      Climate Change  Bernardo Creamer   
2047 Strengthening Partnerships for Innovation in Beans, Groundnuts and Sesame Research and Technology Transfer in Mozambique Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-10-01  2013-09-30  The project will develop and disseminate proven technologies through partnership and participatory approaches to increase productivity of beans in order to increase rural household income, reduce poverty and enhance food and nutrition security of resource poor farmers, especially women. The project will test and identify locally adapted and high-yielding varieties of beans that are drought tolerant in the face of climate variability and pest and disease resistant to minimize yield losses in the field. It proposes to develop and scale-up appropriate crop and soil fertility management practices across agro-ecologies and among rural communities. Mozambique      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Rowland Chirwa   
2045 Profitable and Sustainable Nutrient Management System for Eastern and Southern African Farming Systems with particular reference to conservation agriculture in SIMLESA research sites Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2013-02-27  2013-05-31  This study is targeting the delivery of a significant soil nutrition research analysis report and ideas for new research by 30 May 2013:A synthesis of the Eastern and Southern Africa situation in terms of past experiences, present and future opportunities in promoting nutrients use in Africa; A synthesis from a workshop between industry, policy and science; A framework of outputs and activities describing multi-disciplinary research Mozambique      Soils  Rolf Sommer   
2044 Transforming Key Production Systems: Maize Mixed East and Southern Africa “Identification of the key biophysical production constraints to crops and livestock at farm and landscape levels” Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2013-01-01  2013-09-30  Identification of the key biophysical production constraints to crops and livestock at farm and landscape levels: Apply novel approaches to characterize the biophysical production constraints and identify priority areas for targeted interventions Botswana, Burundi, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Livestock, Soils  Job Kihara   
2043 BREAD: Fast breeding for slow crops: doubled haploids in cassava and banana Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-07-01  2013-06-30  This project aims to: Produce doubled haploids in cassava and banana/plantain using centromere engineering Produce Agrobacterium binary vectors to replace endogenous CENH3 with altered variants in cassava and banana Create transgenic cassava and banana lines expressing altered CENH3 proteins in place of endogenous CENH3 (putative haploid inducers). Cross putative haploid inducing lines to wild-type cassava and banana, and assay for haploid progeny Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Paul Chavarriaga   
2041 Innovative programmatic approach to climate change in support of BecA’s mission: Climate-smart Brachiaria grases for improving livestock production in East Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-11-22  2015-12-31  The main goal of the program is to contribute to food and feed security and poverty reduction in East Africa through climate-smart Brachiaria grasses and to facilitate germplasm transfer and capacity building in improved tropical forage technology, natural resource management and adaptation and mitigation of climate change. The overall objective of the program is to increase feed availability in action areas of the target countries in East Africa by use of climate-smart Brachiaria grasses for increased animal productivity and for generation of extra income to smallholder famers by 2015. Specific Objectives: 1. To determine the role of endophytes in improving adaptation of Brachiaria grasses to climate change (drought) and to develop novel methods to detect endophytes 2. To quantify the contribution of drought and low soil fertility adapted Brachiaria grasses to mitigation of climate change 3. To integrate improved Brachiaria grasses in mixed smallholder crop-livestock systems and determine their role in improving milk and meat production in grazing and cut-and carry forage systems while reducing land degradation 4. To facilitate the creation of forage seed production enterprises with guaranteed markets among smallholder farmers. Burundi, Chad, Congo Dem. Rep., Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock  Idupulapati Rao  Michael Peters 
2040 Improving nitrogen use efficiency of crops and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2013-04-01  2014-03-31  This project aims to identify QTL for Nitrogen Use Efficiency trait, particularly biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) in Brachiaria and to assess the benefit of BNI trait in cropping system; and to develop a cassava network in Asia to strengthen collaborative research on molecular breeding, seed system and capacity building for cassava improvement. Colombia, Japan      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Manabu Ishitani   
2039 Supporting the Workshop of China and CIAT Collaboration in Projects Initiation Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-01-01  2013-12-31  China      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Joseph Tohme   
2038 Development of “Nebraska” Farm as a Research Platform for Generation of New Crop Varieties and Cropping Systems Adapted to the Stressful Soils of Eastern and Southern Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-05-01  2014-04-30  Botswana, Burundi, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
2032 What is killing my cow? Re-assessing diseases in smallholder dairying in Tanzania International Livestock Research Institute  2013-05-01  2014-04-30  The goal of this project is to provide an evidence base for prioritizing dairy animal and public health research and targeting development interventions to promote pro-poor smallholder dairy value chains in Tanzania. This work is being carried out under the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish, led by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), and the CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) which is led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). ILRI leads the agriculture-associated diseases theme of A4NH. ILRI and its partners initiated a major engagement in Tanzania to generate solutions and evidence for the development at scale of pro-poor smallholder dairy value chains. Activities from several donor-funded projects are being integrated to characterize the current institutional context and technical challenges, and to begin evaluating options that will allow emerging dairy farmers and actors along informal milk marketing chains to improve their productivity and livelihoods, while increasing the supply of milk and the critical nutrients it contains to their communities and nearby urban centres. Objective The overall objective of the project is to assess the presence of a range of potential pathogens (production diseases and zoonoses) in smallholder dairy cattle in two research sites in Tanzania (Morogoro and Tanga) based on an in-depth diagnostic examination of serological and milk samples. As the project develops, an additional satellite project is being initiated to explore the effectiveness of different communication mechanisms for smallholder cattle farmers in Tanzania. Expected outcomes An exhaustive inventory of pathogens found in a sample of dairy cattle from the two research sites Prevalence estimates for a range of key dairy cattle diseases (including production diseases and zoonoses) in these sites An assessment of the reliability of disease information collected through questionnaires and participatory epidemiology techniques At least one joint peer-reviewed publication, with findings also disseminated locally Partner institutions Landeslabor Berlin-Brandenburg Sokoine University of Agriculture Funders CGIAR Irish Aid The Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Germany Tanzania      Livestock  Fred Unger  Delia Grace, Silvia Alonso, Tarni Cooper 
2024 Join actions and resources for contributing to developing a sustainable use strategy of forage resources in livestock systems in Mexico Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-09-16  2013-04-30  Mexico      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock  Michael Peters  Michael Peters 
2019 Study of economic impacts of climate change in Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-09-27  2013-09-10  The main objective ofthis project is to develop a study of economic impacts of climate change in Colombia on three sectors: Livestock, Biodiversity and ecosystem services, and Water resources Colombia      Climate Change  Jeimar A. Tapasco A.  Jeimar A. Tapasco A. 
2017 Altillanura Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-06-07  2012-12-30  Join efforts, resources, capacities, and technology between the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Corpoica, and CIAT, with the aim to implement technology transfer research projects that will allow to strengthen production systems in the high plains region, within the framework of the National Agricultural Science, Technology, and Innovation Agenda Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Land Management, Livestock, Soils  Elcio Guimaraes  Elcio Guimaraes 
2016 Technical Supervision to the Project: Applying genomic developments in Colombian coffee cultivation sustainability, Agreement No. 102/217 of 2011, between MADR and Colombian Coffee Growers Federation Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-08-01  2012-10-01  Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Gerardo Gallego  Gerardo Gallego 
2015 Pilot Testing of Global Bioenergy Partnership GBEP indicators for sustainable bioenergy in targeted developing countries Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-08-10  2012-12-31  Estimating social sustainability indicators in biofuel production in Colombia Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Carolina Gonzalez  Carolina Gonzalez 
2008 Training to producers that wish to develop productive projects with technological value, with support from FINAGRO (Colombian Financial Fund for the Agricultural Sector) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-06-29  2013-06-29  The main purpose of this project is strength decision making process and criteria to use and apply technological packages. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Hernan Ceballos  Hernan Ceballos 
2006 REGGATTA: Regional Gateway for Technology Transfer and Climate Change Action Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-03-30  2012-07-30  The main purpose of this project us to provide technical advice to Pangea Foundation to identify ecosystem benefits in 5 watersheds level in Caldas, Colombia. Colombia      Climate Change  Jeimar A. Tapasco A.  Jeimar A. Tapasco A. 
2004 Bases for developing biological control strategies of fruit borer Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in Andean exotic Solanaceae fruits Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-08-12  2012-10-26  The main objective of this project is to develop knowledge, methodologies and techniques that allow to implement biological control of in in Andean exotic Solanaceae fruits in Colombia and Venezuela Colombia, Venezuela      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Gerardo Gallego  Gerardo Gallego 
2003 Making of a study on agro-climatic analysis for establishing a passion-fruit crop for the Passion-fruit Project Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-09  2012-05-28  The main purpose of this project is to collect technical and economical information about passion-fruit crop feasibility, in order to facilitate linking farmers to to markets in Nicaragua. Nicaragua      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Carolina Gonzalez  Carolina Gonzalez 
1997 Thermotherapy chamber: A rapid and eco-efficient method for cleaning and mass propagation of cassava and plantain seed, within the scope of the Latin America and the Caribbean – Brazil Agricultural Innovation Marketplace Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-11-07  2015-05-07  Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Elizabeth Alvarez  Elizabeth Alvarez 
1996 Genomic approaches to understanding resistance and virulence in the cereal-Striga interaction for targeted breeding of durable defence Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-09-01  2016-08-31  This proposal aims to identify multiple Quantitative Trait loci (QTL) and genes underlying post-attachment resistance in rice to Striga species and to characterise Striga QTL that enable parasites to overcome host resistance Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Mathias Lorieux  Mathias Lorieux 
1995 Analysis of Colombian productive systems for Climate Change adaptation Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-12-19  2014-07-31  The main objectives of this project are: To support Colombian agriculture to adapt to climate change phenomenon To contribute to reduce yield gap through applying site specific agriculture for prioritized sectors To prove and validate technological options for main crops adaptation To contribute to create sustainable and environmentally friendly productive systems To establish payment for ecosystem services schemes Colombia      Climate Change  Andrew Jarvis  Andrew Jarvis 
1993 Plot and Landscape Scale Diversifications of Andean Agroecosystems Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-11-01  2013-10-31  The specific objectives of this project are: Understand the socio-economic factors that determine current management of fallows and the overall planning and diversity of farms and farming landscapes Develop improved and diversified fallows to enhance the restoration of soil fertility, increase plot level productivity and profitability, and contribute to agroecosystem resilience in the face of climate change at a representative site with typical hillslope soils in the Central Andes Examine the role of farmscape composition and organization in overall farm productivity and agroecosystem functioning for farming in landscapes in three sites with contrasting socio-economic and environmental conditions. Colombia      Land Management, Soils  Steve Fonte  Steve Fonte 
1992 Assesment of current capacities and needs for institutional and individual capacity development in agricultural innovation systems in Central America Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-12-21  2013-06-21  Colombia      Agrobiodiversity  Simone Staiger  Simone Staiger 
1990 Pan-African Beans Research Alliance (PABRA) – Phase IV Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-03-25  2014-03-31  The main especific objectives of this fourth phase of PABRA are: To address nutrition and health, food security, environmental stresses and market challenges that will contribute to improve the livelihood and create income of resource poor small holder families in Eastern, Central, Southern and Western Africa To identify and develop opportunities, strategies and technologies to improve bean productivity and product quality in ways that contribute to more resilient and sustainable land use by resource poor farmers To improve food, nutrition security and health of vulnerable communities To link farmers to equitable and sustainable bean markets Reach a diverse clientele of end users with adapted and preferred bean varieties, environment stress management options, and micronutrients bean based products Strengthen Capacity building and knowledge management for policy and advocacy Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo Dem. Rep., Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Robin Buruchara  Robin Buruchara 
1989 Climate Change and Energy in Latin America and the Caribbean – Guyana Terra I Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-11-15  2013-03-15  The main goal of this project is to provide the tools that will allow us to analyze the impact of large scale development projects on natural habitats. It is therefore a retrospective analysis with a great potential to become a development planning tool for future infrastructure projects that will therefore consider their impact on deforestation and make the necessary adjustments to reduce habitat harm before their start up. Guyana      Climate Change  Andrew Jarvis  Andrew Jarvis 
1988 Compilation and organization of remote sense images available in the Area of Nicaragua and Honduras Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-10-20  2013-01-17  Honduras, Nicaragua      Climate Change  Peter Laderach  Peter Laderach 
1987 Engineering selective autophagy for virus elimination in cassava Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-11-01  2014-04-30  The main purpose of this project is to modify autophagy (a pathway for quality control and recycling of cell components) to target pathogenic viruses. This new strategy for virus elimination in plants will first be tested with viruses affecting cassava, but it should be  functional in other plant-virus systems as well. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Wilmer Cuellar   
1986 Baseline susceptibility studies of Spodoptera frugiperda, Helicoverpa zea and Diatraea saccharalis to purified CryIF endotoxin protein Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-08-01  2013-12-15  The main objective of this project is to conduct baseline susceptibility studies of Spodoptera frugiperda, Helicoverpa zea and Diatraea saccharalis to purified CryIF endotoxin protein Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Jairo Rodríguez  Jairo Rodríguez 
1985 Endophytic Biological Control for Cassava and Beans Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-11-01  2014-04-30  The main objective of this project is o produce a transformative leap in the sustainability of using fungal entomopathogens  Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Soroush Parsa  Soroush Parsa 
1984 Supporting Investments in Upscaling of Grain Legumes in Western Kenya through Assessing and Modeling the Threat of Biotic Stressors Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-09-01  2014-02-28  A major goal of this project is to guide ongoing and future crop/varietal deployment efforts, improve strategic decision making, increase the likelihood of crop/varietal adoption and thus the improvement of farmer livelihoods by determining the extent and pattern of the threat posed by pests and diseases to current legume up/out-scaling efforts in W. Kenya. The specific objectives of this study are to: Determine and map the actual distribution (incidence and severity) of legume pests and diseases in W. Kenya – both individually and in combination Ascertain extent and pattern of biotic stress problems on legumes being deployed at scale in comparison with legumes being grown in parallel under “normal” farmer conditions Conduct rapid assessment of the impact of agroecological variables (pest/disease dispersal mechanisms, host diversity, host resistance and host patch size, barriers and corridors, multi-trophic interactions, habitat management at plot and landscape levels, and climatic and edaphic factors) on pest/disease dynamics with the aim of refining a framework for ecological pest management and applying it to the pest complex that is identified through the survey. Kenya      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Matthew Abang  Robin Buruchara 
1983 N for Africa: Putting Nitrogen Fixation to Work for Smallholder Farmers in Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-09-29  2013-10-31  The main purposes of this project are: To establish a baseline of the current status of BNF, identify farm enterprises and niches for targeting N2-fixing legumes in the impact zones, and establish mechanisms for Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) and impact assessment Select multi-purpose legumes (providing food, animal feed, structural materials and high quality residues) for enhanced BNF and integrate improved varieties into farming systems. Select superior rhizobia strains for enhanced BNF and develop inoculum production capacity in sub-Saharan Africa through collaboration with private sector partners Deliver legume and inoculant technologies to farmers throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Develop and strengthen capacity for BNF research, technology development, and application. Kenya, Uganda      Soils  Jeroen Huising  Deborah Bossio 
1982 Conservation and Sustainable Use of High-Andean Ecosystems of Peru through cinoebsation of Environmental Services of Peru poverty alleviation and social Inclusion Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-09-15  2012-12-31  Peru      Ecosystem Management  Marcela Quintero  Marcela Quintero 
1981 Scientific Planning and Documentation Skill Development using the Example of Ensiling Approaches for Tropical Forages to Achieve Improved Animal Nutrition Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-09-18  2013-06-15  The expected outcome of this project is an increased capacity to develop consistent and realistic research proposals independently and improved technical knowledge to carry out their research in a sound scientific manner. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Michael Peters  Michael Peters 
1980 Strategic Assessment of Research Priorities of the RTB, and Support to RTB Task Theme Leaders Centro Internacional de la Papa  2012-01-01  2013-12-31  The project will develop a background analysis of RTB crops as a first step in a larger priority setting process. Project researchers will examine the geographic dimensions of RTB crops, including an analysis of production, area, yields, abiotic and biotic constraints, among others. Data will be analyzed at finest spatial resolutions available as well as country, agroecological zone and combinations of all of these. Relationships between developing-country poverty patterns and each RTB crop will be examined. Using publically available data sets, the team will analyze trends related to these crops and how these might impact on the RTB program. A preliminary yield gap analysis will survey the literature, analyze FAOSTAT country data and review yields from trial data on experiment stations. A socioeconomic matrix will be developed as a tool for subsequent expert consultations. All of the information used in the analysis will be packaged into an information resource, including interactive maps, available on the RTB web site. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Luis Augusto Becerra  Bernardo Creamer, Dominique Dufour, Glenn Hyman, Luis Augusto Becerra 
1977 Modelling and manipulation of plant-aphid interactions: A new avenue for sustainable disease management of an important crop in Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-09-01  2016-08-31  The overall objective is to assess potential risks/benefits for disease management by adapting the knowledge/tools from studying VSR-mediated effects on aphid-plant relations to develop ‘push-pull’-type systems to protect bean Burundi, Congo Dem. Rep., Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Matthew Abang   
1976 Phenotyping Parental Lines and Recombinant Inbred Lines Research Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-09-26  2012-09-26  The main objective of this project is to develop a tool that will allow to use the genotype of a plant to predict its phenotype witin a range of environments Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1974 Transforming CIALCA into a Humidtropics platform in East and Central Africa – CIALCA+ Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-01-01  2013-06-30  The Goals of CIALCA+ are: To finalize and document on-going activities and outputs To transform CIALCA into a platform that creates greater positive impact on the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in the Great Lakes Region through more diverse, productive, and eco-efficient farming systems, resulting from a broadened research for development portfolio in the context of the Humidtropics and more effective partnerships integrating all major research and development actors. Specific objectives: To complete on-going CIALCA-II activities towards specific outputs and outcomes, including the finalization of on-going student projects To document the impact of CIALCA and the effectiveness and efficiency of various approaches used To strengthen the Knowledge Resource Centre (KRC) towards a primary Humidtropics venue for accessing information on the Great Lakes Region and developing information tools related to CIALCA products To transform CIALCA into a Humidtropics platform To develop and pilot a research for development agenda for CIALCA+ in the context of the Humidtropics Kenya, Uganda      Soils  Patrick Mutuo   
1973 Innovative beef value chain development schemes in southern Africa International Livestock Research Institute  2013-02-01  2015-05-31  This project engages the private sector and supports market functions, as well as raising the private sector’s capacity to deliver poverty-reducing beef value chain interventions. The proposed innovations in rural financial services will promote smallholders’ emergence from subsistence to the cash economy. The project’s income diversification and risk reduction roles promote food and income security. The project also has a strong knowledge management component, both in its own right and in terms of support to existing International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)-funded projects and other pro-poor livestock projects in southern Africa. Target group The target group is composed of (a) smallholders facing grazing constraints in dry or remote locations; (b) smallholders with access to fodder/feed but no capital for livestock purchase in irrigated areas; and (c) rural traders and those developing small enterprises for rural economic development. Goal The overall goal of the project is to improve and make sustainable smallholder livelihoods from cattle production and marketing. The project will add value to past and ongoing investments in physical infrastructure and institutions by helping to improve the enabling environment and encouraging private-sector investment and commercial involvement. Objectives The objectives of the project are to: Provide smallholders with a viable cattle value addition mechanism that is coordinated with market requirements; Design and demonstrate effective financial instruments and suitable products for enabling smallholder value addition in cattle systems; and Generate and disseminate knowledge, and encourage its uptake, throughout the southern African region. Outputs New organizational arrangements, equipment and consensus on the design of new transaction arrangements; New contract and transaction forms designed, a loan product developed and a trial conducted using action research; and Knowledge disseminated Activities Capacity- and institution-building: Organizational support to traders and producers, promotion of the project, engagement of value chain participants and certification of traders. A proof-of-concept of a value chain finance product: Value chain analysis and participatory activity design, formulation of effective financial instruments and supporting contracts, introduction of a new product and testing, and action research. A scaling-up phase focused on communication and knowledge management: Outcome mapping, information and experience exchange with projects in neighbouring countries, and a regional conference. Swaziland      Livestock, Market Access  Saskia Hendrickx  Hikuepi Katjiuongua, Nadhem Mtimet, Siboniso Moyo 
1972 Reducing vulnerability of Somali communities by raising the capacity of indigenous systems and enhancing market access and consumer welfare International Livestock Research Institute  2012-03-01  2015-02-28  The overall objective of this project is to contribute to Somalia's pro-poor livestock development. This project contributes to reduced vulnerability of pastoral communities by strengthening the use of indigenous resources and increasing market access. The overall objective will be achieved by (1) enhancing local capacity to access indigenous and other knowledge on Somali livestock and mobilize it for decision-makers and (2) engaging industry and government in improving the marketing and safety of livestock products. The project focuses on institutions that enable the gains from improved trade to be better utilized in producer and consumer welfare, and in furthering the interests of women. Private-sector organizations that have emerged as the institutional drivers of the Somali economy will be assisted to provide governance. Their participation in building institutions (knowledge transfer and product standards) is compatible with private incentives and with the public roles of oversight and audit. Specific objectives The specific objectives of the project are to: Compile indigenous knowledge and information on Somali livestock Strengthen professional capacities for classification, standardization and dissemination of knowledge and information about Somali livestock Partner Terra Nuova Somalia      Livestock, Market Access  Derek Baker  Francis Wanyoike, Karen Marshall, Nadhem Mtimet, Nicholas Ndiwa 
1971 Borderlands Coffee Project Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-09-01  2016-08-31  The Borderlands Coffee Project will help 3,200 smallholder farmers in conflict-affected communities along the Colombia-Ecuador border to expand high-value market opportunities and reduce their vulnerability to hunger and environmental degradation Colombia, Ecuador      Market Access  Mark Lundy   
1970 Quantifying the BNI – residual effect from B. humidicola on N-recovery and N-use efficiency (NUE) of the subsequent annual crops Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-05-31  2013-02-28  Our ongoing and past findings indicate substantial reduction in the soil nitrification potential from cultivation of B. humdicola due to accumulation of BNIs in soil systems. Other research groups working on Hyperrhenia diplandra pasture grasses in West Africa noticed a very stable BNI effect (but not properly quantified yet) on nitrification potential in soils. Thus, the aim of this research is to characterize the residual-BNI function from B. humidicola (BH) for the stability and intensity of BNI effect on soil nitrification potential, nitrogen-recovery and N-use efficiency in maize and soybean using the BNI-residual effect from a long-term cultivation (> 10 year pasture) of BH pasture. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock  Idupulapati Rao   
1968 Bread: Hybrid Technologies for Heterosis in Rice and Related Cereals Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-04-15  2013-03-31  The main purposes of this project are: Identify and characterize orthologs of maize SD genes in rice, and other cosexual cereals as time permits Identify and map unisexual traits in related monoecious species of rice Characterize mutant alleles of rice SD orthologs using existing genomic resources and zinc-finger knockout technologies Extend unisexuality traits, initially to rice, with technologies applicable to other cosexual cereals Train young scientists in plant biotechnology, genomics and cereal transformation Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Joseph Tohme   
1967 A Nested Association Mapping (NAM) Population of Rice Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-08-01  2013-07-31  The main objective of this project is to develop a composite population that would be suitable for Nested Association Mapping (NAM) analyses in rice. This population, once genotyped, can be used for fine mapping of numerous QTL alleles for drought tolerance or any other trait of interest, through precise phenotyping in multiple environments Mexico    International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Mathias Lorieux   
1966 Small Coffe Producers and Adaptive Options for a Changing Climate:The Risk and Challenges of certification for Ecosystem Services Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-09  2014-10-01  The main objective of this project is to analyze climate change impact in a crop like coffee in Mexico, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Guatemala; as well as certifications role. Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico      Climate Change  Peter Laderach  Andrew Jarvis 
1957 Developing a livestock traceability system for domestic and export markets in pastoral areas of eastern Africa International Livestock Research Institute  2013-03-01  2014-02-28  Livestock contribute immensely to socio-economic development in the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) region. There are about 68 million livestock units in the region with Ethiopia, Sudan and South Sudan. Most of this region is arid or semi-arid, thus pastoral or agro-pastoral production systems are the dominant socio-economic activities. Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan export a large proportion of their livestock to the Middle East and other international markets. However, transboundary animal diseases pose a great risk for further development and sustainability of inter-regional livestock trade. Some of these disease (for example, Rift Valley fever and brucellosis) can be transmitted to humans, thus presenting a public health risk. As a result, importing countries are increasingly concerned about the risk of these diseases being introduced into their countries via livestock or livestock products. For instance, in 1998-99 and 2000, Saudi Arabia and other countries in the Middle East banned imports of livestock and livestock products from the Horn of Africa following outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in the Horn of Africa. Objective The objective of this project is to promote inter-regional livestock trade between the Greater Horn of Africa and the Middle East and harmonize interventions for transboundary animal diseases in the IGAD region in line with the standards of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). This will contribute to reduced poverty and enhanced regional economic growth and integration between East Africa and the Middle East. Specifically, the project aims to promote the development and implementation of harmonized animal health regulations in the Greater Horn of Africa region. This will be achieved through the development of: a framework for surveillance of transboundary animal diseases; harmonized laboratory testing procedures for these diseases; standardized and coordinated approaches to disease control; standard procedures for quarantine stations in the region; and technical and coordination capacity of the member states and the IGAD region. Kenya    African Union, Inter-African Bureau of Animal Resources  Livestock, Market Access  Bernard Bett  Florence Mutua 
1904 Protecting Biodiversity through Improved Community Forest Management and Agroforestry World Agroforestry Centre  2012-09-01  2015-08-31  The purpose of the project is to establish community-driven, sustainable forest management and agroforestry systems to maintain biodiversity and other environmental services, buffer habitat quality, secure land rights and improve livelihoods in three districts in Jambi province. It plans to bolster existing village forest (hutan desa) agreements by establishing more productive agroforestry systems so that they are functioning economically as well as in the interests of biodiversity and we also plan to extend the number of formal village forest agreements. At the same time, through our close liaison with local governments, we expect that secure land tenure and viable village forest agreements that benefit many communities and biodiversity will be extended throughout the region. These activities will be carried out in close partnership and collaborations with WARSI (originally Warung Konservasi) and local governments and will be closely linked with local development processes. Goals of this project are:- 1. The domestication and use of the best “germplasm” for agroforestry 2. Making trees more productive on farms 3. Improving tree-product marketing for smallholder farmers 4. Making land healthier through agroforestry 5. Using agroforestry to reduce the impact of, and help people and landscapes adapt to, climate change 6. Developing policies and reward systems for multi-use landscapes that provide “environmental services” Expected outcomes include:- 1) Securing community-based land and forest tenure over large areas of nine community territories in Jambi (led by WARSI) 2) Integrate all Geo-referenced communities’ territories into provincial spatial planning 3) Landscape analysis of biodiversity, watershed functions and carbon 4) Livelihoods’ analyses that support environmental services 5) The maintenance and improvement of multiple environmental services, that is, biodiversity, hydrology and climate regulation in a sustainable landscape, are promoted through integrated, inclusive and informed land-use planning at district level Indonesia  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Market Access, Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Ujjwal Pradhan   
1905 Implementing the Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture Project Activities in Kenya and Tanzania World Agroforestry Centre  2012-09-30  2014-10-31  The main goal of the overage Mitigation of Climate Change (MICCA) Project is to facilitate developing countries in contributing to the mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture and moving towards low carbon emission agriculture. Project Activities include: 1) Analyze sociology-economic and biophysical data with households implementing climate smart practices based on the menu of practices. 2) Continue to build capacity of farmers and farmer groups and development and extension practitioners for increased crop-livestock-tree productivity using climate smart practices through farming and demonstration sites. 3) Measure progress in ecosystem characteristics monitoring changes using the Land Health Surveillance Framework and employing Greenhouse Gas Flux measurements Expected outputs 1) Increased capacity development and implementation of climate smart agricultural practice for increased sustainable crop productivity; 2) Increased productivity and land health (including biological diversity and risks to water quality and quantity) 3) Measurement and monitoring to access carbon stocks and net emissions within farming systems and landscapes Kenya, Tanzania  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-4, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management, Livestock, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems, Water Management  Keith Shepherd  Henry Neufeldt, Steve Franzel 
1903 Tree Crops Development in Africa and Asia to Benefit the Poor World Agroforestry Centre  2012-09-01  2014-04-30  The goal of this project is to reduce rural poverty in Kenya, Mali , Cameroon, Ghana and India by promoting wealth and health of poor farming communities and consumers through enhanced cultivation, processing, marketing and use of diversity of fruit, nut and oilseed trees. Project Objectives are:- The overall objective of the project shall be to contribute to the transition of small-scale farming systems from subsistence farming to intensified semi-commercial farming of fruit, nut and oilseed trees and of small scale private or community tree nurseries and micro-processors to more business oriented and profitable enterprises.   Cameroon, Ghana, India, Kenya, Mali  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1    Climate Change, Crops, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management, Market Access, Seed Systems  Ramni Jamnadass  Virendra Pal Singh 
1902 Review of Agriculture Environment Indicators and Metrics World Agroforestry Centre  2012-09-03  2012-12-31  Purpose:- Building on the Global Foresight Report on Food and Farming Futures, and recent initiatives including the Integrated Monitoring System for African Landscapes, the purpose of this work is to:- Identify lessons and opportunities for the derivation and use of data from monitoring systems in the sustainable intensification of agriculture (i.e enhancing productivity with less impact on scarce natural resources and which do not contribute to climate change and biodiversity loss) In particular, this review will systematically 1) Map out key initiatives in data monitoring systems relating to agriculture, ecosystem health and poverty and well-being; including their objectives indicators and metrics used. 2) Gap analysis of systems, indicators and metrics, identifying strengths and weaknesses in methodology and use. 3) Undertake an evidence-based synthesis of applicability at different levels, standardization of indicators, composite metrics, coverage and replicability, validity, cost of indicator systems. 4) Synthesize lessons, guided by an expert panel, drawing of the evidence collated in the mapping and gap analysis. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-4    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Land Management  Keith Shepherd   
1921 Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) World Agroforestry Centre  2012-12-01  2013-11-30  The purpose of this project is to improve greenhouse gas accounting and to quantify the community benefits of best management practices on wastelands in the South Asia Region Activities are: 1. Purchase all equipment required for field work. 2. Organize field work in five ecoregions of India using paired plot design to assess their degree of recovery from degradation in Forest Ecosystems FES ecosystem rehabilitation sites. 3. Work with Ecosystems FES teams and other partners as appropriate, to collect data in all sites. 4. Subcontract with a local labaratory to analyze soils for total Carbon, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, CEC,) exchangeables bases, Al toxicity and pH. 5. Compile all data into database. 6. Deliver a report with analysis of the dataset. Deliverables. 1. A wokplan for the postdoctoral scientist 2. A summary report on the implementation of the work in India. India  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management  Virendra Pal Singh   
1927 Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme (ASAP) – Related Remote Sensing Baseline Analysis World Agroforestry Centre  2013-02-01  2014-01-31  The Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme (ASAP) is a new direct entry point in IFAD to channel earmarked climate and environmental finance to smallholder farmers. An important element of ASAP is the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to better understand and monitor landscape use for effective project design. Activities expected of ICRAF include :- 1. Assess availability and quality of remote sensing baseline data for countries in which ASAP interventions are being designed, and provide existing, readily available maps which can be used by project design team, starting with an initial 15 countries. 2. Develop a realistic operational plan that reconciles spatial data, information and knowledge (including models) availability with the relevant needs of IFAD projects and the necessary capacities required to serve those needs, based on an initial list of countries  and projects. This operational plan will be developed in consultative manner with IFAD and based on actual programming need. 3. Implement the operational plan with the wider range of countries and projects contingent on available capacities. 4. Research opportunities and limitations of remote sensing and GIS based data for smallholder climate change adaptation planning and summarise them in at least one knowledge product that can be published and disseminated by IFAD in support of practical programming purposes. 5. Contribute towards the development of a near-real time geoscience labaratory at ICRAF that utilizes remote sensing and rigorous statistical approaches for smallholder adaptation planning under different scenarios. 6. Liase with IFAD and ICRAF staff to assess the effectiveness of the institutional partnership between ICRAF and IFAD and , as appropriate, develop a grant proposal for follow up institutional cooperation. Eritrea, Ethiopia, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management  Tor Vagen   
1928 Participatory Monitoring by Civil Society of Land-use Planning for Low-Emissions Development Strategies World Agroforestry Centre  2013-01-01  2016-12-31  Overall Objective Papua achieves its low emissions development goal and contributions significantly to Indonesia's overall low emissions development as an integralpart of climate change strategies. Specific objectives: 1. Tools,indicators, and monitoring and evaluation systems developed for land-use planning for low-emissions development 2. Key civil society groups in Papua have the capacity to participate and monitor the planning cycle of low-emissions development in the land-based sector 3. Land-based RAD-GRK development and negotiations at the district level are supported and reviewed; compilation and negotiation at the provincial level and links to the national level are facilitated 4. Land-based policies, regulations and strategies are reviewed to support  the low emission development strategy in Papua province Key activities to be carried out by ICRAF under Work Packages (W1, W2, W3, W4) Activities under W1 1. Develop community-based carbon and biodiversity monitoring system 2. Develop inclusive, integrated and informed spatial planning methodology 3. Develop civil society Monitoring and Evaluation , M&E system for implementation of spatial planning 4. Develop civil society Monitoring and Evaluation , M&E system for investment and development initiatives 5. Develop civil society Monitoring and Evaluation , M&E system for sustainable landscapes,including ecological, economic and social indicators Activities under W2 1. Develop and conduct training courses for civil society, including communities 2. Facilitate working groups within districts 3. Develop a network for sharing learning between society actors across districts 4. Facilitate stakeholders' dialogues within districts 5. Develop a platform for stakeholders' negotiations within districts Activities under W3 1. Develop and implement participatory spatial planning using the Land-UsePlanning for Low Emissions Development Strategy (LUWES) methodology in threedistricts 2. Integrate district processes and results into the provincial process 3. Integrate the district and provincial processes and results intonational climate-change policies and strategies 4. Develop and facilitate a monitoring and evaluation system by civilsociety and government of the whole planning at the district and provincial levels Activities under W4 1. Kick off meeting in Bogor 2. Inception workshop in Jayapura 3. Annual planning meetings 4. Annual reporting 5. Final report 6. Auditing The outputs envisaged to achieve the specific objective. 1. Training protocols, manual of tools and softwares, and compilation of relevant and available data for Papua to conduct their land use planning for low emission development 2. Monitoring and evaluation technical practices and inclusive mechanisms of the planning of land uses for low emission development and the implementationof the planning within the full planning cycle in Papua 3. Civil society's capacity to participate and monitor the implementation of low-emission development plans are strengthened 4. Three working groups for low-emission development at the three selected districts are established as the negotiation platform low-emission 5. Consensus developed to support the implementation of low-emission development initiatives and social safeguards 6. Nested approach, from sub-national to national levels, of low emission development planning is supported Indonesia  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Ujjwal Pradhan   
1930 Building a Large Evergreen Agriculture Network for Southern Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2013-01-01  2014-12-31  The overall objective is to mobilise a network of government organisations,international institutions, donors, NGOs and private sector bodies for a well-coordinated and coherent investment in research and development in agroforestry and Evergreen agriculture in Southern Africa. ICRAF's expectations · Assure that the implementation is in conformity with this Programme Agreement · Use the funds exclusively for the implementation of the programme as set out in the programme document annexed to this Agreement. · Provide the necessary control measures in order to comply with the terms of implementation. · Provide all reporting document. · Provide all appropriate staff to carry out the activities. · Establish and assure the functioning of the Steering Committee · Exchange all information necessary for the programme to be implemented efficiently and effectively. Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-3, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-4, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions  Sileshi Weldesamayat   
1931 Development of timber and non-timber forest products’ production and market strategies for improvement of smallholders’ livelihoods in Indonesia World Agroforestry Centre  2013-01-01  2016-12-31  The aim of this project is to identify, enhance and expand smallholders’ involvement in the management of commercial, forestry-based products at different spatial scales in eastern Indonesia. The project will address the following research questions. 1) How can forestry and agroforestry management practices be improved to enhance integrated timber and non-timber forest product (NTFP) management and production?   2) What are suitable strategies for effective integrated marketing of timber and NTFPs for smallholders?   3) What policy factors significantly hinder smallholders’ production and competitiveness in timber and NTFPs and how can those factors be addressed?   4) What are the key characteristics of an extension program that can deliver information on best practices for timber and NTFP management, production and value-added marketing?   Activities will be organized in four objectives/components: Development and implementation of integrated timber and NTFP production systems to enhance local livelihoods. Identification and implementation of enhanced marketing strategies and value chains to improve timber and NTFP market links for smallholders. Analysis and improvement of policy frameworks to facilitate smallholders’ production and integrated marketing of timber and NTFPs. Enhance expansion of smallholder-managed integrated timber and NTFP production systems. Indonesia  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-3    Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Ujjwal Pradhan  Ujjwal Pradhan 
1933 Support Services for Land Use Planning, District Readiness, Strategic Environmental Assessment and Related Preparatory Activities for the Green Prosperity (GP) Project in Indonesia World Agroforestry Centre  2012-12-12  2013-09-12  The Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) plans to invest considerable US Government resources in supporting environmentally sustainable, low carbon economic growth in Indonesia through the Green Prosperity Project. Careful assessment, analysis, and identification of districts in up to 12 provinces is needed to ensure that these investments are well placed and produce the greatest return on investment possible. Although several factors will contribute the project’s success, MCC recognizes that consulting with beneficiary communities and stakeholders and securing their buy-in will greatly increase the project’s impact and effectiveness. Similarly, the project’s activities should be designed to fully reflect the on-the-ground context of the target geographies and potential environmental impacts that must be fully assessed and mitigated. At the same time, there is a renewed urgency to initiate Green Prosperity and demonstrate positive impacts quickly. The Green Prosperity, GP Project, one of three projects included in MCC Compact with the GOI, seeks to promote sustained growth and poverty reduction in Indonesia through investments in renewable energy and sustainable management and use of natural resources. Project activities, which will include both technical and financial assistance for low-carbon development projects will be based on the GOI’s medium- to long-term development plan, its National Action Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Regional Spatial Plans, and intensive participatory land-use planning involving local communities and governments in provinces and districts selected based on their potential for poverty reduction and the attainment of environmental objectives. The tasks included in this assignment are intended to facilitate the launch of the project in the starter districts, document lessons learned in order to inform the project rollout in additional districts throughout the country, and develop and apply a rigorous methodology for selecting the additional districts. More specifically, in addition to the development of an inception and a final report, this activity will undertake the following main tasks with relation to the start-up of project activities in each of the four starter districts: 1. Land Use and Spatial Planning Needs Assessment 2. Preparation of district guidelines for village boundary setting 3. Facilitation of multi-stakeholder fora 4.  SEA   Expected Project Outputs 1. Recommendation for activities to be carried out under the Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP) Activity 2.  Guidelines for participatory administrative boundary setting that will be utilized for implementation of the PLUP Activity   Indonesia  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Land Management  MARTUA THOMAS Sirait   
1916 Sharing Knowledge on Ready-to-Scale High Potential Pro-Poor Agricultural Technologies in India. World Agroforestry Centre  2012-12-01  2013-02-28  The overall purpose of this initiative is to initiate a process of mainstreaming and scaling up of appropriate high potential pro-poor agricultural “technologies” (technology models, packages, practices /concepts / processes, etc.) by the state governments and other stakeholders. The initiative will specifically create an awareness and provide information about new (not substituting the existing ones with analogues) and proven high potential agricultural technologies , and provide a platform for cross fertilization of knowledge and ideas among experts / research organizations, financial institutions, state and central government departments, civic societies and service and input providers. Such technologies are particularly relevant for the rain-fed areas in the eastern parts and the Indo-Gangetic plains of the country, particularly in the context of climate change. With a large population density and being prone to both floods and droughts, the eastern India region struggles to sustain production and productivity of major cereals, pulses and oilseeds and ensure the food security. These new technologies are expected not only to maintain, but enhance productivity and the production levels. The scaling –up of high potential agricultural technologies would increase productivity of crops and livestock to meet the growing demand for food and improving food and nutrition security of the poor and vulnerable residing in the remote rural areas of the country. Additionally, it is envisaged that the transfer of high potential technologies would also make agriculture attractive to rural youth and create more livelihood opportunities resulting in less distress migration. Goal: The selection of appropriate ready to scale innovative and high potential technologies is the most vital aspect of this event. ICRAF tasks 1) Developing an analytical framework and a set of technical, economic and social filters for identifying the best practices and prioritizing their cultural acceptability, familiarity, effectiveness, “sustainability” and scalability, 2) Using the framework, review the technologies under key themes (areas), such as the resource management, climate change resilient (smart) practices, knowledge management based applications and market linkage in relation to productivity gains and economies of scale, 3) Develop a scaling up process and implementation road map by involving various stakeholders, and 4) Package the scaling up of flagship technologies / practices in ecologically well characterized “technology fit matched - delineated” areas at scales, especially in external development portfolio supported states Deliverables 1. Identification of 4-6 best “technologies” (technology models, packages, practices /concepts / processes) from a basket comprising different commodities, systems, methods & processes, etc. and screening them through various biophysical, socio-economic and cultural diversity filters via a task force composed of specialists in these disciplines, 2. Presenting the selected scalable “technologies” in a “Share Fair Workshop” having about 50-60 participants for critiquing and buy in in them and for supporting the scaling up efforts. This group will comprise of the representatives from the Department of Agriculture as well as relevant research institutions, State Governments and line departments, Financial Institutions, Knowledge Commission, CGIAR centers, UN nod other selected international organizations. Officials from other relevant ministries and the Planning Commission will also be invited. The 2 day “Share Fair Workshop” will set a template for at least an annual workshop to be held each year to take stock and promote the potential technologies, particularly those that have been generated through the support of financial institutions, so that they can be built in the development portfolios of such institutions and provide benefits to a larger pool of clientele, 3. Determine the application domains of the “flagship technologies” by matching the profile of the technologies (technology utilization requirements) with the potential target area qualities and the utilizers (farmers in case of agri. technologies) resource base, 4. Package the scalable (smart agricultural) technologies and prepare a template for their scaling up and provide it to various stakeholders for wider clientele use. India  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Climate Change, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems, Water Management  Virendra Pal Singh   
1918 Support to National REDD+ Programme World Agroforestry Centre  2012-12-18  2013-07-31  This agreement will support the objectives of the UN-REDD Programme and its 'Support to National REDD Actions' Programme, specifically on REDD+ as a catalyst for a green economy. Specific Objectives. a) Support UNEP with the establishment and operations of an International Expert Panel on Landscapes in Green Economy. b) Support UNEP with the disseminate of clear and concise information through the organization of a regional conference for Africa on forests and REDD+ in a Green Economy. c) Articulate key messages on green economy, forests and sustainable land use through articles in the popular media and the internet. Activities of ICRAF include:- a) Facilitating the establishment of an International Expert Panel on Landscapes in a Green Economy, including supporting UNEP with finalizing the draft Terms of Reference for experts; support UNEP with the organization of the first meeting of the International Expert Panel on Landscapes in a Green Economy. b) Support UNEP with the organization of the Regional Conference for Africa, in Nairobi, on exchanging information and experience on the potential of REDD+ and forests for a green economy transition. c) Draft atlest 5 popular articles for publication based on the results of UNEP's UN-REDD Programme work on outcome 6 'Green economy transformation and REDD+ strategies and investments are mutually reinforcing' Expected Results and Outputs Results expected. 1) The understanding of a Scientific, policy and practice community on sustainable land-use and landscape planning, especially of forests, is increased promoting green economy transformations in developing countries. 2) The awareness of scientific, policy and practice community is raised about sustainable use of forests and other forests and other land use and the relationship to the green economy. Outputs Expected are:- 1) The International Expert Panel on Landscape in a Green Economy established and first meeting convened. 2) Report from Regional Conference and a network of practitioners on exchanging expereince on the role of forests and REDD+ for a Green Economy in Africa. 3) Atleast 5 articles published. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management  Paul Stapleton   
1922 AFS-4-FOOD Enhancing Food Security and Well-being of Rural African Households through Improved Synergy between Agro-Forestry Systems and Food Crops World Agroforestry Centre  2012-04-05  2015-04-04  The overall objective of the project is to enhance food security and wellbeing of rural African households through improved synergy between foodcrops and perennial agroforestry systems (AFS) via a participatory research approach and an intra-regional scientific collaboration network. The specific objectives are to: - Analyse the main drivers that have transformed farming systems (foodcrop and AFS) to identify the more resilient ones likely to withstand future hazards. - Assess the contribution of AFS to food security and resilience at plot, farm, and landscape levels. - Identify pathways that better conciliate production with provision of environmental services for rural poverty alleviation. - Consolidate African research capacities and scientific network in tropical agroforestry. Main Activities: 1. Management and dissemination of results and recommendations. 2. Characterisation of farming systems and identification of long term drivers at household and landscape levels. 3. Assessment of synergies between AFS and food-crops at plot, farm, and landscape levels for productivity and environmental services. 4. Characterization of the AFS main-crop quality for potential value addition to the farmers’ incomes. Project outputs 1. Productive and Environmental Interactions between AFS and food Crops at plot, farm, and landscape levels 2. Pathways to improve synergies between AFS and food crops at plot level Cameroon, Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2    Crops, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management  Fergus Sinclair   
1908 The Biodiversity for Food and Nutrition Project Bioversity International  2012-04-28  2017-04-28  The Biodiversity for Food and Nutrition Project - officially the "Mainstreaming Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Use for Improved Human Nutrition and Well-being" project - is a global multi-country, multi-partner project launched to address growing concerns over the rapid disappearance of agricultural biodiversity, particularly traditional crops and wild species with nutritional potential, in four countries: Brazil, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Turkey. The project is also concerned with the disappearance of the traditional knowledge associated with the preparation, storage and cultural use of these foods, which, in the past, made up a significant proportion of local diets. Bringing together a wide range of national and international partners from the environment, agriculture, nutrition, health and education sectors, the project will build on growing evidence showing that agricultural biodiversity has the potential to fulfill many of the nutritional requirements needed for a healthy and balanced diet and thus can help reverse the alarming trends in under- and over-nutrition afflicting many countries worldwide. The evidence will be used to conserve and promote the use of these species in the four countries by: Raising awareness of their importance Creating markets and value chains for their use Making sure that future policies and strategies that tackle malnutrition include the sustainable use of agricultural biodiversity as a cost-effective solution to rising diet-related nutrition and health conditions - such as nutrient deficiencies and obesity The global multi-country-led project will make possible the exchange of experiences, tools and mechanisms and stimulate the identification of lessons learned and best practices that can be built upon as a global project. For example, in Brazil significant linkages have already been established between the agriculture, health and education sectors, which provide models and examples for the other countries participating in this project. Likewise, in Kenya efforts to enhance linkages between farmers and markets based on the nutritionally-superior African Leafy Vegetables provide excellent lessons and good practices for other participating countries. By bringing these experiences and practices together in a global context, the project will be able to facilitate considerable South-to-South cooperation and sharing, as well as potential for replication and scaling-up of these outputs and results beyond the project countries. National partners Brazil Ministry of Environment (MMA) Ministry of Agrarian Development (MDA) Ministry of Social Development and Fight Against Hunger (MDS) Ministry of Health (MS) National Food Supply Company (CONAB) Ministry of Education/National Fund for Education Development (MEC/FNDE) Kenya Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Ministry of Medical Services National Museums of Kenya Sri Lanka Ministry of Environment Department of Agriculture Department of Health Department of National Botanic Gardens Universities of Ruhuna, Peradeniya and Wayamba NGOs: Green Movement of Sri Lanka, Community Development Centre and Seva Lanka Foundation Turkey Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs (MARA) Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MOEF) Turkish Association for the Protection of Nature (TTKD) International partners Funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the initiative is coordinated by Bioversity International with implementation support from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Given the cross-sectoral and multi-disciplinary nature of this project, additional support is coming from the World Food Programme (WFP); the Earth Institute, Columbia University; Crops for the Future; the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and AVRDC - The World Vegetable Centre in facilitating both implementation and scaling up of activities. For further information please visit the project website, download the BFN Project Flyer, or subscribe to the BFN Project Newsletter.   Brazil, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Turkey  2010-2012|Bioversity|BIOVERSITY-F01    Agrobiodiversity, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Danny Hunter  Teresa Borelli 
1895 Competitive smallholder livestock in Botswana International Livestock Research Institute  2012-09-01  2015-08-31  Background The smallholder sector produces most of Botswana’s meat and over 70% of the country’s agricultural gross domestic product. Although past policy and research have focused on the beef export sector, rather little information has been generated on the circumstances and potential of the 80,000 smallholders who own most of the country’s cattle, and the 100,000 households that earn livelihoods from sheep and goats.  This leaves strategies and investments for rural development and livelihood generation without a basis in data and analysis. For both cattle and small ruminants, more competitive smallholder systems can improve livelihoods.  Several factors constrain the production and marketing of surpluses by smallholders: poor animal is one example, that is often made worse by the complexities of communal grazing, and by limited access to services. This 3-year research project asks the following questions, and engages partners in research industry and government to help answer them: What are the characteristics of smallholder livestock producers in Botswana and what factors constrain their livelihoods? How can livestock-related marketing systems in Botswana be improved for the benefit of smallholders and the rural population? The project has three objectives: To better define smallholder livestock production systems and to identify the factors affecting the productivity of smallholder livestock producers and assess their competitiveness To understand and improve conditions for market participation and value addition in markets for livestock, livestock products and inputs To strengthen the capacity of agricultural education and extension Project activities centre on: Data collection and analysis New thinking arising from new knowledge Regular communication of results Packaging of results into training and extension materials Some of the project’s first steps are to: Define and measure competitiveness Select project sites for a baseline survey Identify animal diseases and measure their prevalence The outcomes from this project will be improved and more sustainable livelihoods amongst smallholder livestock keepers, and increased uptake and use of scientific and economic knowledge by those providing services to smallholders. Partners Botswana Institute for Development Policy Analysis Botswana Ministry of Agriculture Funder Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research Botswana      Livestock  Sirak Bahta  Derek Baker, Hikuepi Katjiuongua, Siboniso Moyo 
1893 Comprehensive Technical Backstopping to Develop the Sustainable Land and Water Management component of the PROSADE Project Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-26  2014-04-25  The main objective of this project is to provide technical backstopping and training to the technical staff of the PROSADE project, in regards to the sustainable land and water management component, with a special focus on innovating agricultural production systems to ensure food security for the project beneficiaries and strengthening market alternatives for the target crops Honduras      Ecosystem Management, Water Management  María Eugenia Baltodano   
1892 Join efforts to develop a methodology for the design and route map of a subnational program of mechanisms aimed to share the benefits derived from the hydrologic ecosystem services in five river basins of the Department of Caldas, Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-03-30  2012-07-30  The project seeks to provide the Pangea Foundation with technical backstopping for the identification of ecosystem benefits in five river basins of the Department of Caldas, Colombia; and to design methodologies to measure such benefits, along with a route map for designing and implementing subnational programs of benefit-sharing mechanisms Colombia      Ecosystem Management, Water Management  Jeimar A. Tapasco A.   
1890 Associative Mapping of Drought Tolerance in Common Beans Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-05-28  2015-05-27  The main objective of this project is to identify regions of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genome that are possibly controlling traits that confer drought tolerance, by using associative mapping, with the intent to share this information with bean genetic improvement programs Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1888 Two Pilot Studies to Assess Technology Adoption and Measure the Socio-Economic Impact of Agricultural Products/Technologies – Elasticities of Cotton Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-11-15  2012-02-29  The main objective of this project is to conduct two pilot studies to assess technology adoption and measure the socio-economic impact of agricultural products/technologies – Elasticities of cotton Colombia      Crops, Policy & Institutions  Carolina Gonzalez   
1887 Technology innovations for the integrated management of frogskin disease in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-12-22  2014-12-22  The project aims to strengthen value chains, while improving the socio-economic well-being of cassava producers and reducing cassava frogskin disease in Colombia, Costa Rica, and Paraguay; through the development and massive implementation of innovative technologies aimed to optimize productivity, reduce the effects of climate change on the crop, and protect the environment, using a participatory research scheme involving universities, cassava producers, and processors. Colombia, Costa Rica, Paraguay      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops  Elizabeth Alvarez   
1886 Creating the Latin American Soil Information System – First Phase Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-12-20  2013-02-20  Establish the project’s institutional framework through an institutional meeting (on-site or virtual) with the different focal points at country level. Establish the pedological databases at national level. All data sources shall be considered. The supplier shall consider mobilizing funds to each country to guarantee the process. Design a database of regional soil profiles using information generated at national level. Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela      Soils  Aracely Castro   
1882 PROAGRO – Sustainable Agricultural Development Program (Bolivia) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-12-01  2011-12-30  The main objective of this project is to generate future climatological data for each decade until 2050 according to different scenarios of GHG emissions for Bolivia Bolivia      Climate Change  Peter Laderach   
1881 Climate change and protected-area management Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-12-12  2012-07-11  A multiscale analysis of vulnerability to climate change is to be carried out in the biological corridor Sierra Madre Oriental that encompasses rural livelihood strategies and ecosystem processes, for decision making in adaptation and mitigation matters. Stakeholders rely on decision-making tools that contribute inputs to the “Guide for Developing Climate Change Adaptation Programs in Natural Protected Areas” of the National Commission for Natural Protected Areas (CONANP) Mexico      Climate Change, Policy & Institutions  Marcela Quintero   
1880 Economic assessment of the profits and losses derived from ecosystem services, and proposal of the action plan for the valuation of the natural patrimony in Huancavelica, Ayacucho, and Apurimac Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-11-25  2012-03-16  The main objective of this project is to develop an economic assessment of the profits and losses derived from ecosystem services, and proposal of the action plan for the valuation of the natural patrimony in Huancavelica, Ayacucho and Apurimac. Peru      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Marcela Quintero   
1879 Endophytic entomopathogens in beans: Ecology, formulation, and potential insecticide Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-12-14  2014-12-13  The main objective of this project is to evaluate the potential of Beauveria bassiana as an endophytic entomopathogen to bean production in Colombia. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Soroush Parsa   
1872 Remote sensing methodology for monitoring changes in land use and associated greenhouse gas emissions in Latin America and the Caribbean Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-10-01  2012-02-15  The main objective is to provide a methodology and data analysis on scenarios of change in land use and GHG emissions estimated for Latin America and the Caribbean that can be used with Toolbox2 of the Inter-American Development Bank. Determine the dimensions of changes in land use, model different scenarios, and GHG emissions resulting from the projects. Colombia      Climate Change, Land Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1871 Join technical efforts to undertake a systematic review to assess etiological, preventive, and therapeutic evidence of anemia, while supporting analysis of the study of key drivers for anemia in Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-10-07  2011-12-31  Prepare and submit for approval of the technical committee the documents concerning the methodological design and analysis plan proposed to carry out the systematic review aimed to assess etiological, preventive, and therapeutic evidence of anemia. Analyze in depth data from ENSIN 2010 that can provide information leading to a more effective identification of key drivers of anemia in children under 5 years old in Colombia. Analyze the ENSIN 2010 databases to establish the correlation of iron deficiency and excessive weight/obesity in Colombian women of childbearing age. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Helena Pachón   
1870 Coffee responses and adaptation to climate change in Central America Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-23  2014-05-22  The project aims to prepare agricultural production systems in Nicaragua and Honduras for progressive climate change. Specifically it seeks to: Predict suitability changes in the most important high-value and staple crops (50 species) considering different scenarios of progressive climate change Evaluate the socio-economic impact of climate change on farmers’ livelihoods and the level of vulnerability of production systems Develop climate change adaptation strategies for the most important production systems and mitigation measures to offset or minimize the adverse effects of climate change to ensure food security. Honduras, Nicaragua      Climate Change, Crops  Peter Laderach   
1869 Predicting the impact of climate change on cacao adaptability for the main producing regions of Nicaragua Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-08-31  2012-06-30  Gather geographical locations of cacao production in cacao-growing regions. Identify the characteristic environmental factors that make these lands suitable for cacao production. Identify the global climate models that are most accurate and relevant to this study area. Compare, evaluate, select, and adapt models to predict crop adaptability. Nicaragua      Climate Change  Peter Laderach   
1867 Characterization, collection, and micropropagation of coconut hybrids from the Colombian Pacific coast, and definition of its entomological complex as strategies to overcome plant health issues of coconuts in Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-06-24  2011-12-31  The main objective of this projects is to characterize and conserve suitable coconut germplasm from the Colombian Pacific coast, by using biotechnology tools, with active participation of coconut-growing communities; and generate base and practical knowledge on the complex red-ring disease caused by the vector known as Gualpa. Other specific objectives are: Identification, characterization, and collection of coconut germplasm with local farmers. Optimization of somatic embryogenesis methodologies (multiplication) and early infestation evaluation focused on the nematode causing the red-ring disease. Definition of the entomological complex that affects coconuts, and development of control strategies based on population studies. Colombia      Crops  Alonso Gonzalez   
1865 Access to differentiated coffee markets Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-07-28  2012-03-28  This projects has six main objectives: Generate climate change data for the short and long terms and different scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions Predict future availability of coffee-growing areas Assess the impact of climate change on coffee quality and production Identify alternative crops under foreseen climate change scenarios Evaluate the effects of climate change under socio-economic parameters Design adaptation strategies for the coffee-growing sector Nicaragua      Climate Change, Crops, Market Access  Peter Laderach   
1864 Socio-economic impact assessment of the Starbucks Coffee and Farmer Equity (C.A.F.E.) Practices Program in the Department of Nariño, Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-15  2011-06-15  The main objective of this project is to assess the socio-economic impact of the Starbucks C.A.F.E. Practices Program in the Department of Nariño in Colombia Colombia      Crops, Policy & Institutions  Carolina Gonzalez   
1863 Increased productivity, competitiveness, and sustainability of small- and medium-sized livestock production systems in the Patía basin and Popayán plateau Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-06  2011-11-06  This project seeks to provide technical support and training to University of Cauca (Unicauca) Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1862 Strengthening Partnerships for Innovation in Beans, Groundnuts and Sesame Research and Technology Transfer in Mozambique Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-10-01  2012-09-30  The project will develop and disseminate proven technologies through partnership and participatory approaches to increase productivity of beans in order to increase rural household income, reduce poverty and enhance food and nutrition security of resource poor farmers, especially women. The project will test and identify locally adapted and high-yielding varieties of beans that are drought tolerant in the face of climate variability and pest and disease resistant to minimize yield losses in the field. Mozambique      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Rowland Chirwa   
1861 Development of cutting edge GRiSP rice transformation platform for complex traits: multigene transformation system and genome editing using TAL Effector Nucleases (TALENs) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-05-01  2015-05-01  To be able to produce enough rice to feed the growing global population, the world needs to use all available tools, including GM technology, at its disposal to improve productivity in a sustainable manner with fewer resources. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Beata Dedicova   
1860 Identifying efficient seed system practices/models to accelerate the access to quality seed of improved varieties legumes, maize and forages to small scale farmers particularly poor and women farmers in Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-01  2012-09-30  Carry out assessment of the representative  of  seed systems models related to production  efficiency, scale  and speed of seed and variety access and information with consideration of the different farmers categories particularly women and poor. Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Seed Systems  Jean Claude Rubyogo   
1859 Value Chain analysis of grain legumes in eastern and southern Africa: Building partnerships for impact through research on sustainable intensification of farming systems Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-01  2012-08-31  The main objective of this project is to support the development of Africa RISING research-for-development project through building partnerships and mobilizing stakeholders in the short term to conduct value chain analyses. Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia      Market Access  Eliud Birachi   
1858 CIAT-EMBRAPA Agreement Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-05-01  2013-02-01  CIAT Transformation Platform is going to provide EMBRAPA with transgenic rice plants. EMPRAPA will proved CIAT  Transformation Platform with ten constructs for the  Agrobacterium mediated transformation of rice Brazil, Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Beata Dedicova   
1856 A catalogue of tested crop, soil, and water management options under varied land degradation conditions and socio-economic environment in the target areas in Tanzania, Malawi, and Zambia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-05-01  2012-12-30  This project has the following four objectives: To avail to partners a set of previously tested soil, crop, and water management options for maize-based farming systems with potential for sustainably intensifying agricultural production and reducing climate-related risk in the target areas To identify land degradation hotspots and soil health constraint envelopes and their implications for crop response characteristics to fertilizer application and soil improvement To evaluate the availability to smallholder farmers of inputs required to implement above options in the target areas To assess the conduciveness of the political, extension, and economic environment for the dissemination of tested soil, crop, and water management options   Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia      Land Management, Soils, Water Management  Patrick Mutuo   
1855 Initiative to Understand the impact of Let’s Talk Coffee Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-01  2012-10-31  The global supply chain gathering hosted annually by sustainable Harvest since 2003. Ciat Will implement the study and analysis as a consultant to sustainable Harvest for this short term. Colombia      Crops, Market Access  Mark Lundy   
1854 The Sustainable Mekong Research Network Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-02-01  2012-12-31  This project aims to answer the question of how do policy makers and implementers contribute most to the livelihoods and food security of communities and small-scale agricultural producers through informed choices between competing adaptation strategies? Laos, Thailand, Vietnam      Climate Change  Rod Lefroy   
1852 Carbon Insetting to confront climate change, improve farmer livelihoods enhance supply chain security Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-03-15  2012-12-31  The main objective of this project is to study the possibilities of a carbon project to small farmers to strength their adaptation, mitigation and livelihoods. Colombia      Climate Change  Peter Laderach   
1851 Preparation of a status and trends study on the conservation and use of Micro-organisms and invertebrates in root crop-based systems Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-08  2012-12-31  The Services will contribute to the Organizational strategic objective of Sustainable management of land, water and genetic resources and improved responses to global environmental challenges affecting food and agriculture. Kenya      Land Management, Soils  Deborah Bossio   
1850 Synthetic Seeds for Clonal Propagation of Disease-Free Cassava Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-05-01  2013-10-31  The project’s aim is to offer to farmers an alternative method of multiplying cassava, a method that helps them exchange cassava germplasm, easily and safely, reducing the incidence and severity of biotic stresses. We would like to develop protocols to produce synthetic seeds for massive propagation of disease-free, true-type cassava plants using somatic embryos as micro-propagules. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Paul Chavarriaga   
1849 Improving nitrogen use efficiency of crops and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture & Establishment of Asia cassava molecular breeding network Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-01  2013-03-31  This project seeks two main objectives: To identify QTL for Nitrogen Use Efficiency trait, particularly biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) in Brachiaria and to assess the benefit of BNI trait in cropping system To develop a cassava network in Asia to strengthen collaborative research on molecular beeding, seed sytem and capacity building for cassava improvement Cambodia, China      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Manabu Ishitani   
1848 Phenomics of Rice Adaptation and Yield Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-02-01  2014-12-31  A major, coordinated phenotyping effort is needed at GRiSP scale and beyond, in order to match the upcoming genomic information (SNP consortium chip, mass sequencing). The two resources together will permit a giant leap forward in terms of gene/allele discovery through association studies, to serve molecular breeding objectives globally. Brazil, Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Joseph Tohme   
1847 Effecting Cange in Seed Security Response: In Crisis, Chronic Stress and Developmental Contexts Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-01  2014-03-31  This project focuses on  tool development and capacity-building in Seed System Security Assessment (SSSA).  Such research skills are critical for designing  immediate response and longer-term programs which  support farmers during periods of  acute (disaster) and chronic stress. The SSSA is the first tool in the world to specifically distinguish between seed security issues and food security issues, and puts agricultural themes at the heart of disaster recovery. Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo Dem. Rep., Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Seed Systems  Robin Buruchara   
1846 Promoting a State of the Art Assessment on Soil Fertility for the Collaborative Crop Research Program, Andes Community of Practice Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-01  2012-06-30  This project has two main objectives: To improve regional dissemination and accessibility of the report entitle “Pathways to Agroecological Intensification of Soil Management by Smallholder Farmers in the Andean Highlands” developed for the Andes Community of Practice of the McKnight foundation. To address questions and gather feedback from regional stakeholders on the report and define the next steps for promoting sustainable soil fertility management in the region. Colombia      Land Management, Soils  Steve Fonte   
1845 Genomics for Agricultural Innovation (Development of Abiotic Stress Tolerant Crops by DREB Genes) – Transformation of Upland Rice and Evaluation of Transformed Rice for Environmental Stress Tolerance Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-04-06  2013-03-01  This project has as main goal to evaluate applicability of various promoter-gene constructs including DREB genes by transgenic approach for increased drought tolerance under field and screenhouse conditions. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Manabu Ishitani   
1843 Harnessing husbandry of domestic cavy for alternative and rapid access to food and income in Cameroon and the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-08-01  2013-12-31  This project seeks to improve food and nutrition security as well as cash income of rural and peri-urban poor in Cameroon and eastern DRC. The project purpose is to foster cavy culture and access to information about it as one of the strategies of the targeted population groups, especially women and children, for increasing meat supply. Cameroon, Congo Dem. Rep.      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Brigitte Maass   
1842 CIAT-TNC Terra I Platform for habitat change monitoring Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-03-06  2012-07-30  This project provided the following main outputs: Identification of methods for developing habitat loss predictions based on statistical analysis of past habitat change using Terra-I Provision to The Nature Conservancy of updated continental gridded datasets on habitat loss every 3 months. Website for Terra-I reports, news and methodological information Production of a policy brief on habitat loss for Colombia and Paraguay Colombia, Paraguay      Climate Change, Ecosystem Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1841 Enhancing dairy-based livelihoods in India and Tanzania through feed innovation and value chain development approaches Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-11-04  2014-12-31  The project seeks to contribute to improved dairy-derived livelihoods in India and Tanzania via intensification of smallholder production focusing on enhancement of feeds and feeding, using innovation and value chain approaches. India, Tanzania      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Brigitte Maass   
1840 Climate-smart Crop-livestock Systems for Smallholders in the Tropics: Integration of New Forage Hybrids to Intensify Agriculture and to Mitigate Climate Change through Regulation of Nitrification in Soil Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-03-01  2015-02-28  The purpose of this project: Small-scale farmers and research and development institutions apply the innovative approach of Biological Nitrification Inhibition (BNI) by Brachiaria humidicola forage grass hybrids to realize benefits in economic and environmental sustainability from integrated crop-livestock production systems Colombia, Nicaragua      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Soils  Idupulapati Rao   
1838 Managing ecosystem services for food security and the nutritional health of the rural poor at the forest-agricultural interface Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-03-01  2016-02-29  The developmental impact of this project will be to contribute to poverty alleviation for the 550 million people living at the forest-agriculture interface (FAI) in the tropics through improved food security and nutritional health and more sustainable management of ecosystem services. The project will provide an improved evidence base on the value of ecosystem services for food security and health, leading to the development of better policies and practices to manage ecosystem services and food security, in turn leading to healthier, more food secure indigenous people who are better able to contribute to economic activity, thus reducing poverty. Colombia, Malawi      Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions  Andrew Jarvis   
1837 Strategic Learning Assessment of the Central and South American Regional Programs of Vredeseilanden Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-02-01  2014-04-30  The strategic learning assessment will contribute to the ability of the organization to fulfill its mission and long term goals as well as positioning VECO as a leader in the ‘post-development era’. This project will conduct a strategic learning assessment for the VECO regional programs in Nicaragua/Honduras and Ecuador/Peru. Ecuador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru      Policy & Institutions  Mark Lundy   
1836 Borderlands Coffee Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-01-01  2016-08-31  In this project the main issue is that farmers increase coffee-related income and create jobs by strengthening the coffee value chain and applying sustainable practices. Farmers build and conserve diverse assets and enhance alternative income sources. Project-generated research influences sourcing and investment practices in coffee industry and donor community. Colombia      Climate Change, Crops  Mark Lundy   
1834 Livestock pest economic geography International Livestock Research Institute  2012-01-01  2013-12-31  The Livestock Pest Economic Geography project works to better understand the spatially-explicit economic costs of livestock pests and diseases and our capacity to ameliorate their impacts. The first goal of the project is to identify the top 20 or so disease/vector systems of economic importance in each of four livestock categories in Africa: cattle, sheep and goats, pigs, and poultry. We will collate information from all of the expert lists that we can access, and use a citation search to determine which pest/disease systems have received the most research attention since 2000. From these ranked lists, we will produce distribution maps to indicate presence or implied absence in each country of the pest/disease systems that rank highest in each of the four livestock categories. This information will then be juxtaposed against spatially explicit measures of livestock and human geographies and disease impacts to help identify the prima facie importance of each disease within each country. This analysis will be published, and the atlas of maps will be made available online. The 20 or so livestock pest/vector systems deemed likely to cause the largest economic losses in this first phase will be given more intensive study in a second phase of the project, where we will more formally address the bio-economic issues of relevance. In early 2013 we plan to bring together relevant experts on livestock pests and diseases for a workshop to identify additional sources of data and technical information of prospective use for our analysis, and to critically review future research priorities and strategies. The ultimate goal is to develop a robust, spatially explicit modeling approach rooted in technical and economic realities and combined with improved data (and data estimation methods), to enable more evidenced-based decision-making about strategic research and other intervention options designed to economically reduce the losses from livestock pests and diseases throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Scientists Darren Kriticos Delia Grace Jason Beddow Jusper Kiplimo Pamela Ochungo Philip Pardey Tania Yonow Partners HarvestChoice – University of Minnesota Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Kenya      Livestock  Delia Grace   
1833 Epidemiology, ecology and socio-economics of disease emergence International Livestock Research Institute  2012-02-01  2017-01-31  A combination of growth and migration is resulting in massive increases in the population of urban and peri-urban zones in Africa. The United Nations has estimated that city populations in Africa will rise from 35% of the total population in 2007 to 51% by 2030. The impacts of this on human welfare, healthcare, sanitation, and other policy-orientated fields has received vast attention, but there has not been a substantive effort to integrate across disciplines, particularly with regard to the impacts of these diverse issues on disease transmission. Objective The overall objective of this project is to understand the mechanisms leading to the introduction of pathogens into urban populations, and their subsequent spread. The focus is on livestock as sources of these pathogens: emerging diseases are likely to be zoonotic in origin, and livestock pathogens, through the close interactions between livestock, their products and people, are at high of risk crossing the species barrier. The focus in this project is on Escherichia coli, as an exemplar of many potential emerging pathogens, which exists in a diversity of hosts, in the environment, on food, in waste etc. The geographical focus is the city of Nairobi, Kenya, and its hinterlands. In the microbiology components, the project takes a landscape genetics approach to understanding E. coli distribution and spread, with a view to understanding how this is affected by environmental and socio-economic factors. Research questions Does urban livestock keeping pre-dispose people to acquiring new or more diverse microbial flora? Is the risk compounded by poverty status or other social factors? How is the microbial flora influenced by the keeping of livestock in these areas? Do supply chains for livestock and livestock products bring people into contact with microbial diversity over and above what they would otherwise experience? Why do people source food from particular places? What social and economic factors define food sourcing in a complex city? What influences the microbial flora to which people are exposed through food? How does the design of complex urban environments influence exposure to microbial flora? How has the city of Nairobi grown, how does it continue to grow, and how does urbanization in the region affect exposure to microbial diversity in the human and animal population? What is the role of per-domestic wildlife in transmission of zoonotic pathogens and the transport of microbial flora? Why do supply chains exist in the way that they do, and how might they change as demand for products changes with urban growth, or as a consequence of legislation? The findings will inform development of policy on urban livestock keeping by improving knowledge of the public health risks and by putting those risks in a wider socio-economic context, including the risks associated with alternative sources of livestock products. Partners African Population and Health Research Center Development Planning Unit, University College London Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations International Institute for Environment and Development Kenya Medical Research Institute Roslin Institute Royal Veterinary College, London University of Liverpool University of Nairobi University of Edinburgh Wellcome Trust Sanger Centre Kenya      Livestock  Eric Fevre  Delia Grace 
1814 Pan-African Bean Research Alliance (PABRA) – Phase 2012-2014 Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2012-01-01  2014-12-31  PABRA’s ultimate goal is to improve food security, nutrition, health, income and livelihood of resource-poor smallholder families. These are the intermediate expected outcomes: Increased and gender equitable utilization of improved and marketable bean varieties, new crop management techniques and micro-nutrient rich bean based products Increased trade by men and women farmers in an equitable manner Increased evidence-based response to bean sector demands and influencing bean policy in a gender equitable manner. Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo Dem. Rep., Congo Rep., Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Robin Buruchara   
1813 Phenotyping Parental Lines and Recombinant Inbred Lines Research Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-09-26  2012-09-26  The main objective of this project is to record phenotype data as described in the manual and make data available to researchers on a weekly basis. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1811 Field Phenotyping for Drought Resistance of the Marker Assisted Recurrent Selection (MARS) Population Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-11-01  2012-10-31  The main objective of this project is to evaluate one Marker Assisted Recurrent Selection (MARS) population under drought and irrigated conditions and to compare the yield components in both conditions. This set of phenotypic information pertaining to the rice adaptation to drought conditions will be collected along with a set of environmental data describing the soil and climatic conditions prevailing during the experiment. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  cecile grenier   
1810 On-the-Job Research Capacity Building for Sustainable Agriculture in Developing Countries Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-12-12  2012-06-15  The main objective of this project is to develop capacity for agricultural research in developing countries. To disseminate new agricultural technologies that are adaptable to local conditions and to local farmers. In addition, to contribute towards increasing world food production through promotion of sustainable agriculture in developing countries. Colombia      Policy & Institutions  Simone Staiger   
1809 Interinstitutional, Multi-Sectoral analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to climate change for the agricultural sector in the upper Cauca River basing impacting adaptation policies Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-09-26  2012-07-31  The main objective of this project is to define a communication strategy at the departmental, regional and sub-sectoral level to disseminate the impacts identified in the Second National Communication for the Andean agricultural sector, generating capacity for the decision making about climate change risks among sectoral leaders (agricultural sub-sector) and regional, departmental and municipal authorities. Colombia      Climate Change, Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1808 Improving the livelihoods of Smallholder Farmers in Drought-prone Areas of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia through Enhanced Grain Legume Production and Productivity – Tropical Legumes II (Phase 2) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-09-01  2014-09-30  This project has as main objective to contribute to the development of improved varieties of cowpea, common bean, groundnut, chickpea, pigeonpea and soybean in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia by expanding, accelerating and enhancing legume breeding programs and seed system. Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1807 Gene Discovery in Cassava for Pest and Disease Resistance Engagement Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-11-01  2012-11-30  This project has as main objective is to discover genes in cassava underlying resistance to cassava brown streak disease and whitefly pests Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Luis Augusto Becerra   
1802 Improving Farmers Livelihoods Through the Scaling-Up of Legume Based Soil Fertility Restoration Technologies Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-06-01  2012-05-31  The main objective of this project is to scale up promising legume based technologies identified during phase I to increase and sustain land productivity in East Africa farming systems for improved livelihoods.  Four specific objectives: To enhance the role of legumes in soil fertility restoration; To identify market channels, constraints and opportunities for increasing farmers access to the national, regional and international grain legume markets; To build the capacity of smallholder farmers and other stakeholders on legume technologies; To scale best-bet legume soil fertility enhancing technologies, market and agroenterprise options Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda      Soils  Saidou Koala   
1801 Improved Forage-Based Livestock Feeding Systems for Smallholder Livelihoods in the Cambodia-Laos-Vietnam (CLV) Development Triangle Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-09-16  2015-09-30  This projects focuses on improving the livelihoods of poor livestock farmers in the development triangle by way of improving the adoption of forage-based livestock feeding and management technologies. This project also looks to enhance awareness of demand, and increase market access for smallholders through the establishment of more effective, and efficient linkages between value-chain stakeholders Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Adrian Bolliger  Adrian Bolliger 
1800 Improvement and evaluation of the existing cassava reference set for Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-06-01  2013-02-28  The overall objective of this is to better describe and make available to NARS breeding programs cassava genetic resources Nigeria      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Luis Augusto Becerra   
1798 BREAD: Fast Breeding for Slow Cycling Crops: Double Haploids in Cassava and Banana/Plantain Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-07-01  2012-06-30  In this project, the objective is to produce doubled haploids in cassava and banana/plantain using centromere engineering. Produce Agrobacterium binary vectors to replace endogenous CENH3 with altered variants in cassava and banana. Create transgenic cassava and banana lines expressing altered CENH3 proteins in place of endogenous CENH3 (putative haploid inducers).  Cross putative haploid inducing lines to wild-type cassava and banana, and assay for haploid progeny. Colombia, Uganda      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Joseph Tohme   
1797 Achieving sustainable Striga control for poor farmers in Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-01  2015-03-31  These are the four main objectives of this project: Establish functional partnerships and innovation platforms to identify and resolve problems related to Striga management in maize-legume based production systems. Use new tools to generate new knowledge to increase the current understanding of the biology and control of Striga. Deploy and disseminate integrated Striga management technologies in maize-legume based systems. Enhance community, local government and national government capacity to participate in the generation, testing and dissemination of improved Striga management practices. Kenya, Nigeria      Soils  Bernard VanLauwe   
1795 Colombia Low Carbon Study Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-08-15  2011-12-30  This project has three main objectives: Overal support in the identification of promising mitigation interventions in the agricultural sector Calculation of the baseline mitigation scenario based on the Cool Farm Tool. Provide cost-effectives analysis for the following mitigation interventions in the agricultural sector. Colombia      Climate Change  Andrew Jarvis   
1794 Quantifying the BNI-residual effect from B. Humidicola on subsequent annual crops Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-02  2012-02-29  Our ongoing and past findings indicate substantial reduction in the soil nitrification potential from cultivation of B. humdicola due to accumulation of BNIs in soil systems. Other research groups working on Hyperrhenia diplandra pasture grasses in West Africa noticed a very stable BNI effect (but not properly quantified yet) on nitrification potential in soils. Thus, the aim of this proposed field study is to characterize the residual-BNI function from B. humidicola (BH) for the stability and intensity of BNI effect on soil nitrification potential, nitrogen-recovery and N-use efficiency in maize and soybean using the BNI-residual effect from a long-term cultivation (> 10 year pasture) of BH pasture. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Soils  Idupulapati Rao   
1792 Managin Water in Rainfed Agriculture: the Key to Food Security in the Greater Mekong Subregion Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-01  2012-03-01  The project will focus on defining climate-related risks to rainfed production; but will explicitly examine a broad range of responses, not restricted to water management. Social and policy aspects are often more significant constraints to sustainable production than biophysical aspects, and it is necessary to take into account production issues such as fertilisers and pest management; and other drivers such as access to markets and changes in prices and demand. Cambodia, China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Water Management  Rod Lefroy  Robyn Johnston 
1791 Measuring and Assessing the Impacts of the Diffusion of Improved Crop Varieties in Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-02-01  2012-11-30  The proposed work of this project contributes to an improved understanding of the impact of food-crop genetics research on the poor and food insecure in Sub-Saharan Africa. A broader and deeper understanding focuses both on the intermediate outcomes of levels of varietal adoption and the dynamics of varietal change, as well as final impacts on poverty and food security Angola, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo Dem. Rep., Congo Rep., Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Robert Santiago Andrade   
1789 The Global Impact of Sown Tropical Grassland and Forage Plants Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-06-24  2013-01-31  This project aims to develop a report of the Assessment of the Globlal Impact of Sown Tropical Grassland and Forage Plants based on Inputs from a Wide Range of Grassland/Forage Scientists and the Private Sector (e.g. companies and graziers). Australia, Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1788 Improving agriculture-based livelihoods in Central Africa through sustainably increased system productivity to enhance income, nutrition security and the environment, CIALCA-II Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-01-01  2011-12-31  This project has three main objectives: Contributing to the work on Banana-Legume Integration Finalize tthe work on AMF innoculation for Banana Tissue Culture Plants Carrying out Plant and Soil Analyses in the context of the above Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo Dem. Rep., Congo Rep., Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe      Crops, Land Management, Soils  Bernard VanLauwe   
1787 Towards a Latin America and Caribbean Knowledge Based Bio-Economy in Partnership with Europe (ALCUE-KBBE) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-04  2013-11-03  The general objective of the project is to establish a platform bringing together regional and continental organizations involved in research funding and implementation, as well as other relevant stakeholders from the public and private sector and the civil society, in an effort to generate relevant information for the design and implementation of specific plans and projects, included the needed R&D and set the basis for the establishments of an enabling policy and institutional environment, as well as, for the development consolidation and best cross fertilization (synergy) of the KBBE in both the regions. Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, France, Germany, Mexico, Netherlands, Portugal, Uruguay      Agrobiodiversity, Policy & Institutions  Joseph Tohme   
1786 Improving Bean Production and Utilization by Smallholder Farmers Through Integration of Climbing Beans in the Smallholder Farming Systems in Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-03-01  2014-02-28  This project seeks to develop a model for integrating new improved varieties of climbing beans in intercropping system and winter cropping for increased beans production and utilization. It further addresses the problems of diseases, pests and drought that lead to losses in bean germplasm through production of clean seed in winter under irrigation. Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Rowland Chirwa   
1785 Dissemination of Provitamin A Maize in Zambia’s Eastern Province Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-01  2012-04-30  This program will reduce micronutrient malnutrition by introducing orange maize high in provitamin A in Zambia’s Eastern Province. Zambia      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Robin Buruchara   
1784 Maize/Bean Research in Uganda Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-01  2012-04-30  Maize and beans are two strategic value chains for USAID's Feed the Future (FtF) program in Uganda. They have been selected for their potential to increase household incomes, ensure food security, and improve nutrition status for millions of Ugandans. Uganda      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Robin Buruchara   
1782 Research and Distribution of B. Humidicola and Tetraploid B. Ruziziensis x Various Accesions of B. Decumbens or B. Brizantha Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-06-01  2017-06-01  The purpose of this project is to ensure that hybrids being developed in CIAT's tropical forages program are evaluated and commercialized as effectively and widely possible to help CIAT achieve the broadest possible impact. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Michael Peters  Michael Peters 
1770 Harnessing water-use efficient bio-energy crops for enhancing livelihood opportunities of smallholder farmers Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-04  2010-12-31  This project involves a wide range of activities working for the improvement of varieties, production systems, and waste management, in order to improve smallholder livelihoods in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Some activities include the development of high-biomass cassava, the fine-tuning of production packages, and the facilitation of the development of mechanisms to allow effective production of biofuels from agroindustrial waste. Brazil, Colombia, Ghana, Nigeria      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Hernan Ceballos   
1767 Improved forage-based feeding systems for smallholder livelihoods in the Cambodia-Laos-Vietnam development Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-09-16  2015-09-30  This project will focus on improving smallholders’ production skills, increasing demand awareness, and establishing effective and efficient linkages among value-chain stakeholders to gain wider market access Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam      Agrobiodiversity, Market Access  Tassilo Tiemann   
1766 Quantifying the BNI-residual effect from Brachiaria humidicola on subsequent annual crops Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-05-02  2012-02-29  This field study  aims to characterize the residual effect of biological nitrogen inhibition (BNI) from Brachiaria humidicola to determine the stability and intensity of the BNI effect on soil nitrification potential, nitrogen (N) recovery, and N-use efficiency in maize, based on the observed BNI-residual effect from a long-term cultivation (>= 10-year) of B. humidicola pasture. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Idupulapati Rao   
1765 Technological development and innovation for sustainable and competitive development of the Orinoquia Colombian region: Climate change adaptation and mitigation model for regional production systems Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-01-28  2014-12-19  The project aims to develop methodologies to assess climate change risks, as well as adaptation and mitigation strategies, addressing carbon sequestration, biological-nitrogen inhibition, plant physiology, and biotechnology. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change  Glenn Hyman  Idupulapati Rao 
1764 Technological development and innovation for sustainable and competitive development of the Orinoquia Colombian region: Evaluation and development of new forage material to be introduced into cattle production systems Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-01-28  2014-06-27  This project seeks to boost productivity, competitiveness, and sustainability of the production systems being used in the Orinoquia Colombian region by introducing new forage material into cattle production systems. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1763 Global impact of sown tropical grassland and forage plants Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-06-24  2013-01-31  CIAT will comprehensively review the impact of introduced (sown or naturalized) tropical grasses and legumes, and will also conduct a meta-analysis of related global economic benefits. The findings will be shared at a special session during the 22nd International Grassland Congress, to be held in Sydney, Australia, in 2013 Australia, Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1762 Spontaneous silvopastoral landscapes Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-08-15  2014-01-31  The global extent of tropical forests is increasingly declining, thus agriculture-dominated landscapes now cover ~50% of the tropical biome. In this context, the ability to understand and influence tropical biodiversity largely depends on the understanding of actively-managed landscapes. Since pastures cover most agricultural lands in the neotropics, CIAT’s tropical forages program is keen to research how ecological and human variables correlate with this trend. Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1761 Breeding of Brachiaria ruziziensis x various accessions of B. decumbens or B. brizantha Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-06-01  2017-06-01  CIAT’s Brachiaria breeding program aims to develop and release superior apomictic genotypes as commercial cultivars that will be adopted by farmers in the tropics. Through repeated cycles of hybridization and selection, the program seeks to produce apomictic hybrids with enhanced expression of resistance (antibiosis) to spittlebugs, tolerance to combined stress factors  (aluminum and drought), high commercial seed yield,  resistance to Rhizoctonia foliar blight, forage of high nutritional quality, high forage yield, and tolerance to waterlogging. Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1760 TL2: Enhancing grain legumes productivity, production and income of poor farmers in drought-prone areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia (headquarters component) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-08-15  2010-08-31  This project targets crop breeding and delivery efforts to enhance impact on the livelihoods of the poor in drought-prone regions of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia as well as developing sustainable seed production and delivery systems for reaching the poor. Specific crops under investigation include: groundnut, cowpea, bean, chickpea, and pigeon pea. Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Zimbabwe      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1758 TL1: Improving tropical legume productivity for marginal environments in sub-Saharan Africa (headquarters component) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-05-01  2014-05-31  This project aims to contribute to the development of improved legume varieties in sub-Saharan Africa by developing genomic resources and molecular markers for traits of importance, and by implementing modern breeding in sub-Saharan Africa. Being a collaborative project, CIAT's specific role is to improve common bean productivity for marginal environments in sub-Saharan Africa. This project will address this issue along with additional important biotic stress resistance traits through five activities.   Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Zimbabwe      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1752 Improved food and nutritional security from better utilisation of dairy cattle breed or cross-breed types in Mali International Livestock Research Institute  2012-01-01  2014-12-31  Within certain dairy production systems within Mali, such as in peri-urban Bamako, the indigenous West African Zebu breeds of cattle (such as the Maure, Azaouak and Zebu Peul) are being crossed with recently introduced dairy breeds from Europe (such as the Holstein-Friesian or Montbeliard), resulting in farmers keeping a range of breed types. There is, however, little known about the relative performance of the different breed-types from a socio-economic viewpoint. Whilst animals with a higher proportion of exotic blood have the genetic potential to produce more milk, they are less adapted to the local environmental conditions and require greater inputs (such as feed and health-care) in comparison to the indigenous animals. Previously, it has been difficult to quantitatively access the socio-economic performance of the different dairy breed-types within in-situ (peri-urban or village) settings, as the breed-mix of individual animals cannot be determined from phenotypic observation and pedigree records are lacking. New genomic approaches, however, provide a solution to this problem as they enable the breed composition of individual animals to be determined from DNA information. By combining genomic-based breed information with economic and performance information from on-farm monitoring of the same animals (obtained from both baseline and longitudional surveys), the most appropriate breed / cross-breed type for a particular production environment can be identified. Utilisation of the most appropriate breed -type is critical to sustainably increasing the productivity of the dairy sector. The objectives of this project are to: Determine the most appropriate dairy breed/ cross-breed types for peri-urban dairy production systems in Mali, and disseminate this information; Characterise the dairy germplasm production chain, and related policies, and use this information to develop a strategy for strengthened dairy germplasm production and delivery systems; Enhance local human, institutional and organizational capacity on accessing and promoting different breeds/cross-breeds of livestock. The project is embedded in the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish The project is funded by the the Finnish Government’s Food Africa Programme Mali    MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Université de Bamako, University of Helsinki  Livestock  Karen Marshall   
1750 Rapid assessment of potential benefits to human health and nutrition from research on livestock and fish market chains in Asia and Africa International Livestock Research Institute  2012-06-01  2013-05-31  In developing countries, animal source foods support the nutrition and livelihoods of millions of rural and urban poor for whom livestock and fish value chains are also promising pathways out of poverty. Less attention has been given to the relation between animal source foods value chains and human health and nutrition, especially impacts of food-borne disease and nutritional security. The CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Improved Nutrition and Health is developing an impact pathway by which agriculture can enhance nutrition and mitigate health risks through value chain research. This requires new tools and approaches to prioritize which can be applied to informal markets in which quality and safety are diverse and where there can be trade-offs between income, employment, nutritional benefits and disease risks. For these informal and emerging value chains, market access and income are as much an objective as the quality and safety of foods produced and consumed. Key questions to be answered include: Among the wide range of potential hazards associated with animal source foods products in informal systems, which are likely to have the greatest risks to human health? Which have the most impact in terms of limiting the availability of food critical to the nutritional security of the poor and constraining development of the value chain, particularly livelihood opportunities of the poor who produce or handle those products? What are the key constraints to supply and demand of safe and nutritious foods? What are the potential health and nutrition benefits of research that seeks to overcome these risks and constraints? Research objectives Development of tools and approaches for assessing value chains in relation to nutrition and health Assessment of food quality and safety research priorities in value chains with high potential for pro-poor transformation and of interest to the CGIAR and the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR). The value chains have been chosen for their ability to generate information to inform research and development. They are pig meat in Vietnam, dairy in Tanzania and fish in Egypt, together comprising one third of the value chains targeted by the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish. Research partners Central Laboratory for Aquaculture Research, Egypt Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania Vietnam School of Public Health Funding Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research Egypt, Tanzania, Vietnam      Aquaculture, Livestock  Delia Grace  Fred Unger, Nguyen Viet Hung, Kristina Roesel, Lusato Kurwijila, Lucy Lapar, Laurian Unnevehr, Malcolm Beveridge, Malcolm Dickson, Thomas Randolph 
1748 Cereal System Initiative South Asia International Rice Research Institute  2008-12-01  2012-07-30  Given the persistence of massive poverty in South Asia, the project will improve cereal productivity and farm income in four countries of South Asia. The Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) project will provide an overall strategy and a new umbrella for contributing new science and technologies to accelerating short- and long-term cereal production growth in South Asia’s most important grain baskets. It builds on technologies developed and lessons learned from the Rice-Wheat Consortium (RWC), the Irrigated Rice research Consortium (IRRC), and many other investments in agricultural R&D by both public and private sectors. Through creating and facilitating innovative public-private sector partnerships in key “hubs”, the project will boost the deployment of existing varieties, hybrids, crop management technologies, and market information. CSISA will focus initially on 9 delivery hubs and 4 research platforms in areas of Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Nepal that represent key intensive cereal production systems. The hubs provide a basis for active learning about mechanisms for rapid adoption and intensification of improved cereal seed and crop management practices, for understanding critical components of public-private sector partnerships, and for developing business plans and supporting policies to stimulate private-sector investments. Improved cultivars and hybrids of maize, rice, and wheat selected under conservation agriculture practices will be developed and management concepts for future cereal systems will be designed and evaluated, alongside policy analysis and advocacy, and capacity building at all levels. By the end of year, 40,000 farmers will achieve a yield increase of at least 0.5 t/ha on 50,000 ha and an aditional 20,000 farmers achieve a yield increase of at least 1.0 t/ha on 20,000 ha. In its second phase the project will expand through Project-Related Investment models driven by the key project partners and reaching up to 500 hubs across the region within a decade. Project objectives: 1. Widespread delivery and adaptation of production and postharvest technologies to increase  cereal production and raise incomes. 2. Crop and resource management practices for sustainable future cereal-based systems. 3. High-yielding, abiotic stress-tolerant, and disease- and insect-resistant rice varieties and hybrids for current and future cereal and mixed crop-livestock systems. 4. High-yielding, abiotic stress-tolerant, disease-resistant wheat varieties for current and future cereal and mixed crop-livestock systems. 5. High-yielding, heat-tolerant and disease-resistant maize inbred lines and hybrids for current and future cereal and mixed crop-livestock systems. 6. Technology targeting and improved policies for inclusive agricultural growth. 7. Creating a new generation of scientists and professional agronomists for cereal systems research and management. 8. Project management, communication and impact assessment The project forms an important part of the  CGIAR Research Programs on livestock and fish Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)  Crops  Iain Wright   
1744 Generating evidence to support enhanced traditional dairying in Northeast India International Livestock Research Institute  2011-09-01  2013-02-28  Millions of small-scale farmers, many of them women, supply the surging demand for animal source foods generating huge benefits to their livelihoods and family nutrition. India is presently the largest milk producer in the world: 75% of rural households have bovines, 60% of dairy animals are owned by small farmers, and two thirds of marketed milk goes through the informal sector. However, despite the importance of the informal milk sector, policy towards it is generally hostile. Informality leaves actors vulnerable to extortion, decreases investment in technology, chills the flow of innovation, and, paradoxically, makes foods less safe. The huge burden of food-borne disease and the high level of pathogens in informal sector milk are well documented, as are the substantial, yet avoidable, milk losses from spoilage and spillage. The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and partners have developed an action research approach to help poor people get more from the traditional dairy sector. This involves engaging with policymakers, assessing health risks and improving standards of informal sector producers and value chain agents through training and certification. The approach has been very successful in East Africa and more recently has been extended to India. General objective To evaluate the impact of a self-sustaining model for improving the performance traditional dairy through certification and training in order to generate evidence for scaling-up and scaling-out as well as provide recommendations that will help continue to improve performance of the traditional dairy in Assam. Specific objectives To rigorously evaluate a model for improving the traditional dairy sector (based on training and certification of informal value chain actors) by assessing the impacts on capacity of value chain actors and net benefits accruing to milk value chains and consumers. To understand and document the process of policy influence and change which supports local ownership and sustainability of this model for improving the traditional dairy sector. To assess the economic impact and cost-benefit of the model for improving the traditional dairy sector. To gather lessons from the Assam experience to inform dairy development in other parts of India and in Bangladesh. Funder: OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID) India      Livestock  Delia Grace  Amos Omore, Derek Baker, Rameswar Deka 
1743 Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots International Livestock Research Institute  2012-01-01  2012-04-30  This short-term study (January to April 2012) reviews and updates existing knowledge on poverty and on poverty and zoonoses hotspots. The specific objective of the study is to provide evidence on where (globally) the risk to the poor from zoonoses is greatest, to enable prioritization of appropriate target locations for research implementation and uptake, based on greatest risk. Activities Expert consultation on already published maps of poverty, livestock and zoonoses hotspots with the aim of achieving a preliminary qualitative evaluation of which countries/regions need updating. Collation of additional data from countries/regions undergoing rapid change in demographics, location of livestock units, biodiversity and those forecast to suffer most from climate change. Update/refresh of the ILRI 2002 publication, Mapping poverty and livestock in the developing world. Update/refresh of the map by Jones et al. (2008) in the journal Nature: Jones, Kate E et al. "Global trends in emerging infectious diseases." Nature 451.7181 (2008): 990-993. Identification of priority zoonoses which pose risk to the poor. Development of maps showing hotspots for poverty, livestock and zoonoses. Funding: UK Department for International Development (DFID) Kenya      Livestock  Delia Grace  Lucy Lapar, Mario Herrero, Mohammed Said, Pamela Ochungo 
1742 Reducing disease risks and improving food safety in smallholder pig value chains in Vietnam International Livestock Research Institute  2011-01-01  2015-12-31  This project aims to better opportunities and incomes from smallholder pig value chains by generating evidence that leads to more successful management of the risks to both human and animal health that currently hamper the pig sector in Vietnam. A previous project in Vietnam (Improving the competitiveness of pig producers in an adjusting Vietnam market) comprehensively characterized the smallholder pig sector; the project found that pork comprises three-quarters of meat consumed and is supplied mainly by smallholders, mostly women; pork production delivers substantial benefits to poor households; and smallholders are efficient producers. However, pork contains high levels of pathogens and there is growing concern about food safety and animal disease among consumers and national policymakers alike. These concerns have already led to policy that favours industrialization and threatens smallholder access to markets. Yet research by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and partners has shown that smallholder value chains are not only efficient, but safe. Research has a key role in generating evidence on the real impacts of pig disease and better ways of managing disease risks that are based on incentives rather than regulations. This project addresses the evidence gaps that lead to unsupportive policy and through partnerships, capacity building and communication provides a pathway by which evidence can influence policy and practice, enhancing and safeguarding the smallholder pig sector in Vietnam. The project forms an important part of two CGIAR Research Programs: one on livestock and fish and the other on agriculture for improved nutrition and health. Objectives To assess impacts of pork-borne diseases on human health and the livestock sector. To develop and test market-based innovations to improve management of human and animal health risks. To communicate the lessons learned to sustainably improve capacity to assess and manage risks in the pork value chain. Research questions What are the health risks and economic costs of pork-borne diseases in Vietnam? What is the added utility of risk-based approaches to food safety and pig disease over current hazard-based management? What is the role of market-based innovations to improve management of human and animal health risks in the smallholder pig value chains? Partners Hanoi School of Public Health Hanoi University of Agriculture Institute of Policy and Strategy for Agriculture and Rural Development National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Vietnam National Institute of Veterinary Research, Vietnam Oxfam Vietnam Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development Vietnam Ministry of Health Funding: Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research Vietnam      Livestock  Delia Grace  Derek Baker, Fred Unger, Nguyen Viet Hung, Lucy Lapar 
1741 Managing risk in emerging pork markets: An international South-South symposium International Livestock Research Institute  2012-04-23  2012-04-25  On 23-25 April 2012, researchers and development actors from the pig sectors of Southeast Asia and East Africa gathered in Hanoi, Vietnam for an international South-South symposium on managing risk in emerging pork markets. The meeting also discussed new developments in managing food safety and biosecurity in the informal pig sector. The workshop, organized by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in conjunction with the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), saw government ministry representatives, scientists and specialists in pig health, animal health, public health, economics and ecology, discuss their research on public health innovations and how they can be best implemented through the CGIAR Research Programs on livestock and fish and agriculture for improved nutrition and health. These two programs have identified improvements in pork production, productivity and safety in the smallholder-dominated pig markets of Vietnam, Uganda and the northeast Indian state of Nagaland as initial areas of focus. With pig markets in the three locations heavily weighted towards smallholder producers, the workshop paid particular attention to the challenges facing the informal pig sector. The three-day gathering saw participants share short papers and presentations on the lessons learnt from the following key areas: Food safety in informal markets Integrated assessment and management of pig health risks in Laos Veterinary public health research in SE Asia Market-based approaches to food safety Sharing lessons from pig production between SE Asia and NE India Managing pig risks from a farming systems perspective Best practices for value chain upgrading for food safety: some examples for selected livestock commodities View photos from the symposium and field trip Vietnam      Livestock, Market Access  Delia Grace  Danilo Pezo, Fred Unger, Jeffrey Gilbert, Lucy Lapar, Rainer Asse, Rameswar Deka 
1739 Catalysing the emerging smallholder pig value chains in Uganda to increase rural incomes and assets International Livestock Research Institute  2012-01-01  2013-12-31  Background Over the past two decades pig production has become an increasingly important activity in Uganda. In the last 30 years the pig population has increased from 0.19 to 2.3 million, and there are more than 1 million households raising pigs. In 2011, Uganda had the highest per capita consumption of pork in sub-Saharan Africa (3.4 kg/person per year). The majority of pigs are kept by women in smallholder households, as part of the large informal subsector, with limited access to technology information and services. Other value chain actors are also constrained by limited access to information, inputs and services. Goal To improve livelihoods, incomes and assets of smallholder pig producers (particularly women) in a sustainable manner through increased productivity, reduced risk and improved market access in pig value chains. Objectives To identify market opportunities for pork in Uganda and the multiple factors preventing smallholder pig producers from exploiting those opportunities, with a focus on constraints such as animal diseases, scarce feed resources and poor performance of markets and services. To develop and pilot test a set of integrated packages for smallholder pig production and market access for specific production systems, resource profiles and market settings in Uganda. To document, communicate and promote appropriate evidence-based models for sustainable, pro-poor pig value chains. Uganda    Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA), Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), Makerere University, Uganda  Livestock  Danilo Pezo  Ben Lukuyu, Brigitte Maass, Edward Okoth, Eric Fevre, Karen Marshall, Phil Toye, Thomas Randolph 
1738 Measuring and mitigating the risk of mycotoxins in maize and dairy products for poor consumers in Kenya International Livestock Research Institute  2012-05-01  2015-07-31  Each year, over 4.5 billion people are at risk of chronic exposure to mycotoxins. These people mainly live in developing countries where exposure to mycotoxins is not sufficiently controlled. The goal of this project, the fifth of seven work packages of the FoodAfrica Programme, is to reduce the risk of mycotoxin contamination in staple crops in Kenya. To achieve this goal, cost-effective and incentive-based mycotoxin control strategies and solutions will be developed for the use of poor farmers and other actors within the feed-dairy chain. The principal project activities are: Integrated risk and economic assessment of the Kenyan feed dairy chain Investigation of technologies and strategies to reduce mycotoxins risk in the feed-dairy chain Impact assessment of a package of post-harvest strategies for reducing aflatoxins in maize Evidence dissemination and capacity building are included in each activity. The capacity of local researchers and postgraduate students is developed through participation in designing surveys, field work and data analysis. In addition, participatory methods are applied to develop and test strategies to mitigate the risk of mycotoxins in the feed-food chain. Farmer participatory research engages farmers in action research on their fields so they can learn and adopt new technologies and disseminate the knowledge to other farmers. Partner institutions MTT AgriFood Research Finland International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) University of Nairobi Funding: Finnish Ministry of Foreign Affairs Kenya      Livestock  Delia Grace  Anima Sirma, Daniel Senerwa, Johanna Lindahl, Mohamadou Fadiga, Erastus K. Kangethe, Sara Ahlberg, Tezira Lore 
1737 Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa International Livestock Research Institute  2012-02-01  2015-07-31  Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa is an Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA)-funded research programme designed to deliver much-needed, cutting-edge science on the relationships between ecosystems, zoonoses, health and wellbeing, with the objective of helping people move out of poverty and promoting social justice. It focuses on four emerging or re-emerging zoonotic diseases in four diverse African ecosystems: Henipavirus infection in Ghana Rift Valley fever in Kenya Lassa fever in Sierra Leone Trypanosomiasis in Zambia and Zimbabwe Its innovative, holistic approach brings together natural and social scientists to build an evidence base designed to inform global and national policy players seeking effective, integrated approaches to control and check disease outbreaks. The Drivers of Disease Consortium comprises over 30 researchers working in 17 institutes across Africa, Europe and the US and includes researchers in the environmental, biological, social, political, and human and animal health sciences. They will generate new knowledge on: Ecosystem change How ecology and people’s interactions with ecosystems affect disease emergence Disease transmission and exposure The partner institutes are: ESRC STEPS Centre, Brighton, UK University of Cambridge, UK Institute of Zoology, London University of Edinburgh University College, London Wildlife Division of the Forestry Commission, University of Ghana International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) University of Nairobi Kenema Government Hospital, Sierra Leone Njala University, Sierra Leone Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries Development, Zambia University of Zambia Ministry of Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development, Zimbabwe University of Zimbabwe Stockholm Resilience Centre Tulane University, USA Funding: The programme is funded by a £3.2m grant from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID). Ghana, Kenya, Zambia, Zimbabwe      Livestock  Bernard Bett  Delia Grace, Steve Kemp, Thomas Randolph 
1736 Adapting dairy market hubs for pro-poor smallholder value chains in Tanzania International Livestock Research Institute  2012-01-01  2012-12-31  Smallholder dairying offers several pro-poor benefits for rural livelihoods and nutritional security. These include opportunities for intensification and enhanced productivity and incomes, employment in services and marketing, and nutrition for smallholder producer households as well as urban consumers served by informal markets. Unlike most crop and livestock enterprises, its benefits throughout the value chain are generated daily rather than seasonally. In many cases especially in short value chains, benefits flow disproportionately to women, the landless, and other marginalized groups, an issue that has to be addressed with increasing commercialization. The goal of this project is to achieve inclusive growth and reduced poverty and vulnerability among dairy dependent livelihoods in relevant rural areas in Tanzania. The one-year inception phase of this project (January to December 2012) aims to provide proof of concept that pre-commercialized, marginalized smallholder men and women can be targeted successfully. If the project successfully establishes a proof of concept for this type of pro-poor strategy based on dairy market hubs, it will guide and accelerate implementation of future larger scale dairy development projects over a further four-year period. The project is designed to support the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish for the Tanzania dairy value chain. Activities during the inception phase (2012) Assess the current status of the Tanzanian dairy sector and identify appropriate entry points and partners for promoting a more pro-poor development orientation. Develop a strategy for strengthening the policy environment to better support pro-poor dairy development, capitalizing on ongoing engagement with key policy actors and previous successes in Kenya and Uganda. Identify sites appropriate for piloting pro-poor dairy development interventions that have been successful elsewhere in East Africa, and assess how those interventions need to be adapted to the Tanzanian context. Activities over five years Inform policy on appropriate role for pro-poor smallholder-based informal sector value chains in dairy sector development. Generate and communicate evidence on business and organizational options for increasing participation of resource-poor male and female households in dairy value chains. Develop scalable value chains approaches with improved organization and institutions serving resource-poor male and female smallholder dairy households. Funding: Irish Aid Tanzania    Sokoine University of Agriculture - Tanzania, Tanzania Dairy Board (TDB)  Market Access  Amos Omore  Lusato Kurwijila 
1735 Health, environmental change and adaptive capacity: mapping, examining and anticipating future risks of water-related vector-borne diseases in eastern Africa International Livestock Research Institute  2011-01-01  2014-12-31  Outbreaks of water-related, vector-borne diseases have complex relationships with environmental conditions. As environmental conditions change, such as through climate and land use changes, then the incidence of disease outbreaks is likely to change. Although all those living in areas where conditions become conducive to disease outbreaks are vulnerable, generally the most marginalised members of society are at greatest risk. The HEALTHY FUTURES project aims to minimize these risks by improving our ability to predict and to communicate the extent and severity of future outbreaks under different environmental change scenarios. The project focuses on three water-related, high-impact vector-borne diseases (malaria, Rift Valley fever and schistosomiasis) in eastern Africa. It takes into account environmental/climatic trends and changes in socio-economic conditions to predict future risk to these diseases. The project includes work packages on climate and disease modelling, vulnerability mapping and decision support. Research questions What are the environmental factors determining distribution and activity of the relevant vectors and pathogens in eastern Africa? To what extent are outbreaks in the three target vector-borne diseases also a reflection of socio-economic conditions, including migration, form of settlement and conflict? To what extent have these influencing factors varied in the documented past and what have been the disease impacts of these variations? To what extent does the actual distribution of transmission and outbreak of the three target diseases match the potential distribution, and what factors appear to determine the difference?  How are the transmission and outbreak of the three target diseases likely to vary according to internationally accepted scenarios of environmental conditions? How is the spatial interaction of the risk of disease transmission and outbreaks amongst highly heterogeneous socio-economic conditions, cultures and communities likely to influence vulnerability to disease impacts? What are the main barriers restricting the abilities of health and veterinary services to respond to warnings of heightened risk of a disease outbreak, and how might these barriers be best overcome? What are the implications for other parts of Africa and for Europe of predicted changes in the distribution and emergence of the three target vector-borne diseases in the study area? The HEALTHY FUTURES consortium consists of 15 partner institutions, eight of which are based in Africa and seven in Europe. Trinity College Dublin is the coordinator of the project. Funding: European Union ILRI contact: Bernard Bett   Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda      Ecosystem Management  David Taylor  An Notenbaert, Abisalom Omolo, Bernard Bett, John Gachohi, Jusper Kiplimo, Jeff Mariner, Wachira Theuri 
1732 Improvement and diversification of Somali livestock trade and marketing International Livestock Research Institute  2005-10-01  2008-09-30  The rationale for this project is based on what is considered to be a high but currently under-exploited potential for reaping greater benefits for stakeholders in the Somali livestock sector. This project therefore aims to contribute to improved Somali pastoral livelihoods by enhancing access of producers and traders to livestock export marketing support services, and fostering participation of Somali pastoralists in more effective, accountable and competent rural institutions. The main activities include: developing an inventory of marketing chains, institutions and agents from primary markets to export, defining grading standards for Somali livestock and livestock products to promote export, and assisting rural institutions to disseminate information related to livestock marketing at local and national levels. Objectives The key result that ILRI is contributing to delivering is in understanding and pilot testing quality control systems for livestock and livestock products. This will be done through: Identifying critical intervention points along livestock market chains for strengthening capacity of actors and quality assurance services. Identifying options for building the capacity of rural institutions for planning livestock marketing services. These include: Strategies to monitor flow of export quality livestock through district and regional markets Approaches to developing a common understanding among stakeholders of different grades and quality standards of Somali breeds for export Options for viable livestock marketing information systems Study sites: Four zones in Somalia (Somaliland, Puntland, central and southern Somalia) Partner organization: Terra Nuova Funding: European Commission and the Government of Denmark Somalia      Livestock, Market Access  Amos Omore  Asfaw Negassa, Mohammad Jabbar 
1731 Livestock and irrigation value chains for Ethiopian smallholders (LIVES) International Livestock Research Institute  2012-04-01  2016-03-31  The project Livestock and irrigation value chains for Ethiopian smallholders (LIVES) is an initiative designed by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) and their national partners to build upon the success of the Canadian International Development Agency-funded project, Improving Productivity and Market Success of Smallholders in Ethiopia (IPMS). Since 2005, IPMS has helped to create in its pilot areas an enabling environment in which the public sector, smallholder farmers and private-sector agents are empowered to increase the production and productivity of crops and livestock through participatory, market-oriented development. The successes resulted from applying innovation systems approaches to identify and exploit opportunities in commodity value chains. LIVES will not only build on these lessons but also introduce new approaches and interventions, and will scale up and out, focusing on a more limited number of value chains, and emphasizing the development of sustained capacity that will continue to have impact beyond the life of the project.   Goal To contribute to enhanced income and gender equitable wealth creation for smallholders and other value chain actors through increased and sustained market offtake of high-value livestock and irrigated crop commodities.   Purpose To improve competitiveness, sustainability and equity in value chains for selected high-value livestock and irrigated crop commodities in target areas of four regions of Ethiopia.   Objectives To facilitate the identification, targeting and promotion of improved technologies and organizational and institutional innovations to develop the value chains of selected high-value livestock and irrigated crop commodities; To improve the capacity of the value chain actors and the support services at the different administrative levels (from kebele [neighbourhood] to national level) to develop the selected value chains and respond to emerging challenges and opportunities; To improve generation, access, flow and use of knowledge relevant to the value chains within and amongst the different administrative levels (from kebele to national level); To generate knowledge through action-oriented research on and synthesis of lessons learnt about value-chain development; and To facilitate the promotion and dissemination of principles and good practices for the development of value chains.   Funding: Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)     Ethiopia    International Water Management Institute (IWMI)  Livestock, Market Access  Dirk Hoekstra  Azage Tegegne, Berhanu Gebremdhin, Steve Staal 
1728 Safe Food, Fair Food 2: From capacity building to implementation International Livestock Research Institute  2012-03-01  2015-02-28  Millions of small-scale farmers efficiently supply the great majority of the meat, milk and fish market in Africa. Surging demand for livestock products and changing consumer demands (the 'Livestock Revolution') provide an opportunity to set poor farmers on pathways out of poverty, but also threaten the continued presence of smallholder farmers in increasingly demanding markets. While the presence of food safety hazards (such as microbial pathogens and residues) in informally-marketed food is high, the risk to human health is mostly unknown and current food safety management is both ineffective and inequitable. Risk-based approaches for assessing and managing food safety offer a powerful new method for reducing the enormous health burden imposed by food-borne disease, while taking into account other societal goals such as pro-poor agri-food sector development and food and nutritional security. The ultimate goal of this second phase of the Safe Food, Fair Food project (Safe Food, Fair Food 2) is the improvement of livelihoods of poor producers and consumers by reducing the health risks and increasing the livelihood benefits associated with meat, milk and fish value chains. Its purpose is furthering research into the practical application of risk analysis and economic and social methods by food safety stakeholders and value chain actors, improving food safety and market participation of the poor in informal markets for livestock products in sub-Saharan Africa. The project contributes to this with outputs at two scales: At the level of meat, milk and fish value chains, it will pioneer and test a practical, whole-value-chain application of risk-based approaches to food safety in selected countries which are the focus of the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish. It will develop, test and communicate the technologies and methods to improve food safety and enhance smallholder market access. At regional scale, it will work through the food safety ‘champions’ supported in the completed phase to better incorporate risk analysis and economic valuation methods into food safety policy, commercial practice and veterinary education. The project will work in four countries (Ethiopia, Mali, Tanzania and Uganda) and with university and research networks and economic communities in East, West and southern Africa. It will build directly on previous work supported by the BMZ-funded Safe Food, Fair Food project that increased capacity and generated evidence for improving food safety in eight African countries, training over 50 food safety stakeholders and supporting 20 post-graduate research projects. Funding: Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development Project coordinator: Kristina Roesel Ethiopia, Mali, Tanzania, Uganda    Addis Ababa University, Freie Universität Berlin- Germany, Makerere University, Uganda, Sokoine University of Agriculture - Tanzania, University of Nairobi  Livestock, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Delia Grace  Amos Omore, Derek Baker, Kohei Makita, Kristina Roesel, Saskia Hendrickx, Tezira Lore 
1657 Watershed Evaluation for Sustainable Use of Sloping Agricultural Land in the Southern Philippines World Agroforestry Centre  2011-05-01  2015-10-31  The aim of this project is to enable improved planning of agricultural development in upland watersheds in the southern Philippines such that agricultural production can be increased and watersheds can be protected - precursors to reducing rural poverty and improving livelihoods. This aim will be achieved through the following objectives: 1. Develop and apply efficient methods to characterise the Cabulig (Misamis Oriental), Inabanga (Bohol) and Billabong watersheds (NSW) to include biophysical and socio-economic information, with particular emphasis on mapping land and soil attributes using digital technology. 2. Develop improved approaches to analysing the suitability of sloping land for agricultural intensification within a watershed context. 3. Inform and enhance local land use planning processes at both the watershed and community scales in Cabulig and Inabanga watersheds. 4. Design and implement on-going monitoring programs in the Philippine watersheds that allows critical assessment of the adoption and impacts of land use planning. Philippines  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Rodel Lasco   
1662 Mapping Interventions and Assessing Financing Mechanisms and Institutional Frameworks for Sustainable Promotion of Rainwater Harvesting World Agroforestry Centre  2011-07-01  2011-12-31  The primary objective of this project is to conduct a comprehensive mapping of successful Rain Water Harvesting (RWH) interventions and detailed assessment of financing mechanisms and institutional frameworks for RWH in Kenya so as to generate scientific knowledge and develop tool for policy makers and planners, practitioners, donors and stakeholders to use in targeting future RWH investments in Kenya and beyond thereby contributing to Millennium Development goals 1, 3, and 7. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2    Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Malesu Maimbo  Alex Oduor 
1663 From Ridge to Reef: An Ecosystem Based Approach to Biodiversity Conservation and Development in the Philippines World Agroforestry Centre  2011-02-04  2013-01-03  The project will work around three themes that will directly address problems of coastal communities: a) Reversing degradation of coastal resources, b) Enhancing livelihoods of coastal people; and c)Capacity building and information/data base management. To be able to do this the proposed action will have eight specific components directly addressing the three themes indicated above namely: 1: Understanding material transfers from watersheds and reducing ‘downstream’ effects of agriculture and forestry on coastal aquatic ecosystems 2: Addressing non-optimal use of resources through valuation and “environmental payments” 3: Identifying, mapping and strengthening management of critical coastal habitats 4: Understanding the factors determining livelihoods for poor coastal people and facilitate the application of ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF) 5: Restoring production from capture fisheries 6: Developing technologies for alternative or supplementary livelihoods for coastal people 7: Resource mapping (Biodiversity Information System) for effective resource management and monitoring 8: Capacity Building in Biodiversity Conservation and Natural Resources Management Philippines  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-4, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Agrobiodiversity, Ecosystem Management, Fisheries, Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Rodel Lasco   
1664 Provide Information of the Economic Benefits of Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) Practices and other Socio-Cultural Benefits World Agroforestry Centre  2011-03-31  2013-05-31  The goal of the project is to provide information on the economic benefits of farmer managed natural regeneration (FMNR) practices and other socio-economic benefits to guide decisions on whether, where, and how to scale up the practice to other dryland and sub-humid areas. The primary aim of the project is to quantify the economic benefits and identify other socio-cultural benefits from farmer managed natural regeneration process in the Sahel. The specific research questions to be answered are: 1. Economic benefits: what is the level of economic benefits that communities and households obtain from FMNR? 2. Variations in benefits: how do these benefits differ across different contexts, such as aridity, access to markets and dominant system and across different communities and household types? 3. Constraints to expansion: In the presence of FMNR transformation, why is FMNR not found in some neighboring communities and village territories? Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2    Land Management, Market Access  Frank Place  Antoine Kalinganire 
1665 Logistic Support to GFRAS for the GFRAS Annual meeting, the International Conference (Innovations in Extension and Advisory Services) and the GFRAS Steering Committee Meeting, in Nairobi, November 2011 World Agroforestry Centre  2011-06-21  2012-01-30  In this project,  ICRAF will provide GFRAS with logistic and administrative support to organise GFRAS' Annual meeting (to be held in Nairobi). Support will include: handling registrations, writing official invitation letters to participants, arranging venue, (technical) infrastructure, food (coffee breaks, lunch), preparing meeting folders, organizing intepretation from and to Spanish and French, recording the meeting (writing minutes, organising a group photo, printing a meeting CD-ROM, inviting the press), elaborating promotional materia, organising a cocktail for participants and other duties as may be required. Additionally and in relation to the conference titled "Linking knowledge to Policy and Action for Food and Livelihoods", ICRAF will organise a field trip (as member of the Local Planning Committee), producing promotional material, arranging interpretation from and to Spanish, organising a GFRAS cocktail for participants and other duties as may be required. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-3    Policy & Institutions  Steve Franzel   
1667 IFAR Fellowship 2011 World Agroforestry Centre  2011-01-01  2011-12-31  The purpose of this grant is to foster scientific excellence and build capacity in agriculture and related fields by carrying out the following projects: Project 1. Improving clonal propagation of Detarium microcarpum Guill & Perr from root cuttings (Burkina Faso) Aim of the project: The present project aims at improving the technique of root cuttings for Detarium microcarpum by enhancing sprouting efficiency and new root formation of root segments from mature and juvenile plants. The specific objectives are: 1. To examine the effect of season on the sprouting ability of root segments from mature trees, 2. To determine the effects of fertilizers on root development of seedlings and their sprouting ability, and 3. To determine the effects of plant growth regulators; cytokinin on sprouting and new root formation from root segments from juvenile plants and auxin on the rooting ability of new sprouts in four experiments. Project  2. Impacts of organic and conservation farming practices on soil fauna and weed dynamics in Chongwe District, Zambia Goal: To contribute to the understanding of soil macrofauna and weed dynamics in organic and conservation farming systems in Zambia Objective are as follows: 1 : Evaluate the effect of organic and conservation farming practices on the soil macrofauna 2: Determine the effect of green fertilizer cover crops on weed infestation Burkina Faso, Zambia  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2    Agrobiodiversity, Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems  Sileshi Weldesamayat  Jules Balaya 
1668 Support for Applied Research on the Feasibility of Sustainable Bio fuels Production, for Oil Palm in West Kalimantan World Agroforestry Centre  2011-08-01  2013-08-30  The goal of this project is to meet sustainability criteria in land-use planning, specifically, to balance social needs and palm oil production for stakeholders (business, government and communities) in Sanggau and Sekadau districts in West Kalimantan. Objectives are as follows: 1.Scientific evidence is provided to stakeholders to assist with negotiations, reduce conflict and assist with compliance with Indonesia’s legal and sustainability criteria and international biofuel sustainability initiatives (EU Renewable Energy Sources Directive, US Energy Directive, Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation, Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels and Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil). 2.Existing information is analysed to identify land allocations to oil palm plantations at the expense of local communities’ agriculture and agroforestry, specifically, information from the local taskforce on land conflict at district level (TP4K Sanggau) and the participatory spatial planning units of each district. 3. Ways are identified of incorporating community mapping into participatory spatial zoning to ensure that local communities’ histories and agency in mapping are respected and their participation in planning decision-making is enhanced. 4. A manual is published on how to incorporate community mapping into participatory spatial planning. 5. Local stakeholders in Sekadau district are supported to adopt the lessons from Sanggau district. Indonesia  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Crops, Land Management, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems  Ujjwal Pradhan   
1669 Implementing the Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture project activities in Kenya and Nairobi World Agroforestry Centre  2011-08-15  2012-09-30  In this project, ICRAF will undertake the following activities: 1. Collect and review soco-economic and biophysical data from existing projects; work with farmers to identify barriers and incentives to adoption and develop a menu of suitable climate-smart practices. 2. Develop capacity of farmers, farmer groups and development and extension practitioners for increased crop-livestock-tree productivity using climate smart practices through training and demonstration sites. 3. Measure baseline ecosystem characteristics and monitor changes using the Land Health Surveillance Framework and employ Greenhouse Gas flux measurements. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-4, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Livestock, Policy & Institutions  Steve Franzel   
1670 Scale-up of Soybean Production in Rwanda to Improve Soil Fertility and Livelihood for Farmers World Agroforestry Centre  2011-05-01  2013-05-31  The goal of this project os to scale up soybean production in Rwanda to improve soil fertility and livelihood to farmers. The following activities will be undertaken: 1. Mobilise farmers to establish Agroforestry tree nurseries for supplying high quality seedlings to increase the number of trees on farms in order to meet challenges such as soil fertility, erosion control, adaptaion to climate change and others. 2. Gradually increase the number of trees on farms beginning 2011 to achieve 650,000 fertilizers trees in year 1 and 650,000 fertilizer trees by the end of year 2. 3. Train farmers on best practices for high quality seedling production, agroforestry tree planting, management and use of green manure from fertilizer trees to improve soil fertility. Rwanda  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Forestry & Agroforestry, Seed Systems, Soils  Jeremias Mowo   
1672 Project 1 – In Mali SubRegional Workshop “Pratiques de Formulation et d’utilisation des Conventions Locales au Sahel” Project 2 – In Cameroon “Strengthening MP’s Position for Policy Change on Land and Forest Community Rights in Cameroon” Project 3 World Agroforestry Centre  2011-03-15  2011-10-15  The objective of project 1 is to create an appropriate space to share with other Sahelian countries the tools elaborated and validated in Mali during 2010 for developing and using local conventions in natural resource management. The workshop will also serve as a platform for advocacy with government to recognize local conventions and as an opportunity for wide dissemination of the methodological guide elaborated in 2010. The objective of project 2 is to enhance MPs and other stakeholders' dialogue through meetings at local and national levels and o capitalize on their understanding of the importance of community rights through a white paper on land and forest tenure advocating for land and forest tenure's inclusion in the upcoming forestry and land laws. The objective of project 3 is to advocate for the active involvement of the Cameroon coalition members in Cameroon's REDD-RPP to ensure that issues of tenure and rights are mainstreamed into REDD and climate change mechanisms while empowering local stakeholders via meetings on REDD concepts and processes to benefit the poor. Cameroon, Mali  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Agrobiodiversity, Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions  Antoine Kalinganire  Serge Ngendakumana 
1674 To Review Agroforestry Research at Corpoica, within its National Context and Identify Priorities for Future Research Together. World Agroforestry Centre  2011-09-01  2012-01-31  The aim of this project is to review agroforestry research at Corpoica, within its national context, and identify priorities for future research. The review will cover all five natural regions of Colombia and, while focusing on research with trees that Corpoica has done, is doing and plans to do, will place this within a national context, including consideration of key expertise and ongoing research by other organizations. The subject focus will include all Corpoica research with trees - from non-timber forest products, timber tree and perennial tree crop plantations through to trees on pastures and in agricultural fields and landscapes for productive and environmentally protective purposes. Colombia  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions  Fergus Sinclair  Adrian Radcliffe 
1675 Provide ACCI with Scenario of Climate Change & Variability & its Potential Effects on the Main Farming Activities World Agroforestry Centre  2011-08-22  2011-10-31  In this project, ICRAF will provide ACCI with scenario of climate change and variability and its potential effects on the main farming activities in Kenya. Among other activities, ICRAF will: 1. Describe and assess past climate change modelling initiatives for Kenya and their relevance, if any for the project site. 2. Screen climate data sources available for the pilot sites as well as available agriculture information and access relevant data. 3. Compare suitable climate change models and select relevant ones for the modelling and down scaling. 4. Undertake climate- crop model coupling to synchronize agronomic practices with climate variability. 5. Develop weather trigger benchmarks for particular crops/if possible varieties. 6. Carry out analysis 7. Based on the scenarios, develop adaptation options. 8. Communicate the findings from the local climate change model to relevant stakeholder through a workshop. 9. Cover climate change information, models and scenarios relevant to the agricultural sector in Busia and Homabay countries. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Policy & Institutions  Eike Luedeling   
1678 UN-REDD Panama Program World Agroforestry Centre  2011-09-01  2012-04-30  The overall objective of this Agreement is to produce a detailed estimation of the full opportunity costs of a REDD program in Panama for a range of potential scenarios. The analysis will also include an estimation of implementation and transaction costs. The areas of Panama to be included in this analysis tentatively comprise of Darien, Costa Abajo de Colon and Bocas del Toro. Project outputs are as follows: 1. A detailed report including analysis results of historical deforestation and driver identification, future land use change via scenario analysis, carbon in land uses, carbon credit process, opportunity cost of a REDD program and flow of REDD program funds. 2. A full compilation of primary and secondary data used in the analysis 3. A full description of the protocol used in the analysis for independent replication by third parties Panama  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-7    Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management  Peter Minang   
1679 Revisiting Climate Change within Maasai Mau Forest and its Future Implication on Maasai Mau Forest Complex’s Conservation World Agroforestry Centre  2011-09-01  2012-06-30  This project aims to create a favorable environment for policy and forest law implementation and assist the managers of the Maasai Mau Forest, including local communities, make a transition from unsustainable land husbandry practices to sustainable management. This project further seeks to increase the participation of women in the management on Mau Forest Complex through research. As such, ICRAF, through The African Women in Agriculture Research and Development and together with UNEP will seek to provide mentoring, capacity building in science and leadership in development to two outstanding women. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5  United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP)  Climate Change, Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Henry Neufeldt   
1682 Ecosystem Mapping in Kenya World Agroforestry Centre  2011-10-17  2011-12-16  The broad purpose of this task is to gather ecological, social and economic information on selected landscapes of Kenya and project the investment needs to inform USAID/Kenya's multi-year strategy development process in the Environment and Natural Resources sector. Specific objectives are as follows: 1. To conduct integrated mapping of selected landscapes 2. To assess the resource investment required for landscape level natural resource development Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Malesu Maimbo   
1683 Livelihood Diversifying Potential of Livestock Based Carbon Sequestration Options in Pastoral and Agropastoral Systems in Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2011-04-01  2014-03-31  The objectives of this agreement are to: 1. Estimate the carbon sequestering potential of rangelands taking advantage of existing long-term livestock and rangeland management experiments and assess the potential of avoiding carbon emissions by decisions on land-use and livestock management. 2.Explore adaptive livestock management options to sequester and avoid emissions of carbon from rangelands through collaborative research with local livestock keeping communities in Ethiopia and Burkina Faso. 3. Assess the effects of changes in livestock and rangeland management on GHG emissions and land surface albedo. 4. Synthesize the research, combining the impact of livestock and rangeland management practices aimed at sequestration and avoidance of carbon emissions while taking taking into account the combined radiative forcing of GHG emissions and albedo, and assess the potential of PES scenarios to diversify pastoral livelihoods. The aim of these Carbon studies is to collect information on soil and land surface characteristics for experimental sites and larger areas in Ethiopia and Burkina Faso. This work will be done so as to i) Assess the impact of grazing and fire on soil Carbon stocks, and ii) Sample soil Carbon and land surface characteristics to allow production of maps revealing spatial variation on soil Carbon across a larger area. Burkina Faso, Ethiopia  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-4    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Livestock, Policy & Institutions, Soils  Keith Shepherd   
1687 SEAR-NET International Conference, November 13 To 18,2011, Mpumalanga, South Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2011-11-14  2012-05-14  The purpose of this agreement is for ICRAF to manage financial, logistics and administrative matters concerning the attendance of CTA sponsored participants at SearNet International Conference: Scaling up water harvesting, innovation for climate change mitigation and adaptation, November 13th to 18th, in Mpumalanga, South Africa. South Africa  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5    Climate Change, Water Management  Malesu Maimbo   
1690 Enhanced control of CBPP through the development of an inactivated vaccine – proof of concept International Livestock Research Institute  2011-08-01  2012-03-31  Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is among the most important livestock diseases within Africa and affects the livelihood and food supply of many livestock dependent people. CBPP caused by the bacterium Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is present in many countries of sub Saharan Africa and the current control programmes rely on a live vaccine with poor efficacy, short duration of immunity and severe side effects. Over the last few decades Africa has experienced a resurgence of CBPP. A policy of strict movement control and test and slaughter is at this time not possible to implement in most regions because of mobile production systems tailored to highly variable rainfall patterns, fragmented veterinary services and lack of funds for compensation. The aim of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using inactivated mycoplasma for the induction of protective responses against a challenge with CBPP. Therefore we will use a two-step approach. The project team will first establish a robust and reproducible challenge model. Afterwards they will immunize cattle with bacterins from a African Mmm outbreak strain followed by a challenge trial. The immunisations will be carried out using different adjuvants and routes of immunization to compare the rate of the protection achieved. Project goal and purpose A better vaccine to CBPP is the major stepping-stone for a successful eradication policy. Many attempts to improve the current live vaccine or to find protective antigens have failed. The main goal of this proposal is to deliver proof of concept for an inactivated vaccine. If successful, future research will be geared towards improving a practical delivery package and towards acquiring solid scientific data on protective immune responses and to generate knowledge, which can be applied to other mycoplasma infections in the veterinary field. Expected outputs Develop a uniform challenge model for CBPP Confirm induction of protection by inactivated mycoplasma The project is a partnership with BecA and CSIRO Kenya      Livestock  Jan Naessens  Joerg Jores 
1651 Using forests to enhance resilience to climate change project Center for International Forestry Research  2011-05-20  2013-03-31  The objective of the grant is to support certain activities to be carried out under the study on using forests for adaptation to enhance resilience to climate change. The knowledge gained from the Study will be disseminated to the relevant decision makers and development practitioners in order to inform policy and project development processes Burkina Faso, Honduras, Laos  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-02    Climate Change  Aaron Russell   
1654 Enhancing dairy-based livelihoods in India and Tanzania through feed intervention and value chain development approaches (MilkIT) International Livestock Research Institute  2011-10-01  2014-09-30  Small-scale dairy production is an almost universal component of the farming enterprise among smallholders farming in mixed crop-livestock systems in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. The availability of sufficient high-quality feed is a key constraint to improving milk yields and hence dairy income for smallholders through intensification of smallholder dairy systems. This project places feed in a broader context and acknowledges that enhancing feed supply has both technical and institutional dimensions. The project tackles feed scarcity from a value chain perspective and employs innovation system principles. The emphasis on value chain and innovation approaches will necessarily involve consideration of issues beyond feed including enhancing breed quality and health status of dairy cows. The overall goal of the project is to contribute to improved dairy-derived livelihoods in India and Tanzania via intensification of smallholder production focusing on enhancement of feeds and feeding using innovation and value chain approaches. The objectives of the project are three-fold: Institutional strengthening: To strengthen use of value chain and innovation approaches among dairy stakeholders to improve feeding strategies for dairy cows. Productivity enhancement: To develop options for improved feeding strategies leading to yield enhancement with potential income benefits. Knowledge sharing: To strengthen knowledge sharing mechanisms on feed development strategies at local, regional and international levels The project is embedded in the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish. India, Tanzania  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT)  Livestock  Alan Duncan  Amos Omore, Ben Lukuyu, Brigitte Maass, Michael Blummel, Nils Teufel 
1652 Wetlands Global Carbon Survey Center for International Forestry Research  2010-09-30  2012-09-30  This program will begin a global effort to fill a major data gap in REDD+, that of carbon storage, especially below-ground carbon, in peatlands, mangroves, and other wetlands. The USFS and CIFOR have begun this initiative on a small scale in Philippines, Indonesia and Bangladesh. This project will scale up those efforts to a multi-year, hopefully multi-donor, global initiative that will eventually inventory the carbon storage of all the major wetland ecosystems using a standardized approach. USFS and CIFOR will provide technical backstopping and leadership to create a multi-institutional network that carries out the surveys using common methodologies. After a survey of needs and gaps, the program will also support development of emissions factors for different types of human wetland management such as draining, flooding, deforestation, and conversion to agriculture; estimating C02, methane, and other gases. Field implementation will be done with local partners such as universities, NGOs and government research agencies to build local scientific expertise. Bangladesh, Indonesia, Philippines  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-01    Climate Change  Louis Verchot   
1648 Adaptation of people to climate change in East Africa: Ecosystem services, risk reduction and human well-being Center for International Forestry Research  2011-12-01  2015-06-30  To carry out a study that will contribute to the development of national policies and local practices for adaptation to climate change in rural East Africa, that more fully acknowledge the role of forest resources and ecosystem services as a central component of risk reduction, poverty alleviation and human well-being as well as reduction of greenhouse gases. Kenya, Uganda  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-02    Climate Change  Aaron Russell   
1647 Carbon Benefits Project: Modeling, Measuring and Monitoring Center for International Forestry Research  2009-08-28  2012-03-01  The objective of this project is to help the GEF promote and prove carbon as a global environmental benefit in SLM interventions by providing a cost effective, user-friendly, yet scientifically rigorous methodology for measuring carbon and GHG mitigation benefits in GEF projects dealing with natural resources in all climate zones and land use systems. The system will allow users to (i) estimate and model carbon (C) stocks and flows and GHG emissions and (ii) to measure, monitor and manage carbon in GEF and similar projects across an inclusive range of land use systems. Kenya  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-01    Climate Change  Louis Verchot   
1646 A scoping study in the Eastern, Northern and North-western Provinces for understanding dynamics of a charcoal and indigenous timber trade in connection to the integrated forest management Center for International Forestry Research  2011-08-23  2011-09-30  This project seeks to explore new dimensions of the charcoal trade and its social, health and environmental consequences, with a focus on major governance and trade transitions, so as to distil lessons for policy and practice grounded in both theory and solid data. Systematic  comparison of contexts which are strongly shaped by these transitions with those that are not will enable the validation of past research findings while also producing new knowledge on a sector in transition. Findings will be utilized to systematically engage policy makers and practitioners in the design of alternatives for governing the sector – including spatial targeting of public sector, community-led and ‘hybrid’ initiatives on the basis of degradation hotspots. A second phase of the project, if funded, would focus on piloting interventions designed around research findings (e.g. environmental hotspots, institutional design principles) and policy realities (e.g. political and economic viability of alternatives) in an action research mode. In addition to generating “proof of concept”, this experience would aid in crystallizing the contextual factors and actions required for solutions to be effective. Angola, Mozambique, Tanzania  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-04  Common Market for East and Souther Africa (COMESA)  Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Davison Gumbo   
1644 Overcoming constraints to community-based commercial forest in Indonesia Center for International Forestry Research  2011-04-01  2015-09-30  The overall aim of this project is to undertake in-depth analytical research of the three dominant business moels used in CBCF in Indonesia, so to refine existing models and underpin approaches to better inform farmers about their livelihoods investment decisions. This project will also take into account the community context in which CBCF operates, so that the anticipated positive impacts of the CBCF acan be readily identified. Indonesia  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-03    Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Christine Padoch   
1640 Enhancing production and quality of groundnut oil in drought-prone environments through varietal technology to boost the income of small and marginal groundnut farmers in India International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2011-04-01  2016-03-31  The overall goal of the project is to enhance oil productivity of groundnut (oil production per unit area) by promoting cultivation in the rainfed cropping systems of varieties that are high yielding and high in oil content with enhanced O/L ratio. The main aim of the project is to develop groundnut varieties with high yield, high oil content and enhanced O/L ratio to increase oil production in rainfed, drought-prone environments and oil stability (shelf life) of groundnut using both, conventional and molecular tools.  The  project is significant as it aims to boost production of high quality groundnut oil in India, which is a net importer of edible oils. With enhanced oil content and O/L ratio in new groundnut varieties, the proposed project envisages increase in health benefits to consumers and a reduction in the importation of edible oil thus reducing the burden on India’s exchequer. In addition, the high oil recovery from new groundnut varieties will catalyze oil processing industry and as a consequence bring in additional incomes to poor groundnut farmers of the SAT regions in the country. India    Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU), India, Tamilnadu Agricultural University (TNAU),India  Crops  SN Nigam  P Janila, Rajeev Varshney 
1638 Increasing Agricultural Productivity and Incomes through Bridging Yield gaps with Science-led Interventions in Andhra Pradesh International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2011-10-28  2011-10-27  The overall goal of the project is to increase average productivity of target crops in the selected districts by 25% in five years and identify suitable adaptation strategies forcoping with the likely changes associated with climate change. The specific objectives are as follows:- To identify best-bet crop management options (soil, crop and water management) including improved varieties to enhance productivity of the selected crops in targeted seven districts by 25%. To undertake representative soil sampling (stratified sampling method forfarmers in villages in a district) to prepare GIS-based soil maps depicting micro- and macro- nutrient status of the soils. To assess the likely impacts of climate change in the target seven districts and identify suitable adaptation strategies to cope with the climate change To build capacity of the stakeholders (farmers and consortium partners) in sustainable management of natural resources, enhancing crop productivity in dryland areas and adaptation strategies to cope with climate change. India    Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU), India, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture in India, Department of Agriculture, Government of Andhra Pradesh  Climate Change, Crops, Land Management, Soils, Water Management  Suhas Wani  CLL Gowda 
1637 Improving Rural Livelihoods and Minimizing Land Degradation through the Community Watershed Approach for Sustainable Development of Dryland Areas International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2008-03-01  2013-02-28  The project is aimed at  improving the livelihoods of rural people in the target agro-ecoregion through sustainable management of natural resources by adopting the science-led, holistic, community watershed management approach. The specific objectives of this project are:  To consolidate the science-led farmer-centric community watershed approach at nucleus benchmark watersheds for enhancing productivity and reducing land degradation in three districts, and to use these sites as sites of learning for scaling-out benefits in the three target districts; To scale-out the benefits of productivity enhancement and community watershed management with technical backstopping in the target agro-ecoregion of M.P. (10+2 districts) and Rajasthan (9+1 districts); and Capacity building of lead farmers, development workers, and consortium partners in the target region and provide technical support to development agencies in the area of Community Watersheds through establishment of a national support group for community watershed development (NSGCWD). India    BAIF Development Research Foundation, Bhopal Yuwa Paryavaran Shikshan & Samajik Sansthan (BYPASS), India, Central Arid Zone Research Institute (CAZRI), Jodhpur, India, Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture in India, Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya(JNKVV), India, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology (MPUA&T), Udaipur, India, Samaj Pragati Sahayog, India, World Vegetable Centre (AVRDC)  Crops, Land Management, Livestock, Soils, Water Management  Suhas Wani   
1630 G5: Coordination and Change Enabling WorldFish Center  2011-05-01  2014-03-31  Project G5 is the “Coordination and Change-Enabling” project for the Ganges Basin Development Challenge. The Project G5 objective is “To enhance impacts in Bangladesh and India through stakeholder participation, policy dialogue and effective coordination among other Government, NGO’s, Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) and donors sponsored projects and programs in the Ganges Basin Develpment Challange (BDC)  research Program” There are two major, inter-related activities: (i) coordination with our partners in Project G1-G4; and (ii) enabling change. Project G5 is responsible for maintaining the coherence, integration and focus with our partners leading Projects G1 to G4, through active leadership and ensuring effective communication among projects. Building upon the Ganges BDC impact pathways, Project G5 will lead and coordinate monitoring and evaluation of project progress and integration, with close attention to the quality of implementation, and research products emerging from individual projects. Project G5 will utilize tools of Results Based Management (RBM) to ensure that Projects 1-4 are well integrated into a program of research that ultimately delivers change – development outcomes and impacts. RBM is an approach to adaptive management that strongly emphasizes participation and learning. Learning depends on good information and feedback that will be derived from and delivered by an effective Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) system. G5 connects the research under each project across topics and scales, from household agriculture-aquaculture farming systems to community polder water management through to broader land use planning. The project is also an interface between the program and a variety of existing and potential stakeholders and works towards scaling out of research results to multiple stakeholders with common interest in achieving the BDC. Project G5 outputs are knowledge sharing products such as: (i) policy briefs and other interventions tailored for policy makers; (ii) capacity building tools; (iii) demonstrated approaches for scaling out; (iv) scenarios for climate and hydrological change; and (v) outputs from innovation research. These will be achieved in various ways through activities involving coordination, identifying and enabling partnerships for change; innovation research; development and implementation of a communications strategy; operation of an adaptive management system; support to capacity building; and more generally serving in a leadership and team building role for the Ganges BDC. Impacts will include reduced poverty, improved food security and strengthened livelihood resilience for people in coastal Bangladesh and India. Bangladesh, India    BRAC (Bangladesh)  Policy & Institutions, Water Management  William Collis  William Collis 
1629 G3: Water Governance and Community-based Management International Water Management Institute  2011-04-01  2014-04-25  Inundation and severe flooding in the coastal areas is a frequent occurrence in Bangladesh. This leads to loss of life and property as well as severe impacts on livelihoods. The government of Bangladesh has been investing steadily in coastal zone management through construction and rehabilitation of polders. This project is about water governance and community based management of polders in coastal zones in Bangladesh. The challenges facing the polder communities are complex and similar to those faced by many communities in which water is used for multiple purposes. But unlike other multiple use systems (such as canals, tanks), where there is rarely ever a commonality in interest, in case of polder communities, the fear that these polders may breach during a natural calamity and cause damage to life and property makes it easier to bring about a modicum of community action. However, beyond this commonality, the communities face conflicting interest. They must prioritize water use across different sectors (water for irrigation vs. water for shrimp cultivation, pond fisheries) or within the same sector (irrigation for boro crop vs. irrigation for upland crops) and also cope with prolonged periods of submergence and non-rainy days. They must also limit potential conflict between water users, as they endeavor to use water efficiently, without seriously compromising equity issues, such as those related to access to water by marginalized members of the community and women. The main objective of this research project is to understand the different modes and outcomes of water governance in selected polder sites and understand the role that communities play in such governance, conflict resolution and productive use of land and water resources. Given the complexity of issues, we will adopt a three phase research approach. In Phase I, we will conduct situation analysis in six selected polders. This will enable us to understand the different uses of water in polders, the conflicting interests arising thereof and the different governance mechanisms that are in place to manage these conflicts and their comparative advantage and disadvantages. In Phase II, we will zoom into community governance issues of two polders and do a detailed study on pros and cons of community management of polders. Phase III will run concurrently with Phase I and Phase II and we will do training and capacity activities in this phase. The main output of the project will be generation of knowledge aimed at sustaining high levels of polder governance through community participation. Bangladesh, India      Water Management  Aditi Mukherji   
1628 G2: Productive, profitable, and resilient agriculture and aquaculture systems International Rice Research Institute  2011-04-30  2014-04-30  The brackish-water coastal zone of the Ganges is home to some of the world’s poorest, most food insecure, and most vulnerable people.  The Research for Development Program of the Ganges Basin Development Challenges (BDC) is set up with a goal toreduce poverty, improve food security, and strengthen livelihood resilience in coastal areas through improved water governance and management, and more productive and diversified farm systems. Project G2 will contribute to this goal through developing and introducing more productive, diversified, and resilient agriculture/aquaculture production systems in the fresh-/brackish-water coastal zones of the Ganges delta in Bangladesh and India. The project has five specific objectives, and each will produce an output contributing to the above overall objectives: validate new germplasm suitable for various agricultural cropping systems and establish seed distribution networks in target zones; develop and disseminate more productive, profitable, resilient, and diversified rice-based cropping systems (including rice-aquaculture); enhance the productivity of homestead production systems; develop novel brackish-water aquatic production systems for zones too saline for agricultural crops; and produce technology and policy recommendations for up- and out-scaling. The project maintains strong linkages with other projects in the Ganges BDC, builds on the success of the Phase 1Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) projects in the Ganges, notably PN 10 and PN 7, and will leverage the ongoing work of other projects in the coastal zones of Bangladesh and India, especially Stress Tolerant Rice for Africa and South Asia (STRASA), USAID-Cereals Systems Initiative for South Asia (USAID-CSISA), and Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC)’s agricultural program. It will use two complementary approaches: farmer participatory validation/demonstration of promising crops, cropping patterns, homestead farming, and aquacultural technologies; and in-depth process analysis of new crop/aquaculture systems—using on-station experiments and simulation modeling. The expected outcomes of the project include decision-makers/policymakers endorse the use of modern varieties, technologies, and homestead and cropping systems and provide policies/support that enable widespread adaptation of research findings; seed producers will produce adequate validated varieties for farmers; and large-scale adaptation of the more productive, profitable, and stable cropping systems in fields and in homesteads. Bangladesh, India    BRAC (Bangladesh)  Aquaculture  To Phuc Tuong   
1627 G1: Resource profiles, extrapolation domains, and land-use patterns International Rice Research Institute  2011-04-30  2014-04-30  The Ganges Basin Development Challenge (BDC) research program will focus on brackish-water coastal zones in the Ganges Basin, where agricultural lands have a maximum salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand(ppt)  in the dry season (salinity is lower in the wet season). The BDC vision of success requires innovations in water governance, improved availability of dry-season water, improved practices for managing salt-affected lands, and intensification and diversification of farm systems. In short, the program requires technological innovation and effective dissemination of those technologies. Before a technology can be disseminated beyond the study site where it is developed, it is important to identify its “extrapolation domain.” This requires matching the resource profile of an area with the resource requirements of a technology. The goals of these technologies—increased resilience, improved livelihoods, increased production—also require an understanding of how can the land in the coastal zones best be zoned and used to meet different goals and objectives? And, how should land use change for anticipated hydrological change scenarios? This project aims to answer the question of “what works where” now and under climate change scenarios. The G1 project has four activities, each with one output. Compilation of a geodatabase covering all spatial information related to the project. Characterization of the test sites and study areas from projects G2 and G3. Mapping extrapolation domains for each technology from G2. Development of future land-use plans based on historical land-use trends, assumed changes, constraints, and interventions from future scenarios. The likely impacts of G1 are Better targeting information for local government and extension services, which in turn leads to a higher likelihood of adoption of new crop intensification and water governance strategies. Better decision making at the local government level due to improved awareness of land-use options. Bangladesh, India      Land Management  Andrew Nelson   
1625 L3: Farm Systems and Risk Management International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-08-01  2013-11-30  Mixed crop-livestock farming is the predominant system of production in the Limpopo Basin, but livestock production constitutes the main income source in these systems. It offers the most established form of market engagement by small holders and is the more resilient production system under highly variable rainfall. However, crop production for food is widely pursued by smallholder famers under these dry conditions, even in regions receiving as little as 350mm of rain. This raises the question: would small-scale farmers achieve higher levels of food security, income and water productivity by devoting resources to fodder production in the dry conditions of the Limpopo Basin, especially as fodder is a more resilient production system than grain? Further, from a systems perspective—what farm management practices can be employed by farmers based on their particular skill and resource levels in a specific environment? L3 will define the interplay between market access, crop and livestock technologies, and investment risks in water- and market-scarce environments that lead to technology adoption by farm families, enabling them to enhance food security and incomes through more efficient water use. Innovation Platforms: The main entry point for the project will be the Innovation Platform (IP), which brings together value chain actors: input suppliers, farmers, traders, processors, etc in a shared forum to explore their challenges and opportunities. From this, the IP proposes site-specific solutions to align production and market requirements around food and cash crop production, dry season feed, animal health, and poor market performance. Crop and Livestock Modelling: Participatory modelling will be an entry point to develop scenarios based on local knowledge, to be tested with farmers using on-farm participatory trials. Model testing and calibration will be done using on-farm trials then the model will be used to develop scenarios and extrapolate management effects to other soil types and rainfall regimes across time. Technology interventions linked to market development: This project targets private sector, NGO and CBO agents to bring about market-related changes for smallholder farmers. Such initiatives may include contract farming for groundnut production and a voucherbased input (seed and fertilizer) distribution scheme for smallholder farmers. South Africa, Zimbabwe    Agricultural Research Council (ARC), South Africa, AGRITEX  Crops, Livestock  John Dimes  Isaac Minde, John Dimes, Brilliant Petja 
1621 V4: Sub-basin management and governance of rainwater and small reservoirs International Water Management Institute  2011-10-01  2012-12-31  A strong international consensus has been created regarding the need for Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and what it means. The river basin is singled out as the natural unit for organizing water management but implementation is invariably said to be faulty. Calls for more reforms follow, but they rarely question policy models themselves: they face the same shortcomings they were meant to address. This project aims at understanding the processes that govern IWRM policy-making, practice and research in the Volta Basin. This will be done to identify demand-driven opportunities for the management and the governance of rainwater and small reservoirs at the watershed (sub-basin) level. The project will make use of tools and results of previous Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) projects, such as the Small Reservoirs Project, and other works, to develop and test participatory approaches to watershed (sub-basins) management in the Volta river basin. A modeling platform will bring together expert knowledge on the biophysical aspects of watersheds and local understanding of natural resources dynamics. This will serve as the basis for initiating a participatory process at the watershed level in which multiple stakeholders such as local farmers and decision makers, researchers, and national policy makers will engage. Participatory modeling and role playing game will be used to identify desirable rainwater and small reservoirs governance options. This research is based on the hypothesis that participatory approaches are useful to link local knowledge and perceptions of natural resources systems -that translate into transformation pathways- to expert/scientific knowledge and policy-makers imperatives. Participatory approaches will be combined with a critical assessment of the theory and practice of natural resources policy making and research activities –including this project. We will draw from the fields of Political Ecology and Science and Technology Studies to better understand local dynamics and appropriation pathways of innovations such as IWRM policy interventions. By going beyond the simplistic –yet commonly admitted- divide between formal decision making and informal practices, this research project will lead to enhance impacts of on-going policy initiatives in the Volta basin. Burkina Faso, Ghana    Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), Wheat Research Centre (Bangladesh)  Water Management  Jean-Philippe Venot  Aaron Aduna, Christophe Le Page, Deborah Bossio, Patrick d’Aquino, Eline Boelee, Katherine Snyder, Mark Giordano, Moses Kwadwo Kambou, Pierre Zoungrana 
1619 V2: Integrated management of rainwater for crop-livestock agroecosystems International Livestock Research Institute  2010-10-01  2013-12-31  With mixed crop-livestock systems projected to remain the main providers of food (animal and plant) in the coming decades, opportunities exist for smallholders to participate and benefit from emerging crop and livestock markets in the Volta Basin. Given the economic, social and environmental vulnerability due to high water scarcity and variability in the basin, improvements in rainwater management are needed for ensuring sustainable and equitable benefits. This project therefore intends to identify, evaluate, adapt, and disseminate best-fit integrated rainwater management strategies (RMS), targeted to different biophysical and socio-economic domains. The integrated RMS are comprised of technological solutions, directed at different components of the agroecosystems, underpinned by enabling institutional and policy environments and linked to market incentives that can drive adoption. The aim is to increase crop and livestock productivity to result in enhanced livelihoods and positive environmental impacts, through strengthened institutional capacity and improved equitable and gender-sensitive performance of crop and livestock value chains. Building on existing knowledge and based on participatory diagnosis of constraints, opportunities and criteria for success, integrated RMS will be inventoried and prioritized. Through interdisciplinary action research, the effects of selected promising RMS and the enabling environments for them to succeed, will be assessed. Innovation platforms, comprising key actors along the value chain, will be the major mechanism to facilitate the action research and participatory monitoring and learning. Tools and frameworks for integrated analysis of RMS, farming systems, gendered livelihoods and value chains will be developed, tested and adapted. Synthesis of the findings will inform the development of guidelines for integrated and targeted RMS options in specific recommendation domains. Learning alliances around rainwater management involving influential actors at various levels will be formed to facilitate joint learning and experience sharing, in order to support scaling out and up. A wide range of information and communication tools will be used to disseminate the project findings to different stakeholders and to obtain their feedback. Through improved collaboration amongst actors along the value chain, their capacity to access and use relevant knowledge on integrated rainwater management will be enhanced, which will allow them to respond to emerging challenges and opportunities in the context of evolving crop-livestock systems. Burkina Faso, Ghana    CRS, INERA  Crops, Livestock  Augustine Ayantunde  Bruno Gerard, Diego Valbuena, Rainer Asse, Ranjitha Puskur 
1617 Adaptation by agricultural communities to climate change through participatory and supply chain-inclusive management Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-06-01  2011-05-30  Outcomes of this project were to: Develop a framework with concrete response pathways for collective, supply chain inclusive adaptation to progressive climate change.  Produce a set of methodologies and tools that will enable Oxfam and partners to scale-out the approach across projects globally.  Determine specific results for three different supply chains. Donor: Oxfam Great Britain Colombia, Guatemala, Jamaica      Climate Change, Market Access  Peter Laderach  Anton Eitzinger 
1613 Mk2: Water valuation WorldFish Center  2010-06-01  2013-08-31  This project is about assessing the value of water in its various uses. It sets out to estimate the costs and benefits of different uses of  Water Storage Infrastructure (WSI) water at reservoir and catchment levels. It includes an assessment of water needs for major water uses (agriculture, fisheries, ecosystem, and⁄ or hydropower) and features the application of quantitative and qualitative valuation techniques to estimate costs and benefits associated with different water management strategies and scenarios. Water valuation means expressing the value of water-related goods and services so as to inform sharing and allocation decisions. It covers both use and non-use values, extractive and in situ use values, and consumptive and non-consumptive use values. It features quantitative and qualitative approaches and considers relationships between interconnected and interdependent water uses. Project outputs will take the form of valuation estimates that reflect the distribution of costs and benefits: across uses and users (considering gender differentiation), across scales (in the reservoir and across the catchment area considering other WSI). Valuation is seen as essential to well-informed water resource management. Valuation will support a structured mechanism of multi-stakeholder dialogues, helping stakeholders to express their values and perceptions on the use and management of water resources. Assessing and communicating these values is the basis on which stakeholders will seek well-informed decisions in multi-stakeholder platforms. Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)  Ecosystem Management, Fisheries  Yumiko Kura  Benoit Laplante, Jeremy Carew-Reid, Peter-John Meynell 
1611 Mk1: Optimizing reservoir management for livelihoods International Water Management Institute  2010-04-01  2013-12-31  This project is about livelihoods, and how they can be improved through reservoir management for multiple uses and users. It is about developing strategies for optimizing the benefits of  Water Storage Infrastructure (WSI) and increasing the ways in which water can be utilized for the benefit of the poor. Strategies can be developed for individual reservoirs or for cascades or systems of reservoirs. This project will explore ways in which riparian communities can improve their livelihoods by taking advantage of agricultural, fisheries and other opportunities afforded by WSI development. Suitable strategies will broaden the uses of reservoir water to support livelihoods, benefit riparian and downstream communities alike, increase the lifespan of reservoirs, and maintain hydropower generating capacity. Research will also seek to minimize negative down-stream impacts. Research on water use and livelihoods will take account of different needs (agriculture, fisheries, hydropower, and the environment – for example, wetlands preservation) for different user groups (including gender differentiation). These needs can be direct or indirect (for example, health related issues), or for consumptive or non-consumptive use of water (for example, fisheries). In addition, water requirements may vary seasonally, annually or in the long-term (e.g. under the effects of global drivers such as climate change). Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam    WorldFish Center  Water Management  Sonali Senaratna  Chu Thai Hoanh, Suhardiman Diana, Eric Baran, Matthew McCartney, Samonn Mith, Sanjiv de Silva 
1610 AN2: Assessing and anticipating the consequences of introducing benefit sharing mechanisms Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-01-01  2013-11-30  The benefits provided by hydrological ecosystem services (HES) have been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Many attempts have been made to explicitly include this recognition in markets, using schemes known as payments for HES (PHES). Most of the earliest PHES initiatives were in Latin America. Hence, the region boasts the most evolved body of experience to draw from and continues to see the evolution of different forms of PHES. A recent  consideration is the equity of Ecosystem Services's(ES) benefits distribution within the watershed between providers and beneficiaries. In cases where this is highly uneven, broader ‘benefits sharing mechanisms’ (BSMs) –than  “pure” PES schemes, could be more useful measures for avoiding water-related conflicts while maintaining HES provision. In this sense, this project is about showing whether ecosystem services-oriented Benefit Sharing Mechanism (BSM) in watersheds can be effective and equitable. It seeks to quantify the consequences of BSM-driven changes in land and water management for livelihoods in upstream rural communities and for water supplies for downstream water consumers, and in equity conditions. It will develop methods to anticipate ex ante the likely consequences of introducing BSM, to inform the design of such BSM schemes regarding the magnitude, relative value of HES, required institutional and legal frameworks and the willingness of actors to contribute to such mechanisms, as well as monitoring and measuring these consequences ex post. Finally, it will introduce methods for adaptive management in BSM design and planning, so that new instances of BSM can benefit from lessons already learned – for example, so that BSM design is more likely to result in benefits to the upstream rural poor, and to the environment, as well as for downstream water consumers. Colombia, Ecuador, Peru      Water Management  Marcela Quintero   
1545 Integrated management of rainwater to improve smallholder productivity and livelihoods and reduce risk International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-08-01  2013-11-30  This project seeks to define the interplay between market access, crop and livestock technologies, and investment risks in water- and market-scarce environments that leads to technology adoption by farm families, enabling them to enhance food security and incomes through more efficient water use. Three main work areas will contribute to this objective. 1.Water efficient farm enterprises and climate risk management 2.Investment choices matched to farmer capacities and climatic risk environment 3. Market-led technologies for smallholder farmers developed and tested Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe    Agricultural Research Council (ARC), South Africa, AGRITEX, World Vision  Climate Change, Crops, Livestock, Market Access  Andre Van Rooyen   
1568 BREAD: Overcoming the Domestication Bottleneck for Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Legumes International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-04-01  2013-03-31   The basic research goal of the proposed work is to identify plant genotypes and ultimately the underlying genes that regulate the efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation under field conditions, and to determine the extent to which domestication and intensive breeding have reduced nitrogen fixation efficiency. The outcome of these studies will contribute an important new dimension to current worldwide efforts to deduce the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic development and function. At the same time, understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate nitrogen fixation efficiency is of direct relevance to crop improvement efforts in the developing world, where legumes with improved nitrogen fixation efficiency would have a large and direct impact on resource poor farmers. The objectives of this research are to:  1. To elucidate the molecular genetic basis of phenotypic variation for symbiotic nitrogen fixation efficiency in Cicer spp, including C. ariteinum (cultivated chickpea) and C. reticulatum (the wild progenitor). 2. To quantify the impact of domestication on symbiotic nitrogen fixation in chickpea. 3. To initiate purpose-driven populations and association genetics to examine genetic potential for efficient nitrogen fixation in elite genotypes of chickpea.   India, United States of America    Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), India, Rajmata Vijayaraje Scindia Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya (RVSKVV), India, University of California-Davis  Crops  Rajeev Varshney   
1571 Improving the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in drought-prone areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia through enhanced grain legume production and productivity International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2011-09-01  2014-09-30  The overall goal of the TL II project is to enhance productivity by at least 20% for six legume crops covered by this project (chickpea, common bean, cowpea, groundnut, pigeonpea and soybean) in drought-prone areas of SSA and SA, principally through the availability and adoption of improved crop varieties and associated crop management practices. A partnership involving three CGIAR centers, the scientists of 14 national programs, advanced research institutes, the private sector and other R&D organizations will provide the necessary scientific inputs to achieve the goal. The project is organized into nine objectives; six of them crop-specific (Objectives 2 to 7), two  common across the crops(Objectives 1 and 8), and one  on management(Objective 9).  Objective 1: To enhance market opportunities, policies and partnerships along the legume value chain to increase income and nutritional security of smallholder farmers in drought-prone areas of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and SA.  Objective 2: To enhance groundnut productivity and production in drought-prone areas of SSA and SA.  Objective 3: To enhance cowpea productivity and production in drought-prone areas of SSA.  Objective 4: To enhance common bean productivity and production in drought-prone areas of SSA.  Objective 5: To enhance chickpea productivity and production in drought-prone areas of SSA and SA.  Objective 6: To enhance pigeonpea productivity and production in drought-prone areas of SSA and SA.  Objective 7: To enhance soybean productivity and production in drought-prone areas of SSA.  Objective 8: To develop sustainable seed production and delivery systems for reaching smallholder farmers in drought-prone areas of SSA and SA. Objective 9: To manage implementation of the project, including periodic meetings, reporting, data management and dissemination, and developing a revised logframe and milestones based on the Foundations’ Strategy. Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe    Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU), India, Agricultural Research Services (DARS),Malawi, Association des Organisations Professionnelles Paysannes (AOPP), Mali, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI), Bihar Agricultural University, Centre for Agricultural Research and Development (CARD), Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), Department of Research and Development (DRD) - Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security - Tanzania, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Institut d’Economie Rural (IER)- Mali, Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Burkina Faso, Institut de Recherches Agronomiques du Niger (INRAN), Niger, Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), National Semi Arid Resources Research Institute (NaSARRI),Uganda, Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology (OUAT), Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Tamilnadu Agricultural University (TNAU),India, University of Agricultural Science, Bangalore, India, University of Agricultural sciences ,Dharwad (UAS-D),India, University of Agricultural Sciences, Raichur  Crops, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems  CLL Gowda  Tsedeke Abate 
1602 Rehabilitation of degraded lands through silvopastoral systems and reforestation in the savannas of Cordoba, Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2005-12-06  2012-03-06  In 2005, CIAT helped initiate a Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project to recuperate degraded tropical savannas of northern Colombia. The project aimed to enhance productivity and natural resources of 2,600 hectares of land by supporting the establishment of silvopastoral systems and reforested areas. Benefits are many. Landowners increased their income with these profitable land uses, while CVS recovered their initial investment in helping to establish the land use systems. The payments for environmental services enabled these benefits. The BioCarbon Fund of the World Bank acted as a broker for the certified Carbon Emission Reductions (CERs). More farmers can benefit from expanded environmental conservation efforts. Since 2006, the project has met numerous stringent requirements of the CERs negotiation and certification process. This was the first reforestation project negotiated in Colombia with the BioCarbon Fund.   Donor: The World Bank through Corporación Autónoma Regional de los Valles del Sinú y del San Jorge (CVS) Colombia      Land Management  Marcela Quintero   
1600 Evaluation of investment and finance flows for actions of mitigation and adaptation in the agricultural sector Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-11-24  2011-04-24  This project proposes the delivery of four specific activities: (i)       Diagnosis of the current and future agricultural sector. (ii)     Identification of adaptation and mitigation measures for the agricultural sector. (iii)    Evaluation of investment and finance flows. (iv)    Synthesis of previous activities and establishment of the necessary agenda for facilitating the implementation of the proposed measures. __________________________________ Spanish Version: Evaluación de Flujos de Inversion y Financiamiento para Acciones de Mitigacion y Adaptacion en el Sector Agropecuario Específicamente, proponemos 4 actividades dentro de las cuales tratamos todos los temas requeridos en los términos de referencia: Actividad 1: Diagnóstico del sector actual y futuro. Actividad 2: Identificación de medidas de adaptación y mitigación para el sector agropecuario. Actividad 3: Evaluación de flujos de inversión y financiamiento. Actividad 4: Síntesis de actividades anteriores y establecimiento de agenda requerida para facilitar la implementación de las medidas propuestas.   Donor: Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD) Colombia      Policy & Institutions  Jeimar A. Tapasco A.   
1594 Towards a geographic information system of banana farms in Urabá for production monitoring, control, and optimization Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-10-01  2010-05-31  Objectives of this project include: Create a map of agroecological zones using climate data and soil analysis results from the Agustin Codazzi Geographic Institute (IGAC) of Colombia. Perform an exploratory assisted selection analysis of varieties by agroecological zone. Determine the phreatic level throughout the zone in order to establish improved criteria for the design of drainage systems. Conduct exploratory prognostic analyses of Black Sigatoka attacks and its effects on production. ___________________ Spanish Version: Hacia un sistema de información geográfica de fincas bananeras en Urabá para monitoreo, control y optimización de la producción. Crear un mapa de zonas agroecológicas usando datos climáticos y resultados de análisis de suelos del IGAC. Realizar un análisis exploratorio de selección asistida de variedades por zona agroecológica. Determinar el nivel freático a traves de la zona para establecimiento de mejor criterio para diseño de sistemas de drenaje. Análisis exploratorio de pronóstico de ataque de Sigatoka Negra y sus posibles efectos en la producción.   Partner: Instituto Geográfico Agustín Codazzi (IGAC) Donor: Unión de Bananeros de Urabá - UNIBAN Colombia      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Land Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1591 Climate Change and Forests in the Congo Basin Center for International Forestry Research  2010-05-22  2015-05-21  The aim of the project is to develop adaptation strategies at local, national and regional scales that will reduce the vulnerability of forest ecosystem goods and services, forest communities, and forest-dependent sectors to climate change in the Congo Basin Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo Dem. Rep.  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-02    Climate Change, Policy & Institutions  Anne Marie Tiani  Bruno Locatelli, Denis Sonwa 
1589 Watersheds of Medellín, Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-04-20  2010-11-15  The purpose of this project is to identify priority zones for the conservation of various reservoirs in the watershed in the department of Antioquia, Colombia, including La Fe, Rio Grande II and Piedras Blancas, in accordance with the following criteria: water quality, water yield, the retention of sediment. ------------------------------------------ Spanish Version: Cuencas de Medellin Identificar zonas prioritarias para la conservacion en las cuencas de los embalses La Fe, Rio Grande II y Piedras Blancas en el departamento de Antioquia de acuerdo a criterios de calidad de agua, rendimiento de agua y retencion de sedimentos.   Donor: The Nature Conservancy Colombia      Water Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1588 Analysis of climate change vulnerability of four watersheds of the Water for Life Fund Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-06-23  2011-01-30  The purpose of this project is to develop an analysis of vulnerability to climate change scenarios involving four watersheds involved in the Water for Life Fund, to serve as input to develop adaptation strategies to climate change for nine water catchments in the department of Valle del Cauca, Colombia. These include Tulua-Morales, Nima, Amaime, Bolo, Desbaratado, Frayle, Guabas, Palo and Zabaletas. -------------------------------------- Spanish Version: Desarrollar un análisis de vulnerabilidad frente a escenarios de cambio climático de cuatro cuencas involucradas en el fondo agua por la Vida, que sirva como insumo para desarrollar estrategias de adaptación de cambio climático para las 9 cuencas de influencia de Agua por la Vida: Tuluá-Morales, Nima, Amaime, Bolo, Desbaratado,Frayle, Guabas, Palo y Zabaletas.   Donor: The Nature Conservancy Colombia      Climate Change, Water Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1586 Providing means for a better understanding of biodiversity: Improving primary data and using it for threat assessment and in situ conservation planning in South America – Building IABIN Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-10-11  2011-04-15  Objectives of this project were: To finalize and implement a Java-based algorithm to cross-check coordinates of IABIN's terrestrial biodiversity data. To finalize and implement Java-based algorithm to add value to non-georeferenced records within the IABIN network. To assess all the primary data using the algorithms in (1) and (2) and provide IABIN with a detailed evaluation of all its primary biodiversity data. To finalize and implement a Java-based algorithm for the training of niche models (using a maximum entropy approach) and apply it to plant taxa with enough data located in South America. To overlay the developed geographic distributions with ecosystem threat, and protected areas layers, generate analysis metrics to provide the necessary background data for scenario assessment and policy making for South America. The development of an interactive Google maps-based interface to navigate through the biodiversity data and the modeling and overlaying results. To generate the appropriate documentation and reports on the developed tools. For more information, visit http://code.google.com/p/iabin-threats/ Donor: The General Secretariat of the Organization of American States Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela      Climate Change, Ecosystem Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1584 RENATA applied in generating solutions to environmental information, vegetation cover, and land-use change in Colombia, accessing spatially distributed databases managed with remote applications Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-12-17  2011-06-17  This project aims to develop a methodology for integrating RENATA with an information tool that allows remote access to spatially distributed databases as well as spatial modeling applications for the scientific community and general public. This is in order to generate up-to-date information on the themes of vegetation cover, land-use change, and environmental information for Colombia, with a basis in MODIS and GEOS data, and with climate and environmental modeling processes. --------------------------------------------- Spanish Version: RENATA aplicada en la generacion de soluciones de informacion ambiental, coberturas vegetales y cambio de uso de suelo para Colombia, accediendo a bases de datos especiales distribuidas y su manejo con aplicativos remotos. Desarrollar una metodología integrando RENATA con una herramienta de informática que permita el acceso en forma remota tanto a bases de datos distribuidos espaciales geográficos como también a aplicativos de modelación espacial, para la comunidad científica y al pueblo en general, para generar información actualizada y permanente en los temas de coberturas vegetales y cambio de uso del suelo e información ambiental para Colombia, con base en datos MODIS y GOES y con procesos de modelación climática y ambiental.   Donor: Colciencias Colombia      Ecosystem Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1582 Breaking the spiral of unsustainability in arid and semi-arid areas in Latin America using an ecosystems approach for co-innovation of farm livelihoods Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-02-01  2010-01-31  Reversing the unsustainable use of natural and agro-resources and insufficient economic results as envisaged by the Convention on Biological Diversity requires rethinking of entire livelihood strategies in a systemic way. Quantitative systemic approaches are as yet rarely adopted but highly promising for livelihood innovation. This project combines available participatory methods for innovation with a toolkit of quantitative ecosystem simulation models in an approach for co-innovation by scientists and stakeholders. The approach is applied in three case study areas in Argentina, Mexico, and Uruguay with varying degrees of human activity pressure to evaluate the added value of the quantitative systems outlook. Donor: Wageningen Agricultural University Argentina, Mexico, Uruguay      Agrobiodiversity, Ecosystem Management, Land Management  Mark Lundy   
1580 Developing New Pro-Poor Business Models in the LAC Region in Partnership with the Private Sector Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-12-08  2010-12-31  Through this project, CIAT aimed to contribute to the development of effective linkages between the IFAD Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) division, key private sector firms, and international NGOs to improve the effectiveness and impact of IFAD investments in smallholder agriculture in LAC. We also provided training and coaching to selected IFAD projects in LAC, focusing on methods and tools for the development of successful value chains to IFAD implementation teams in LAC. Donor: International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Colombia, Dominican Republic, Guatemala      Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Mark Lundy   
1576 Linking Communities in SouthEast Asia to Forestry-Related Voluntary Carbon Markets World Agroforestry Centre  2011-04-15  2012-04-14  The following activies will be undertaken in this project: 1. A business portfolio alighned with the Climate , Community and Biodiversity standards (CCBS) 2. Conduct an Environmental Service (ES) market fair/ES Buyers forum organized in Manila, the Philippines promoting the Kalahan people's potential for inclusion in a carbon-offset scheme as well as other ES such as water and agro-biodiversity 3. Build local capacities in negotiation and facilitate the negotiations with potential buyers of environmental services Key project outputs are: Project outputs are as follows: 1. A forestry and environmental services voluntary carbon market business portfolio alighed with the CLimate, Community and Biodiversity Standards (CCBS), Carbon Fix Standard (CFS) and Voluntary Carbon Standards (VCS). The portfolio should include scientific data of professional standards on carbon sequestration, biodiversity, watershed, and the socioeconomic conditions of the Kalahan forest reserve and the peoples within. 2. Both secondary and primary data on community benefit to be derived from afforestation/reaforestation (A/R) efforts in addition to possible payments from the Voluntary Carbon Market. 3. A written report on the conducted environmental service market fair and awareness building forum Philippines  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access  Ujjwal Pradhan   
1575 Amazon Initiative Ecoregional program (AI-EP) World Agroforestry Centre  2011-05-27  2011-09-30  This programme aims to contribute to the improvement of rural livelihoods and to the conservation of the Amazon ecosystem through research for development. This goal is to be achieved through the development and adoption of "Sustainable Land Use Systems for the Prevention, Reduction and Reversion of Resource Degradation". The AI-EP will incorporate innovative, collaborative strategies for the production of international public goods contributing to the achievement of Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) in the Amazon. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2    Agrobiodiversity, Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Roberto Porro   
1570 Enhancing livelihood opportunities of smallholders in Asia: Linking smallholder sweet sorghum farmers to the bioethanol industry International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-12-11  2013-12-10  The proposal focuses on sweet sorghum; a feedstock that does not compete with food production but produces food as well as fuel, and may even enhance food production by stimulating increased input use and crop management intensity.  Providing competitive, remunerative options suitable to sweet sorghum cultivation and marketing by dryland poor will help ensure that the biofuels revolution aids the sustainable development of the poor in the drylands, rather than bypassing or marginalizing them.  The project aims to demonstrate a successful model for up and out scaling the sweet sorghum cultivation for ethanol production to increase the farmers’ incomes, without compromising the food or fodder needs of farmers. This paves way for most efficient whole plant utilization of sweet sorghum, a promising crop for the tropics particularly in the light of climate change. The project aims to increase the area of sweet sorghum from negligible area at present to 1500 ha by the end of the project directly benefiting at least 2000 farmers in each participating country (India, Thailand and China) through centralized model (within 50 km radius) and additional 200 ha each in India and Thailand through decentralized model (beyond 50 km radius) benefiting 200 farmers additionally in each country. China, India, Thailand    Liaoning Provincial Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Marathwada Agricultural University,Parbhani,India, Suphan Buri Field Crops Research Center, Thailand  Crops, Market Access  Belum Reddy  A Ashok Kumar, CLL Gowda, K Parthasarathy Rao, P Srinivasa Rao 
1569 Development of sustainable soil fertility management for sorghum and sweet sorghum through effective use of biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-05-01  2012-04-30  The aim of the Project is 1) to obtain evidence of the existence of BNI function under field conditions, 2) to make quantitative evaluation of nitrogen dynamics in sorghum and sweet sorghum fields and clarify how and how much BNI affects the dynamics, and 3) to develop a new nitrogen fertilization guideline for sweet sorghum through adequate management of BNI. India    Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS)  Crops, Soils  Suhas Wani  A Ashok Kumar, KL Sahrawat, Gopalakrishnan S 
1567 Backstopping and Coordinating the Fertilizer Microdosing and Inventory Credit System Project in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-06-01  2012-05-31  The purpose of this project is to coordinate and backstop the scaling up of the microdose technique and warrantage system to enable resource poor farmers to improve their farm productivity, food security and incomes through increased access to and use of fertilizers, and access to output markets Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger    Institut d’Economie Rural (IER)- Mali, Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Burkina Faso, Institut de Recherches Agronomiques du Niger (INRAN), Niger  Crops, Policy & Institutions  Mahamadou Gandah  Jupiter Ndjeunga 
1566 Introduction and Expansion of Improved Pigeonpea (Arhar) Production Technology in Rainfed Upland Ecosystems of Orissa International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2011-06-17  2015-06-16   The overall goal of this project is to enhance food and nutritional security and income generation for the under privileged farmers of rainfed areas of Orissa Objectives To evaluate and identify newly developed high yielding disease resistant varieties and hybrids of pigeonpea for further introduction and expansion  Promote cultivation of high yielding pigeonpea varieties in the marginal soils. To develop village-level seed systems to achieve self-sufficiency in seed of farmer-preferred improved varieties of pigeonpea. Capacity building of farmers, NGOs, and Self Help Groups in sustainable pigeonpea production technology components. Enhance profitability by linking production with dal processing and marketing. To provide research backstopping for refinement and research on pigeonpea components as identified by researchers and farmers in the target area     India      Crops, Seed Systems, Soils  K B Saxena  CLL Gowda, Isabel Vales, Myer Mula, Suresh Pande 
1565 Improving Groundnut Farmers’ Incomes and Nutrition through Innovation and Technology Enhancement (I-FINITE) International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2011-05-01  2012-10-31  The purpose of this project is to increase the incomes of smallholder farmers producing groundnuts in four districts in the Eastern Province of Zambia (Chipata, Katete, Petauke, and Lundazi). This will be achieved through three approaches: (1) innovative partnerships with the NARS, University of Zambia, Tuskegee University (USA), and the USDA National Peanut Research Laboratory, Georgia, USA, for technology development including genomics  research; (2) development of Crop Management Strategies and Seed Systems that will enhance productivity and link farmers to markets; and (3) development of low-cost technologies for the control and determination of Aflatoxin Contamination; and establishment of systems of Grades and Standards to enhance traceability. The proposed strategy will address specific supply-and-demand problems in the groundnut sub-sector in the Eastern Province of Zambia that may provide lessons for other provinces in which this crop is produced. The project will utilize the products of crop improvement to increase productivity and to endow groundnuts with market-acceptable traits and with better quality to tap into regional and international markets. The project will promote marketing innovations that emphasize efficiency and reduce transaction costs. Grain marketing will be improved by the strengthening of farmer organizations to establish rural collection points to enhance collective marketing and serve as mechanisms for grain assembly and grading. The gains in market efficiency and reduced transactions costs will be translated into higher grain prices for producers, and will result in increased incomes for rural households. Project activities involving training will strengthen the capacity of national agricultural research systems (NARES) and the University of Zambia in demand-driven technology development. The capacity of farmer organizations and entrepreneurs in collective marketing, enterprise development and negotiation will also be strengthened. The combination of increased productivity and better linkages to markets will strengthen the competitive position of farmer organizations and traders. Zambia    Tuskegee University, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), University of Zambia  Crops, Market Access, Seed Systems  Moses Siambi  Alastair Orr, Dave Harris, Emmanuel Monyo, Santie De Villiers, Samuel Njoroge, Said Silim 
1556 Science-led Consortium Approach for Inclusive Market Oriented Development through Suvarna Bhoomi Yojane in Karnataka International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2011-06-25  2012-07-24  The overall goal of this initiative is to improve the livelihoods of small and marginal farm house holds through enabling farmers to shift from low-value subsistence crops to high-value fruit and vegetable crops. A secondary objective is to achieve this using sustainable management practices.  The specific objectives are as follows:  To form a multi-institution consortium comprising ICRISAT, AVDRC,  NGOs, private sector industries, University of Horticulture, SAUs, and Department of Horticulture to implement e Suvarna Bhoomi Yojane in 25 selected districts. To understand input and output market value chains and identify market linkages for high-volume fruits and vegetable crops for farmers under SBY. To implement a  science-based strategy for sustainable production of high-value crops To build capacity of the consortium partners to manage  the  SBY project and undertake capacity building of stakeholders  in the value chain, especially farmers. To monitor, evaluate and document progress, impacts  and lessons learnt on consortium formation and  functionfor strengthening the SBY. India    BAIF Development Research Foundation, BASIX Group, Department of Horticulture, Karnataka, India, Department of Watershed Development, Karnataka, India, Myrada, University of Agricultural Science, Bangalore, India, University of Agricultural sciences ,Dharwad (UAS-D),India, University of Agricultural Sciences, Raichur, University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot, World Vegetable Centre (AVRDC)  Crops, Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Policy & Institutions, Soils, Water Management  Suhas Wani  CLL Gowda, Girish Chander, G RangaRao, Gajanan L Sawargaonkar, KH KH Anantha, AVR KesavaRao, KL Sahrawat, P Pathak 
1552 Community management of crop diversity to enhance resilience, yield stability and income generation in changing West African climates International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2008-05-01  2011-12-31  The goal of this research-action project is to enhance farm community resilience, production stability and income generation in West Africa under variable and changing climates by enriching agro-biodiversity management across a climatic gradient. Participatory, gender-aware co-learning activities on how to use intra- and inter-specific crop diversity (including dual-purpose, biofuel, vegetable, tree crops) and natural resource management (NRM) will engage farmers, extension personnel and scientists in selected communities at risk in the Sahelian, Sudanian and North Guinean zones of Niger, Burkina Faso, Mali and Ghana. Detailed environmental data combined with genotype × environment × management (G×E×M) interactions modeling will provide insight into future scenarios and identify best options for crop diversity management under climate change. Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Niger    AGRHYMET regional centre,Niger, Institut d’Economie Rural (IER)- Mali, Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Burkina Faso, Institut de Recherches Agronomiques du Niger (INRAN), Niger, Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, University of Hohenheim, Germany  Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change  C Tom Hash   
1550 Tackling abiotic production constraints in pearl millet and sorghum-based agricultural systems of the West African Sahel International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-04-01  2013-03-31  Using an integrated genetic and natural resource management (IGNRM) approach, this project aims at enhancing adaptation of pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.] and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] to low-phosphorus (P) soils and water stress in the Sahelian zone of West Africa (WA). A combination of physiological experiments, classical and marker-assisted breeding research, and agronomic studies is used to tackle the combined effects of low soil P and droughts on pearl millet and sorghum growth in West Africa’s smallholder cereal production systems. In a step-wise approach the studies will unravel available genetic diversity for low-P tolerance and enhance the understanding of the relative importance of low soil P and water stress, and their interaction, for cereal productivity in the Sahel. New crop manage­ment tech­niques beyond fertilizer micro-dosing will be developed and tested, such as seed coating with P, promotion of symbiosis with vesicular-arbuscular mycor­rhiza (VAM) and on-farm processing of rock phosphate (RP), to help en­hancing produc­tivity under Sahelian abiotic stress conditions. A strong focus on farmer experimen­tation with adapted cereal culti­vars and new crop management options will help validating these tech­ni­ques and contribute to early adoption and project impact. Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, Senegal    INERA, Burkina Faso, Institut d’Economie Rural (IER)- Mali, Institut de Recherches Agronomiques du Niger (INRAN), Niger, Institut Sénégalais de Recherches Agricoles (ISRA), University of Hohenheim, Germany, University of kassel-Witzenhausen(UKW),Germany  Crops, Soils  C Tom Hash  E Weltzien, Fred Rattunde, Vincent Vadez 
1547 Enhancing sorghum grain yield and quality for the Sudano-Sahelian zone of West Africa using the Backcross Nested Association Mapping (BCNAM) approach International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-07-01  2014-06-30  Sorghum improvement in Africa deals with a wide range of harsh and highly variable environments. The local varieties are specifically adapted to the biotic and abiotic constraints and have an excellent grain quality but with low yield potentials. Sorghum breeding programs in West Africa must work with a considerable number of traits, and address the specific adaptation requirements for specific and variable agro-ecologies. This project will enhance the capacity of national and international breeding programs while using sorghum germplasm diversity and advanced molecular tools. This project will result in the development of modified backcross populations that will be of long-term value in relating sorghum traits to their corresponding genes. The planned population structure will facilitate the QTL mapping of range of traits conditioning productivity, adaptation, and preferred grain quality traits. Forty to fifty populations of 100 lines each will be developed from back-crosses carried out with 3 recurrent parents which represent the target ideotypes to be improved. The donor parents include 10 common donors and 20 specific donors representing the diversity of the improved and local varieties. The capacity of National breeding programs will be strengthened by creating a regional data management unit within the IER (Mali), which will support scientists in the effective application and use of molecular data for improved effectiveness of sorghum breeding activities. Mali    Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), IER  Crops  E Weltzien  C Tom Hash, Fred Rattunde, Ibrahima Sissoko, Shah Trushar 
1083 Learning the lessons of Rift Valley fever: Improved detection and mitigation of outbreaks International Livestock Research Institute  2007-04-01  2008-03-31  This project has two components: Participatory assessment of Rift Valley fever (RVF) surveillance and rapid response activities Economic impact assessment and identification of cost-effective mitigation measures The first component is aimed at assessing the 2007 outbreak of RVF in Kenya in order to identify key lessons on how to better predict, detect and respond to RVF. This will also provide information on how to better engage decision-makers to act promptly and appropriately in response to future outbreaks of the disease. The second component of the project will leverage the information generated from the participatory assessment towards developing tools that improve risk management and decision making for future RVF outbreaks. This will facilitate planning of governmental and non-governmental preparedness, develop better contingency plans and better inform public policy in case of subsequent outbreaks in terms of the impact of uncontrolled disease and cost-effectiveness of measures. Objectives Component 1 To describe the symptoms of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in livestock and people, and assess the socio-cultural and economic determinants of knowledge and effectiveness of interventions as perceived by stakeholders in order to develop better surveillance and response systems. To assess stakeholders’ perceptions on the impact of RVF at the household to the local market level. To evaluate the local and national response capacity using key informant interviews and data collection in governmental and non-governmental organizations. To foster communication between public health and livestock professionals and between professionals and the communities. Component 2 To assess the economic impact of RVF at local and national levels. To assess and prioritize the cost-effectiveness of disease control options from a multi-sectoral perspective. To analyze intervention scenarios and provide recommendations that identify preferred strategies and steps needed to create institutional change to enhance the capacity to mitigate future outbreaks. Funding: United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Kenya  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2    Livestock  Jeff Mariner  Christine Jost, Francis Wanyoike, Karl Rich 
1525 A systematic review of zoonoses transmission and livestock-wildlife interactions International Livestock Research Institute  2010-07-01  2011-12-31  Around 60% of all human pathogens are zoonoses and domestic animals and wildlife are of equal importance as reservoir hosts.  Moreover, 75% of emerging infectious diseases are zoonoses and most emerge from wildlife. The objective of this study is to synthesize best available scientific knowledge about zoonotic disease transmission through direct or indirect interactions between domestic livestock and wildlife. Emphasis is on risk factors, drivers and trajectories of transmission, and promising interventions for controlling important zoonoses based on managing domestic livestock/wildlife interaction. The review considers eight themes: Transmission routes and wildlife Pathogen recombination Risk factors for transmission Drivers influencing interaction Historical changes and trends Livestock production systems Socio-economic, institutional and political factors Risk management and control Kenya  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  Royal Veterinary College (RVC)  Livestock  Delia Grace  Bryony Jones, Declan McKeever, Florence Mutua, John McDermott, Jemimah Njuki, Mohammed Said, Polly Ericksen, Dirk Pfeiffer, Richard Kock, Silvia Alonso 
1521 Sustainable Development of Depressions in Pastoral Ecosystems in Syria and Azerbaijan International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-07-01  2011-12-31  The project aims at improving the livelihoods of rural communities in Syria and Azerbaijan through capacity building. The Project will promote the sustainable use of technologies for improving the productivity of depressions in rangelands and providing additional feed and food, while conserving the environment and bio-diversity. Azerbaijan, Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6    Land Management  Kamel Shideed  Kamel Shideed 
1519 Testing of Fungicides against Cereal Diseases International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-01-01  2012-02-29  The aim of this project is to evaluate the foliar disease control (activity and persistence) of various seed treatments Morocco, Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Seed Systems  Kumarse Nazari  Kumarse Nazari 
1517 Impacts of Small Scale Farmers Union on Rural Livelihoods in Egypt and Morocco International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-07-01  2011-06-30  The Project aims at improving livelihoods and market access of small-scale farmers in the marginal and remote regions of Egypt and Morocco (hereinafter referred to as the "Beneficiary Countries"). The Project will analyze the impact of small scale famer unions on market access and rural livelihoods, in order to develop policy recommendations and guidelines for enhancing the capacity and effectiveness of small scale farmers unions. Egypt, Morocco  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Aden Aw-Hassan  Aden Aw-Hassan 
1516 Agricultural risk management and impact studies in Syria International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-03-01  2011-12-31  This project aims to accomplish the following:  Develop a sector model for Syrian Agriculture (Agro-Syria Model) • Apply the developed model for analysis of selected policy scenarios In achieving these objectives ICARDA will invite the relevant experts from the University of Naples, Italy to participate in the various research activities and cover their costs.Conduct a study on agricultural risk management utilizing the outcomes of the following side studies: - Study on the rural funding institutions - Study on the institutions working in the rural areas in Syria and their role in development - Study on the social security network Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8    Policy & Institutions  Aden Aw-Hassan  Aden Aw-Hassan 
1513 Impacts of Small Scale Farmers Union on Rural Livelihoods in Egypt and Morocco International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-07-01  2011-07-31  The Project aims at improving livelihoods and market access of small-scale farmers in the marginal and remote regions of Egypt and Morocco (hereinafter referred to as the "Beneficiary Countries"). The Project will analyze the impact of small scale famer unions on market access and rural livelihoods, in order to develop policy recommendations and guidelines for enhancing the capacity and effectiveness of small scale farmers unions. Egypt, Morocco  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Aden Aw-Hassan  Aden Aw-Hassan 
1511 Collaborative Project “Rapid generation advancement of Korean barley lines through the Double Haploid Technology”. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-01-01  2011-12-31  The project aims to produce Korean barley lines with improved agronomic traits and high end-use quality characteristics using well-developed doubled haploid production system of ICARDA. Korea  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+3    Climate Change, Crops  Michael Baum  Michael Baum 
1506 Measuring and Assessing the Impacts of the Diffusion of Improved Crop Varieties in Africa International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-11-30  2012-12-01  This project includes the following objectives:Objective 1: To attain a wider understanding of key aspects of the performance of food-crop genetic improvement in priority country-by-commodity combinations in Sub-Saharan Africa Objective 2: To verify and gain a deeper understanding about the adoption and diffusion of new varieties in selected priority countries and food crops in Sub-Saharan Africa. Ethiopia, Nigeria  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8  Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), NARS  Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change  Aden Aw-Hassan  Aden Aw-Hassan 
1505 Strategic Dual Purpose Crops and Mobilization of Underutilized Plants as Part of a Climate Change Adaptation Strategy International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-08-01  2011-12-31  The primary aim of this project is to create a win-win-situation for landless rural poor and the environment by establishing long-term-regulations for land-use of abandoned, partly saline land with the Hakim (regional governor) and by identifying optimal groups of plants to increase forage production and to prevent desertification. The poor will plant alleys of fast growing shrubs (Kochia, Attriplex and Salsola) in pure stands or in combination as windbreakers alternating with strips of drought and salt tolerant dualpurpose- crops (e.g. sorghum, pearl millet). These green barriers will prevent loss of high endemic biodiversity in uphill areas. Additionally the multiplication and conservation of important medicinal and dyeing plants will be initiated. Thus an integrated agro-pastoralmodel will be developed as a strategic measure against desertification. The project will give deep insight on socio-economic capacity of such villages. Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Land Management  Kamel Shideed  Kamel Shideed 
1503 Empowering rural women in the Eastern Middle Atlas Mountain zones of Morocco through sustainable management of aromatic and medicinal plants International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-12-21  2012-12-31  The goal of this project is to empower rural women in the estern middle Atlas Mountain zones through production diversification linked to improved natural resources management and conservation, thus contributing to more sustainable income sources.   The objective is to increase and diversify sources of income of rural women in IFAD's project area through an enhanced AMP value chain. This will contribute to women's empowerment and to the sustainable management of natural resources. Morocco  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6    Agrobiodiversity, Market Access  Mohammed Mourid  Kamel Shideed 
1499 Conservation Agriculture for the Irrigated Areas in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2011-05-20  2013-05-19  This project will accomplish the following: i) Overall technical in-country implementation of the project under the supervisIon of FAO/SEC and the national Ministries and in co-ordination with competent local institutes and agencies. ii) Provide full logistical and operational support for FAO experts vlsltmg Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, in the framework of the project. Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Land Management  Jozef Turok  Kamel Shideed 
1497 Collaboration in the joint ICARDA-ARC Wheat Improvement Program International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-12-01  2020-12-01  the objectives of this project are to develop wheat germplasm with the attributes for irrigation in Central and west Asia and North Africa (including high yield potential, heat tolerance, good grain quality and resistance to diseases and insect pests), and to make the germplasm freely available, in the form of international nurseries, to national wheat breeding programs Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops  Osman Abdalla  Michael Baum 
1494 Program for enhancing food security and livelihood of rural poor communities in Palestine International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-10-15  2012-10-15  The program has four objectives: Objective 1: Increase productivity and sustainability of rainfed food crops and improve efficiency of the seed production system in the West Bank (WB). Objective 2: Safe and productive use of treated wastewater and greywater in the WB. Objective 3: Safe and productive use of treated wastewater and greywater in Gaza. Objective 4: Improve productivity and quality of protected agriculture production in Gaza. West Bank and Gaza      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Land Management, Soils, Water Management  Nasri Haddad  Kamel Shideed 
1492 Sustainable food security and poverty reduction in Afghanistan through capacity development, research, and technology transfer in the agriculture sector of Afghanistan International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-01-15  2012-01-15  The overall objectives of the project are to support the efforts of the government of Afghanistan to sustainably improve the food security and reduce poverty through capacity development, research, and technology transfer in the agriculture sector. The project is focusing on the province of Urzgan while conducting some trials using the “mirror approach” in other provinces, and addressing the problem of capacity development at the national level. This approach ensures continuity of work and collection of useful data even if the project has had to abandon some of the experimental sites owing to security risks. Afghanistan      Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Seed Systems  Javed Rizvi  Kamel Shideed 
1490 Breeding Chickpea for Drought Tolerance and Disease Resistance International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-05-01  2013-06-30  This project will use genetic and agronomic manipulation to enhance production and productivity of chickpea. It will attempt to develop efficient and reliable field and laboratory screening techniques for the evaluation of germplasm and breeding materials for biotic and abiotic stresses, understand their genetic bases, and develop efficient and high yielding cultivars with combined resistances to these stresses through conventional and molecular breeding approaches. The results of this project will be shared with WANA NARES institutions and in areas with similar environments in Australia. It will be conducted with ICARDA, GRDC, and in collaboration with selected NARES institutions Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Monaco, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+4    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops  Michael Baum  Michael Baum 
1488 Enhancement of yield and yield stability of Spring Bread Wheat in Semi-Arid Mediterranean Areas of Central and West Asia and North Africa International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-05-01  2013-06-30  This project aims at enhancing bread wheat productivity and yield stability in dry areas with similarity to the Australian wheat environment. Additional to this, the project aims to: i) Identify and develop new germ plasm , high yielding under terminal heat, With broad/or regional adaptation, suitable for use as parental material for breeding. ii) Identify traits or sets of traits that determine or improve adaptation of wheat to terminal heat stress in a range of wheat production environments . iii) Transfer reputed heat tolerance genes into Australian elite wheat backgrounds. iv) Identify molecular markers closely linked to heat tolerance genes and validate them in Australian wheat backgrounds. v) Identify potentially new sources of resistance to fungal diseases, insects pests and incorporate those into adapted Australian genetic backgrounds to broaden the genetic base of resistance to diseases and insects pests. vi) Develop mapping populations for major wheat insects pests and fungal pathogens and collaborate with Australian researchers to maps QTL controlling them Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops  Francis Ogbonnaya  Michael Baum 
1487 Utilization of wild relatives of wheat in developing salinity tolerant winter wheat with improved quality for Central Asia International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-01-01  2012-12-31  This project will include the following activities: Collect wheat progenitors (Aegilops tauschii and wild tetraploids) species from saline areas of Central Asia o Test the progenitors and other collections (synthetic hexaploid wheat from ICARDA, CIMMYT) for new sources for tolerance to salinity and end-use quality o Produce new synthetics using progenitor species o Transfer salinity tolerance and improved quality into locally adapted wheat cultivars o Test advanced backcross populations in winter wheat background for their potential for yield and quality improvement in Central Asia o Develop linked molecular markers to salinity tolerance and improved quality o Provide training on synthetic wheat technologies to the scientists from the Central Asia o Out-scale improved technologies through trainings and two workshops, leaflets and a handbook in Russian language, and scientific publications Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2  NARS, University of Bonn  Climate Change, Crops, Soils  Francis Ogbonnaya  Michael Baum 
1480 Young Professionals’ Platform on Agricultural Research for Development (YPARD) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-04-01  2012-04-30  YPARD is an international movement by young professionals for young professionals in Agricultural Research for Development (ARD). YPARD operates as a network; it is not a formalized institution. CIAT is colaborating YPARD through the following activities: Developing content for the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) section on www.ypard.net Identifying potential new members. Promoting YPARD when attending workshops and events in the course of ongoing work. Exploring and actively seeking funding at the regional level. Engaging in a brainstorming process with regional and national representatives and YPARD LAC members on areas of focus and ways ahead for the region. Ensuring YPARD representation at the regional FORAGRO meeting to discuss about YPARD and distribute promotional materials. Facilitating YPARD LAC relevant participation in virtual and face-to-face regional events. Designing and publications of a printed media regarding the YPARD LAC experience Donor: Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Policy & Institutions  Simone Staiger   
1479 Combining administrative, technical and financial resources for the hydrological modeling of watersheds in the Corpoguavio region of Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-04-01  2012-04-30  For the purpose of generating knowledge and options for the implementation of environmental payment schemes and compensations in the Corpoguavio region, this project aims to: Construct a database of soils, climate and land use for the watershed of Corpoguavio, for the purpose of hydrological modeling with SWAT. Develop the hydrological baseline for the watersheds that form part of the Corpoguavio jurisdiction using hydrological modeling with SWAT. Calibrate and validate the SWAT model using available depth-measuring data (and where possible, sediments). Prioritize the most important areas for their water yield and for their potential for improving the flow of hydrological environmental services to the jurisdiction. Recommend what type of information should currently be improved in order to strengthen hydrological modeling in the future. Carry out meetings for exchanging experiences between institutions about the design and implementation of financial or economic mechanisms for the provision of environmental services, in order to generate recommendations for decision makers working in the area of study at the national level. Donor: Patrimonio Natural Colombia      Ecosystem Management, Water Management  Marcela Quintero   
1478 Tortillas on the roaster: Central America maize-bean systems and the changing climate Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-03-01  2011-12-31  This project seeks to contribute to more resilient maize-bean production systems and to increasing the capacity of vulnerable farmers to adapt to climate change by achieving the following outputs: Downscaled global and regional climate models to local levels (increased resolution). Predicted impact of climate change on the maize and bean production systems in Central America including yield, quality, pests and diseases, and their interactions. Quantified impacts on maize-bean production systems and their consequences on socio-economic indicators such as farmers’ livelihoods, income and gender and also on food safety, migration patterns, human health and water/land conflicts. Adaptation hot spots identified. Local adaptation and mitigation strategies developed using participatory methods. To achieve the above outputs we plan to work along two main activity lines: A) the analyses of climate change impact and B) the targeting of future interventions. Donor: Howard Buffet Foundation El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4  Catholic Relief Services (CRS), International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)  Climate Change, Crops  Peter Laderach   
1477 Development and evaluation of genetic resources of Lycopersicon spp. for use in the genetic improvement of Solanaceous in the face of biotic and abiotic stresses Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-04-01  2014-04-30  This project aims to lay the foundation for the development of platform technologies, promote the use of genetic resources and generate products in species of the Solanaceae family, especially the tomato, to counteract the effects of climate change on agriculture and the economies of Latin American countries. Researchers will develop appropriate tools and knowledge of aspects of pre-breeding in the Latin American countries as a basis for use in programs aimed at obtaining commercial tomato varieties with characteristics of abiotic stress tolerance and pathogen resistance to cope with the impacts of climate change. Donor: Fontagro (through INIA, Chile) Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Spain  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops  Andrew Jarvis  Nora Castañeda 
1474 Coffee and Climate Change Programme Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-03-01  2011-08-31  The objective of this project is to project future and existing climate change scenarios and analyze the differences, the coincidences, and the comparability of applied underlying methodologies. Researchers will design future climate change scenarios indicating adaptability of coffee under climate change conditions for plantation zones in Brazil, Guatemala, Tanzania, and Vietnam. The future changes and impacts will be projected for the years 2000 (average climate between 1960 and 2000), 2020, and 2050. Donor: German Corporation for International Cooperation (GIZ-BMZ) Brazil, Guatemala, Tanzania, Vietnam  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Climate Change, Crops  Peter Laderach   
1473 Participation and social inclusion in research and development projects in rural areas Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-03-01  2014-02-28  The purpose of the project is to improve the knowledge and capacity of different development organizations and the government to leverage projects and appropriate government policies oriented to effectively link farmers to markets with socially inclusive results. Researchers will analyze the state of the art conceptual approaches to participation, intervention strategies and institutional arrangements that encourage or limit the development of market-led participatory methodologies, as well as the extent to which these have contributed to the social inclusion of smallholder farmers. The project will also analyze and describe the role and the processes carried out by the support organizations (private and public) in each one of the selected cases to influence more socially inclusive results in development projects when applying market-led participatory methodologies. Finally we will determine the successful factors, the obstacles, and lessons learnt in the application of the market-led participatory approaches used in the selected case studies and suggest strategies and methodologies that permit social inclusion of smallholder and marginalized actors (women and indigenous people) in Bolivia. Donor: The McKnight Foundation Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Carolina Gonzalez   
1472 Consulting IFAD on poor rural farmers’ access to markets in Latin America and the Caribbean Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-04-01  2012-12-31  For this project CIAT has been solicited by IFAD to provide advice on issues related to market access for poor farmers. This knowledge will be used to generate specific knowledge documents to facilitate the design, development, and evaluation of projects which focus on access to Latin American and Caribbean markets. Donor: International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Paraguay, Peru  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Mark Lundy   
1471 Identifying CWR gaps for 80 genepools conserved ex-situ within the ‘Adapting agriculture to climate change: Collecting, protecting and preparing crop wild relatives’ project Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-01-01  2013-12-31  Crop wild relatives (CWR) are used as a source of genes to adapt crops to harsh environmental conditions such as drought, extreme temperatures, and flooding. From the total number of accessions conserved in ex situ collections, only 18% corresponds to CWR (FAO, 2010). Several taxon continue unrepresented and conservation actions are needed. Spatial analyses, based on geographical information systems (GIS), are used as tools to identify taxonomic, geographic and environmental gaps in ex situ collections, easing the process of taxon prioritization (based in identified gaps and threats to biodiversity) and producing information for guiding future collecting missions. These analyses require environmental variables and known presence registers as inputs, they also use modeling algorithms where reliability and performance will depend on the amount of data available and its quality. Despite the global effort to make biological information publicly available (i.e. GBIF), information is still lacking for some CWR taxon, leading to low performance models unsuitable for the gap analysis. Under the current project, three different stages are planned: Gathering data from alternative sources to ensure robust and reliable models Improving gap analysis methodology, including threat assessment, and Making final results available for final users (NARS) through a website. Donor: Global Crop Diversity Trust Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Climate Change, Crops, Ecosystem Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1470 Application of scientific methods to implement, generate, adjust, and validate methodologies and technologies that allow the documentation of recovery and conservation indicators of soil productive capacity under alternative systems in Laguna Fuquene and surrounds Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-02-01  2012-02-29  Activities of this project include: Hydrological modeling to simulate the effects of conservation agriculture on the environmental services provided by the hydrological basin, based on existing information. Install plots with prioritized livestock and farming systems. Determine soil loss using USLE, rainfall simulators, and runoff plots. Measurement of soil characteristics in plots with and without conservation agriculture and with different types of coverage. Conduct socio-economic surveys of producers in the Fuquene basin to assess impacts on income and poverty. Hydrological modeling to simulate effects of conservation agriculture on the environmental services provided by the hydrological basin, based on new information gathered in the field. Determine environmental indicators for monitoring soil and water resources. Design a benefit distribution system that puts value on the environmental services that the well-managed areas in the basin provide. Donor: Corporacion Autonoma de Cundinamarca (CAR) Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Soils  Marcela Quintero   
1469 COMPANDES: Benefit-Sharing Mechanisms to improve water productivity and reduce water-related conflicts in selected basins Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-12-01  2013-12-31  The goal of this work is to define the terms that will promote voluntary participation in benefit sharing mechanisms (BSM) in order to increase the likelihood of sustained compliance. Research methods will focus on participatory visioning and constraints analysis carried out at the local level in the defined basins. The resolution of such land-water use conflicts will contribute to improving the livelihoods of stakeholders. Local and regional governance will also benefit because resources and efforts can be redirected to other urgent problems. Social organization will become more inclusive and focused to deal with peoples’ demands in closer contact with policy-makers at local scales. Finally, downstream water users will have a more abundant and reliable supply of clean water while upstream communities will benefit from investments that improve the productivity of their agroecosystems. In return, upstream communities should agree to cease the unsustainable exploitation of catchment areas that are key to downstream water supply. Donor: Challenge Program on Water and Food (through King’s College London) Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, United Kingdom  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Andrew Jarvis   
1468 Zoning coffee quality in the northern region of Nicaragua to identify potential sites with geographical indication and/or designation of origin Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-02-01  2012-07-31  This project aims to establish geographical indicators and demarcate zones for the designation of origin of different coffee varieties in northern Nicaragua. Activities include the analyses of the quality attributes and coffee profiles and their interaction with the environmental variables. In conjunction with the UNI, we will carry out first pilot consensus workshops in the designation of origin. We also plan to design an atlas of coffee quality in Nicaragua, with an emphasis on the northern zone, and contribute to the training and education of local workers who are members of the alliance institutions. Donor: National University of Engineering, Nicaragua Nicaragua  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Crops  Peter Laderach  Carlos Zelaya 
1467 Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation through Alternative Landuses in Rainforests of the Tropics (REDD ALERT) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-05-01  2012-05-31  The overall goal of the project is to contribute to the development and evaluation of market and non-market mechanisms and the institutions needed at multiple levels for changing stakeholder behavior in order to slow deforestation rates of tropical landscapes and hence reduce GHG emissions.  Donor: European Commission (through Macaulay Land Use Research Institute) Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions  Glenn Hyman   
1466 Integrated management of watersheds, water and sanitation (MARENA-PIMCHAS) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-04-01  2011-12-31  The purpose of the project is to oversee the design and execution of the monitoring and evaluation systems of the PIMCHAS project, run by the Nicaraguan Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (MARENA) which aims to improve the quality of life and economic welfare of the residents of the semi arid areas of northern Nicaragua through the improved management and use of water. Objectives include: To measure project performance according to the project aims, and to evaluate the impact of activities on the target population, identifying the catalysts and obstacles to supporting timely decision making. To support the development and strengthening of local capacity for monitoring their own conditions and situation, and making decisions consistent with their objectives of improving the quality and standard of living. Donor: Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Nicaragua  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4  CARE  Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Water Management  María Eugenia Baltodano   
1465 Proposal for a java development team based at CIAT providing expanded GBIF portal functionality “IMS Data Portal Phase I” Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-12-01  2011-09-30  The main aim of this project is to develop and implement, using Java programming language, tools for the correction, verification, organization, and analysis of passport data from different providers currently held in the GBIF database. Donor: Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Agrobiodiversity  Andrew Jarvis   
1464 Coffee Under Pressure (CUP): Adapting to climate change in Mesoamerica Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-06-01  2014-05-31  With the overall objective of helping smallholder coffee farmers in Central America and Mexico adapt to the impacts of climate change, the specific activities of this project include: Predict the future suitability and distribution of GMCR coffee sourcing areas. Evaluate possible impacts of climate change on coffee quality and quantity. Identify alternative crops suitable under predicted climate change scenarios for key regions. Evaluate the implications of changes in coffee quality and quantity in three case study sites on social parameters (income, poverty, equity etc). Accompany farmer organizations and engage with supply chain actors to design adequate adaptation scenarios. Donor: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters (GMCR) El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4  Catholic Relief Services  Climate Change, Crops, Policy & Institutions  Peter Laderach   
1462 Regional program supporting afro-descendent rural populations in Latin America Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-01-18  2012-03-31  This program aims to strengthen the institutionality of the Afro Cultural Assets (ACUA) Foundation so that it can establish partnerships to reinforce support provided for the development of poor rural populations of African descent in South and Central America. Donor: International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Andrew Jarvis  Jhon Jairo Hurtado, Nora Castañeda 
1461 Study and dissemination of lessons learnt on public policies fostering inclusive value chains in Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-10-01  2012-09-30  The objective of this project is to gain greater understanding of the policies and incentives in place in one of the more advanced countries in Latin America. This includes investigating the level of public support for supply chains, identifying what works and what does not work both for increasing the competitiveness of rural economies and for poverty reduction, and sharing those lessons with a wide range of public policy decision-makers all with the aim of contributing to a more informed debate about the utility and limitations of public investments and incentives in this area. To achieve this objective, the proposal will focus on Colombia as a case study. Donor: Ford Foundation Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Mark Lundy   
1459 Implementation of the land and water management component of the project “Promotion of food security in the Choluteca and Black River watersheds (PROSADE)” Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-10-01  2012-03-31  This project aims to provide technical assistance and training to the technical team working in the sustainable management of soil and water component of the PROSADE project. Emphasis is placed on: The innovation of agricultural production systems for food security for the benefit of participants of the project. Productive diversication strategies oriented towards markets, facilitation with business and organization building for rural businesses and organizations, and support in marketing strategies. Soil quality and fertility analysis. Economic analysis. Capacity building regarding all themes of CIAT’s work. Donor: Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Honduras  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4  CARE  Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions, Soils, Water Management  María Eugenia Baltodano   
1458 Agriculture for basic necessities A4N Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-03-01  2011-11-01  This project aims to strengthen the rural enterprise development capacities of the technical teams of CRS and partners, in order to contribute to the income growth of the families and groups of the A4N project. Donor: Catholic Relief Services Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Mark Lundy   
1456 Integrated Molecular Breeding Platform (MBP) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-07-01  2012-06-30  This project intends to develop and deploy a sustainable Molecular Breeding Platform as a one-stop shop for information, analytical tools, and related services in order to design, conduct, and analyze molecular-assisted breeding experiments. Donor: Generation Challenge Program Belgium, Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Agrobiodiversity  Glenn Hyman   
1454 Assessing and anticipating the consequences of introducing benefit sharing mechanisms Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-01-01  2013-11-30  Through this project, basin stakeholders will have new opportunities to care for and reap the advantages of their local water and soil resources, leading to improvements in their livelihoods. It is intended that conflict between water and land users will have been diminished through the development and implementation of fair and equitable water and land reallocation mechanisms and rights, which will ultimately contribute to improving the livelihoods of stakeholders. Local and regional governance will also benefit from this project because resources and efforts can be redirected to other urgent problems. Social organization will become more inclusive and focused to deal with peoples’ demands in closer contact with policy-makers at local scales. Finally, downstream water users will have a more abundant and reliable supply of clean water while upstream communities will benefit from investments that improve the productivity of their agroecosystems. In return, upstream communities will agree to cease the unsustainable exploitation of catchment areas key to downstream water supply. Donor: CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food Colombia, Ecuador, Peru  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4  University of Florida, Gainesville, USA  Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Water Management  Marcela Quintero   
1453 Identification and validation of successful organic production systems with the potential for adoption in the Southern Cone Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-10-01  2011-09-30  The objective of this project is to identify, systematize, and validate production processes of successful organic vegetable and fruit systems that have market potential. Specific activities include: Technically characterize two successful organic production systems with economic potential for each participating country. Identify and recommend critical points and success factors of  organic production and management technologies. Develop proposals for economically viable technologies for the production of agricultural goods for the organic market. Disseminate proposals tending to the incorporation of new areas of organic production. Donor: Institute of Agricultural Research (INIA) Chile ___________________________ Spanish Version: Identificación y validación de sistemas productivos orgánicos exitosos con potencial de adopción en la agricultura familiar en países del Cono Sur. Identificar, sistematizar y validar procesos productivos hortícolas y frutícolas orgánicos exitosos y que tengan potencial de mercado. Objetivos ESPECÍFICOS: Caracterizar técnicamente dos sistemas productivos orgánicao exitosos en rubros agrícolas con potencial económico por cada país participante. Identificar puntos críticos y factores de éxito de las tecnologías de producción orgánica y gestión, más recomendable. Elaborar propuestas tecnologías económicamente viables para la producción de bienes agrícolas orientados a mercados de productos orgánicos. Difundir las propuestas desarrolladas propendiendo la incorporación de nueva superficie a la producción orgánica. Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Crops, Market Access  Andrew Jarvis   
1452 Site-specific agriculture based on farmers’ experiences (SSAFE) for fruit producers in Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-06-01  2013-06-30  The main objective of this project is to increase the competitiveness of fruit producers in Colombia through a system of site-specific agriculture based on shared experiences (SSAFE) between producers of citrus, avocado, mango, and banana. The system is designed so that it continues over the long-term and contributes to improved decision-making on the selection and management of fruit trees by farmers around the country. Research on the four production chains will serve as a basis to expand the system later to cover other species of fruit trees.   Donor: Fondo Nacional de Fomento Hortofrutícola (FNFH) Association of Fruit and Vegetable Growers in Colombia (ASOHOFRUCOL) Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Crops  Andrew Jarvis  Daniel Jimenez, James Cock, Luis Armando Muñoz 
1449 Raising smallholder farmer income in the developing world: New business models for sustainable trading relationships Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-01  2011-11-30  Objectives of this project are as follows: 1) To develop a set of business models that support sustainable smallholder and rural laborer inclusion in high-value, formal export, and domestic markets in four distinct product clusters. 2) To apply these new business models (through value chain analysis and upgrading) in sub-Saharan Africa. 3) To expand these validated business models through existing and new supply chain partnerships that provide direct benefits to 158,000 smallholders and 301,000 laborers while using project results to influence existing standards. CIAT specifically helped to establish a fine flavor cocoa supply chain in Ghana, which will help to increase income and improve smallholders’ livelihoods. Donor: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (through the Rainforest Alliance) Ghana  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4  Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG), Ghana  Market Access  Mark Lundy  Peter Laderach 
1448 Alliance for the creation of rural development opportunities through Agroenterprise relations (ACORDAR) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-10-01  2012-09-30  This project aims to support 5,400 families in 44 poor rural municipalities of Nicaragua to increase revenue, secure permanent employment and strengthen commercial know-how in partnership with municipal governments and the private sector. CRS and a consortium of principle members, implementing partners, and organizations of the public and private sector will work to address problems related to: poor economies of scale inadequate productive and post-harvest infrastructure inadequate technologies lack of access to market intelligence, and weak organizational structures of cooperatives. This will be achieved through the establishment and strengthening of 85 worker-based cooperatives and six second-level cooperative societies, and the development of production and value chains. Donor: Catholic Relief Services Nicaragua  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC4    Market Access  Mark Lundy  Jhon Jairo Hurtado 
1447 Agroforestry Guidelines for National Policy and Decision Makers – Sustainable Forest Management in a Changing Climate World Agroforestry Centre  2011-05-12  2012-01-31  The purpose of this project is to contribute to the collection of information at national and international level and participate in the formulation and peer review of agroforestry guidelines for National Policy and Decision Makers with special attention to Africa and Asia. Specific activities to be undertaken are as follows: 1. Collect and analyse "information on Agroforestry Policy and Decision Making" in general for Africa and Asia, specifically in Brazil, Cameroon, China, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Malawi, Niger, Philippines, Tanzania and Zambia 2.Carry out and report on "Intervoes" among at least 10 policy and decsion making specialists related to agroforestry in India, Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Peru and Zambia 3. Carry out at least 4 "National Case Studies" in India, Indonesia, Kenya and Malawi and if possible, China and Brazil too 4. Provide advice to FAO for the 2 National Case Studies in Tanzania and Zambia 5. "Peer review the draft guidelines" to be formulated by the international consultant in line with the peer review process 6. Produce 2 policy briefs on the case studies realized to be distributed by ICRAF and FAO through existing research and development newsletters, journals and networks 7. Participate in the Institutional collaborative task force through virtual communications, when needed and when requested by FAO Brazil, Cameroon, China, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Malawi, Niger, Philippines, Tanzania, Zambia      Policy & Institutions  Frank Place   
1445 “Approaches for Analysing Multi-functionality of Agroforestry Systems in Western Kenya in Relation to Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation” and “Multifunctionality of Agroforestry Systems” World Agroforestry Centre  2011-05-19  2014-07-31  In these two projects, ICRAF will: 1. Carry out collaborative research including modelling tools at different scale 2. Carry out collaborative research including field research 3. Carry out training workshop on Polyscape including scientists, students, stakeholders 4. Co-supervision of PhD student 5. Supervision of co-supervision of students 6. Supervision of co-supervision of SCC Vi-Agroforestry staff that have time allocated for defined capacity building and research tasks 7. Participate in training workshops 8. Participate in exchange of scientists and students 9. Contribute to scientific publications in peer-review journals Kenya    Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences   Forestry & Agroforestry, Soils, Water Management  Fergus Sinclair  Adrian Radcliffe 
1443 Research on Village-Scale Pyrolsis for Liquid Biofuels in Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2011-03-01  2015-02-28  The general objectives of this project are to: 1. Quantify the economic potential of biomass resources to profuce biochar and biofuel via pyrolysis in Western Kenya 2. Evaluate and identify markets for fuel and biochar as well as ownership and management options for pyrolysis processing 3. Assess adoption and growth in biomass, biochar and biofuel production 4. Coordinate field work of all project partners in Kenya and provide infrastructure to successfully implement the collaborative project Kenya      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Market Access, Soils  Frank Place   
1441 Interim Secretariat of Nairobi Science and Policy Forum on Sustainability of Agroecosystems World Agroforestry Centre  2011-04-20  2012-04-19  This forum will focus on optimizing production, specifically on low carbon/greener agriculture, integrated with natural resources management and livestock where smallholder systems will be targeted. In this project, ICRAF will undertake the following activities: 1. Support the secretarial services of the Forum 2. Hire a consultant for the drafting of policy briefs and policy recommendations 3. Organization of seminars Project outputs are as follows: 1. Policy recommendations and policy briefs 2. Seminar reports 3. Increased awareness on how to achieve competitiveness, profitability and sustainability of smallholder agriculture in East Africa Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Agrobiodiversity, Livestock, Policy & Institutions  August Temu   
1440 Enhancing Total Farm Productivity in Smallholder Conservation Agriculture Based Systems in Eastern Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2011-01-01  2012-12-31  The goal of this project is to increase the food security and incomes of resource-poor smallholder farmers in eastern Africa through diversified cropping patterns that provide sufficient food and feed from more resilient and sustainable farming systems. Project objectives are: (a) Understand the interactions between crops and livestock in target farming communities and identify opportunities to overcome the constraints to farm productivity in maize-based mixed crop-livestock farming systems in eastern Africa; (b) Develop and demonstrate efficient, lower risk and more productive farming systems based on the principles of conservation agriculture (CA) that combine increased grain production and the production of sufficient animal feed with improved quality; (e) Explore, evaluate and demonstrate options for the incorporation of trees and shrubs into smallholder CA-based systems through participatory research in target communities; (d) Evaluate the benefits of more intensive and diverse farming systems based on the principles of CA on farm family food security, income and livelihoods, and on labour requirements, disaggregated by gender and wealth groups; (e) Disseminate and scale out Subproject II results to farmers, extension agents and researchers through targeted activities and publications; and (f) Maintain Subproject 11 Subproject 11 titled “Enhancing total farm productivity in smallholder conservation agriculture based systems in eastern Africa” efficiency and dynamism through capacity building and constant monitoring, evaluation, and reorientation of Subproject 11 activities and outputs. Ethiopia, Kenya      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Livestock, Policy & Institutions  Jeremias Mowo   
1438 SASHA: Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2010-01-01  2013-12-31  The objective of this agreement is to complement the Kenya/Rwanda Animal feed poCP component under the SASHA project with the support of the East Afrian Dairy Development (EADD) Project Staff in Kenya and Rwanda. Project outputs are as follows: 1. Report on the baseline survey findings 2. Annual report on vine retention by farmers and quality of material 3. Evaluation report on the overall efficiency of the two value chains (factory vs. farmer organization based) 4. Evaluation report on the income and equity benefits to farmers from participating in both chains (compared to controlled group) Kenya, Rwanda      Agrobiodiversity, Livestock, Market Access  Josephine Kirui  Josephine Kirui 
1436 Fostering Knowledge Sharing for Integrated Natural Resource Management in Agricultural Landscapes of Southern Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2011-01-01  2011-12-31  The objective of this project is capacity building of Mozambique agricultural professionals in the utilization of a participatory methodology to mobilize and integrate local and scientific knowledge on indicators of soil fertility. It further aims at at developing an innovative participatory methodology to identify soil quality indicators that are linked to soil-based ecosystem services in small scale farming systems in Mozambique. The project aims to train staff from government agencies (Agricultural research and Rural Extension), but also include selected staff from other relevant local institutions through the conduction in participatory workshops in Mozambique. Further, this project  will develop a network between Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa), ICRAF and agricultural professionals from Mozambique for long-term collaborative research. Mozambique      Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Soils  Edmundo Barrios   
1435 Management of Environmental Services and Financing for Sustainable Development World Agroforestry Centre  2011-03-23  2011-12-31  This project aims to bring to the attention of African governments, the private sectors and other regional and national stake-holders the urgent need to find sustainable ways to restore and manage natural ecosystems while also establishing enabling conditions for countries to access environmental finance from emerging carbon/environmental finance markets. Drawing on emerging lessons from initiatives currently underway both within and outside of UNDP, the project will: i) Build on and expand ongoing efforts of helping African governments and institutions to effectively participate in the international climate negotiations in particular, enhancing their understanding of the crucial Ball Road Map discussions, currently underway and their economic and policy implications within the context of the Convention, ii) Act as vehicle to create awareness among regional and national partners of the development benefits of and the interface between sustainable development and Payments for Ecosystem Services and Clean Development Mechanism, and iii) Contribute to efforts aimed at establishing enabling institutional, legal and regulatory frameworks required for accessing environmental and related carbon finance, needed to sustainably restore and manage natural resources. Equatorial Guinea, Kenya      Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions  Peter Minang   
1432 Agricultural Training for Iraqis International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-06-01  2013-06-30  In an effort to support human capacity development in the agricultural sector of Iraq, a set of training programs for research scientists and technical  managers from the national agricultural research system in Iraq will take place along the following thematic areas: 1 Water Management for Improved water Use Efficiency in the dry Areas (4 weeks) 2-Individual on the -job training on Biotechnology Application in Crop Improvement  (16weeks)3-Integrate crop and livestock production(3 weeks)4-Indifidual on the job training on Integrate crop and livestock production(16 weeks). Iraq  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7    Climate Change, Crops, Land Management, Soils, Water Management  Kamel Shideed  Kamel Shideed 
1430 Cross-cutting M&E Functions and Knowledge Management for INRM within the MENARID Programme Framework International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-05-18  2014-12-31  The Project's goal is to establish an integrated knowledge-base approach through crosscutting M&E functions and knowledge management (KM) for integrated natural resource management (INRM) within the MENARID programme framework. (a) generate tools for systematic cross-cutting and aligned M&E actions throughout the MENARID framework; and (b) develop a user-friendly knowledge management platform, information dissemination, harmonization and dissemination mechanisms of INRM best practices throughout the MENARID portfolio linked to existing networks. Afghanistan, Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Turkey, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8  NARS  Policy & Institutions  Aden Aw-Hassan  Aden Aw-Hassan 
1427 Focused Identification of Germplasm for Specific Traits International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-07-01  2012-06-30  As plant breeders are challenged to produce new varieties that can deal with the complex impact of climate change and other emerging production constraints they will be increasingly forced to look within genetic resource collections for novel genes. The problem then becomes; how do they rationally choose a subset of germplasm to screen from' genetic resource collections that contain millions of accessions; given that it is not economically or logistically feasible to screen them all for a specific suite of traits. GRDC has previously funded a project (ICA00003)aimed at developing methodologies to identify small best-bet subsets of germplasm from global plant genetic resource collections that will maximize the chances of finding the desired traits in a manageable set of genotypes. The resulting approach has been coined the Focused Identification of Germplasm Strategy (FIGS) FIGS use agro-climatic information, generated by Geographic Information Systems, as well as other types of information, to describe the environments from which genetic resources were originally collected. This allows us to predict where selection pressures may have occurred for specific adaptive traits. This in turn gives us a rational basis upon which to select tailor made best-bet subsets of germ plasm from genetic resource collections to screen for useful traits, thereby greatly enhancing the efficiency and timeline associated with gene discovery. FIGS have proved successful at identifying bread wheat landraces tolerant to abiotic stresses and containing new genes for tolerances to both insect pests and diseases  As plant breeders are challenged to produce new varieties that can deal with the complex impact of climate change and other emerging production constraints they will be increasingly forced to look within genetic resource collections for novel genes. The problem then becomes; how do they rationally choose a subset of germplasm to screen from' genetic resource collections that contain millions of accessions; given that it is not economically or logistically feasible to screen them all for a specific suite of traits. GRDC has previously funded a project (ICA00003)aimed at developing methodologies to identify small best-bet subsets of germplasm from global plant genetic resource collections that will maximize the chances of finding the desired traits in a manageable set of genotypes. The resulting approach has been coined the Focused Identification of Germplasm Strategy (FIGS) FIGS use agro-climatic information, generated by Geographic Information Systems, as well as other types of information, to describe the environments from which genetic resources were originally collected. This allows us to predict where selection pressures may have occurred for specific adaptive traits. This in turn gives us a rational basis upon which to select tailor made best-bet subsets of germ plasm from genetic resource collections to screen for useful traits, thereby greatly enhancing the efficiency and timeline associated with gene discovery. FIGS have proved successful at identifying bread wheat landraces tolerant to abiotic stresses and containing new genes for tolerances to both insect pests and diseases  Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Seed Systems  Kenneth Street  Kenneth Street 
1426 Conservation Agriculture in Africa: Analysing and Foreseeing its impact – Comprehending its Adoption (CA2AFRICA). International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-01-01  2012-06-30  Conservation Agriculture (CA) is increasingly seen as a promising alternative for coping with the need to increase food production on the basis of more sustainable farming practices. CA specifically aims to address the problems of soil degradation resulting from agricultural practices that deplete the organic matter and nutrient content of the soil. It aims at higher crop yields and lower production costs. Inspired by the efficacy of combating erosion and reversing crop yield decline in the United States of America and Brazil in the 1970s, a growing number of research and extension programs in Africa, supported by major international initiatives (e.g. FAO, GTZ, the DMC- direct sowing mulch-based systems initiative under GFAR, ECAF, CIMMYT, AFD) have increasingly promoted the principles of CA. Yet, success with adopting CA on farms in Africa has been limited. This project seeks to better understand the reasons for the limited adoption of CA in Africa. A better understanding of the extent and in which techno-institutional conditions CA strengthens the socio-economic position of landholders, is a pre-requisite to know where and how to promote large-scale CA adoption. The goal is, therefore, to examine the agro-ecological, socioeconomic and institutional conditions that determine success or failure of CA. This knowledge will contribute significantly to successful (re)design of CA practices to better adapt them to African farming systems and their context. The project brings together the major research players involved with CA in Africa to share, assess and learn together with practitioners from past and ongoing experiences on CA in five regions across the continent. With the five regions the project covers the major agro-ecological zones and farming systems of Africa. It will draw on a number of selected case studies from these regions to identify lessons and priorities for future research, practice and policy on CA in Africa. The integrated assessment of these case studies will be done mostly through the use of carefully selected bio-physical, socio-economic and innovation systems models. A main outcome of the project will be a better understanding by stakeholders involved in CA research and development across Africa of the impact and adoption of CA. With such understanding, formal research and development actors in Africa and their international partners will be in a better position to target CA technologies to the diverse African farming systems. This is one of the necessary conditions to have a profound impact on rural livelihoods. Morocco, Tunisia  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6  Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), Eastern African Grain Council (EAGC),Kenya, INERA, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)  Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Policy & Institutions, Soils  Mohammed Mourid  Mohammed Mourid 
1424 Dairy Goat Component of the Rural Microfinance and Livestock Support Programme. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-01-01  2012-12-31  To provide poor women heads of households with the skills. knowledge and initial inputs they require in order to engage in small-scale dairy goat productron in the selected districts of Nangarhar and Baghlan Provinces Afghanistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6  Ministry of Agriculture  Livestock  Javed Rizvi  Barbara Ann Rischkowsky 
1423 Programme for the development and dissemination of sustainable irrigation management in olive growing. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-12-22  2013-09-30  The main objective of the project is to enhance and stabilise crop yields of small scale olive farmers in two Mediterranean countries, Morocco and Syria, through the optimisation of water management practices, applied to olive cultivation. Improved and more stable olive yields will then turn into improved earnings and livelihood for the olive farmers targeted by the project. Olive quality will also increase due to a more efficient water management. The project objectives will be achieved through the demonstration and dissemination of sustainable irrigation technologies and efficient irrigation techniques applied to olive cultivation Morocco, Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7  National Agricultural Research Institute (NARI) PNG  Climate Change, Land Management, Water Management  Theib Oweis  Theib Oweis 
1419 Water and Livelihoods Initiative (WLI) Regional Implementation Funds. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-10-01  2011-09-30  The goal of the WLI is to improve the livelihoods of rural households and communities in areas where water scarcity, land degradation, water quality deterioration, food security and health problems are prevalent in the seven participating countries (Syria, Jordan, Palestine, Egypt, Yemen, Iraq, Lebanon), focusing initially on specific benchmark sites.  Water and land management strategies designed to increase water productivity will be initially pilot-tested at these benchmark sites and will then be scaled out to other areas within each country and throughout the region Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syrian Arab Republic, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), NARS, Texas A&M University, University of California-Davis, University of Florida, Gainesville, USA  Climate Change, Land Management, Water Management  Theib Oweis  Fadi Karam 
1411 Options for Coping with Increased Water Scarcity in Agriculture in West Asia and North Africa (CWANA Water Benchmarks Phase II) International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-01-01  2013-12-31  The CWANA Water Benchmarks Project is a community-based venture that involves farmers directly in the testing and implementing new options of water management in dry areas of WANA. It aims at developing modern technologies to improve water productivity so that those technologies are adopted and disseminated among the targeted groups, achieve optimum rain water/water resource use efficiency through supplemental irrigation and integrate water harvesting and water use efficiency in production systems in dry environments. It also aims at developing water productivity techniques and systems in rainfed and irrigated systems. Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7    Water Management  Theib Oweis  Feras Ziadat, Mohammed Karrou 
1399 Increased productivity, competitiveness and sustainability of systems of small and medium livestock producers in the Patía Basin and Popayán Plateau Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-10-01  2012-02-29  Under agreement with CIAT and led by the Universidad del Cauca, new forage technologies are being introduced and evaluated using a participatory approach working with small- and medium-sized livestock producers from northern Cauca, Colombia. The project aims to identify, assess and co-develop germplasm of forage species suitable for the conditions of Patía and Popayan, and also to evaluate the production and use of high-quality forages incorporated into farming systems. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1398 Increased productivity and reduced risk in pig production and market chains Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-09-01  2014-08-30  Pig raising continues to be an important livelihood activity in northern Laos based on traditional methods that are influenced increasingly by social and market pressures. This new project aims to enhance pig production, manage the impact of pig diseases, reduce the risk of zoonotic diseases, and overcome disease constraints on market access. The project responds specifically to: The importance of livestock in the Lao economy and to the livelihoods of village households, with   specific poverty, gender, and ethnicity implications. The limitations of the current village-based systems in terms of feeding regimes and reproductive management for locally bred pigs. The potential for village pig production to become a better financial contributor to community well-being. Increasing pressure to confine pigs for hygiene, forage delivery, and other management reasons. The constant threat of disease incursions, especially classical swine fever (CSF). The risk of zoonotic diseases for animals and humans. Laos    Murdoch University  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock, Market Access  Tassilo Tiemann   
1397 Improved feeding systems for more efficient beef cattle production in Cambodia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-03-01  2011-08-31  This project aims to reduce poverty of small farmers in Cambodia by increasing cattle productivity through improved feeding strategies and reduced labor (time) requirement for feeding cattle. The introduction of forage plants as crops (different grass species and Stylo 184) and the growing awareness among farmers that animals can be seen as a commodity rather than an asset, requiring appropriate management to return reasonable revenues, have been the most important achievements. Improving market access helps to maintain farmers’ interest and changes farmer attitudes as they start to see themselves as an interest group of organized producers. Increasing the availability of forage species through forage shops has played an important role in making forage-based technologies more available. Cambodia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock  Tassilo Tiemann   
1396 Improving the reliability of rain-fed, rice/livestock-based farming systems in North East Thailand Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-03-01  2011-06-30  The overall aim of the project is to improve the reliability of achieving profitable returns at the household level from rice and cattle production in rain-fed, rice-based farming ecosystems in Mahasarakham Province in Northeast Thailand. The integration of profitable forage-livestock systems in the existing mixed rice-focused systems is one of the principal aims of this World Vision-lead project. Thailand  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4  University of Queensland  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Ecosystem Management, Livestock  Tassilo Tiemann   
1395 Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increased use of fodder Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2006-10-01  2011-04-30  This advanced project is an “action research” initiative aimed at better understanding the factors and processes that influence the success of fodder innovations in rural areas of developing countries in which livestock are important components of the livelihood strategies of poor people. This understanding will be used to design effective ways to facilitate the access to and use of fodder technologies in pilot learning sites representative of large population domains in crop-livestock systems located in Ethiopia, Syria, and Vietnam. Ethiopia, Syrian Arab Republic, Vietnam  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock  Tassilo Tiemann   
1394 Brachiaria breeding Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-01-01  2011-12-31  The principal objective of the Brachiaria breeding program at CIAT is to develop and release superior apomictic genotypes as commercial cultivars that will achieve adoption by farmers in the tropics. To date, two cultivars have been released under the names of Mulato and Mulato II.  Mulato II has better spittlebug resistance than Mulato, is more drought tolerant, and has significantly greater seed yield. Colombia, Mexico  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  John Miles   
1392 Integration of leguminous cover crops in mixed-farming systems to improve soil fertility and animal production Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-09-01  2011-12-31  The project purpose is to foster integration of leguminous cover crops in smallholder mixed-farming systems to improve soil fertility and animal production, with emphasis on varietal experiments with Canavalia brasiliensis, seed production and the development of dissemination material. Nicaragua  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4  Laboratory for Human Nutrition, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zürich  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock, Soils  Rein van der Hoek   
1321 Commercial Products Project Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-12-01  2011-11-30  The Commercial Products project (COMPRO) seeks to evaluate and scale up new chemical and biological commercial products for improving and sustaining crop yields in selected agro-ecological zones in sub-Saharan Africa. Research Themes Baseline information and site selection To select sites, collect baseline information, characterize new products, and evaluate data obtained from trials conducted by the private companies. Screening of new products and technological options To screen a large number of new products on some key crops such as maize, soybean, cowpea and banana under greenhouse conditions, followed by a field evaluation of effective products and an investigation of their capacity to increase crop yield across target agro-ecozones, land intensification and soil fertility gradients, including fields that are responsive to fertilizer and those are not, as a basis for integrating these into Integrated Soil Fertility Management (ISFM) technologies. Understanding mechanisms and contributions To unravel mechanisms underlying adaptation and contributions of the two selected products and their combinations to crop performance and yield persistence in various target cropping systems across the target agro-ecozones, land intensification and soil fertility gradients. Making effective products available at scale To foster dissemination of effective new agricultural products beyond the experimental sites through a cycle of demonstration and farmer-managed adaptation trials in the target areas. This objective will initiate activities that could potentially be further developed in a Phase II proposal that Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF)  may fund at 1.5 – 2 years into the program for expanding commercial scale up, formulations, field development or field dissemination of technologies in different countries. This preliminary activity should be done in accordance with community extension programs associated with development. Project management, capacity building, and monitoring and evaluation To operationalize a continuous monitoring and evaluation framework as a basis for ensuring that the desired outputs are produced, and explore and develop pathways for commercialization of effective products. Several students (Master and PhD) will be trained in the field of biological materials, soil inoculants and soil microbiology. Currently, national research capacity is limited but crucial to achieve success. Gender issues will be taken into consideration in the selection of the students for both Master and PhD. This will be done closely in relation with the Project funded by BMGF and coordinated by the Gender & Diversity programme of CGIAR. Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, Nigeria    Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Farm Input Promotions Africa Ltd. (FIPS–Africa), International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Moi University  Crops, Soils  Didier Lesueur  Joyce Jefwa, Pieter Pypers 
1391 Dry season forages to improve the livelihoods of smallholders in eastern Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-02-01  2013-01-31  The project’s goal is to improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in eastern Africa, by providing greater availability of dry season forages to both female and male smallholder farmers with mixed crop-livestock systems in drought-prone areas of Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda. Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4  Consortium for Improving Agriculture-based Livelihoods in Central Africa (CIALCA), Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Rwanda (ISAR), Rwanda, National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)- Uganda  Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Livestock  Brigitte Maass   
1389 Developing improved farming and marketing systems in rainfed regions of southern Laos PDR Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-12-01  2013-11-30  The lowland and upland farming systems of rainfed southern Laos have been identified as having elevated risk of hunger and rising rural poverty. Increasing the supply of food and generating income from these systems is constrained by low fertility soils, weed competition, six months of dry season without appropriate water management systems, unpredictable weather conditions (including droughts and floods), market risks, increasing cost of labor and high competition from the neighboring countries, Thailand and Vietnam. Combining the expertise of an international team of researchers from a wide range of institutions, this project aims to tackle these constraints through a highly integrated approach consisting of five components: rice, livestock, hydrology, social economy and knowledge sharing. Laos  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4  International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), University of Queensland  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Land Management, Livestock, Soils, Water Management  Tassilo Tiemann   
1388 Eco-efficient crop and livestock production for poor farmers in the sub-humid hillside areas of Nicaragua Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-07-01  2013-06-30  This project aims to improve livelihoods of rural poor in sub-humid hillsides of Nicaragua by enhancing eco-efficiency in rural landscapes through the application of the Quesungual Slash and Mulch Agroforestry System (QSMAS) in combination with enhanced forage-based technologies as the basis of an integrated land use management strategy. Nicaragua    University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Land Management, Livestock  Idupulapati Rao   
1387 Identification of aluminum resistance genes in Brachiaria and phenotypic characterization of grass and legume germplasm for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-03-01  2011-02-28  A wide range of abiotic stress-adapted forage grass and legume options with higher forage nutritional quality and reduced potential for methane emission will be identified. The socioeconomic impact of improved forage grass and legume germplasm with adaptation to acid soils and climate change would be immense in terms of increased beef and milk production, more efficient use of purchased inputs, and improved integration into crop-livestock systems. In addition, the discovery of Al resistance genes from Brachiaria can open the possibility to improve Al resistance of major field crops. Improved forage options could play a key role in improving eco-efficiency of forage-based production systems. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4  EMBRAPA  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1386 Development of Brachiaria genotypes adapted to poor soil drainage to increase cattle production and adapt grazing systems to climate change in Latin America Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-10-01  2012-09-30  This project aims to develop genotypes of Brachiaria with higher tolerance to waterlogging and more productivity than the commercial cultivars for livestock systems in humid zones, which are suffering the uncharacteristic periods of waterlogging due to extreme weather events associated with climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean. We also aim to identify waterlogging tolerant Brachiaria genotypes using the farmer participatory research approach. Colombia, Nicaragua, Panama  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Livestock  Idupulapati Rao   
1384 More chicken and pork in the pot, and money in the pocket: Improving forages for monogastric animals with low-income farmers Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-03-01  2012-02-29  This project aims to foster on-farm production of forage-based protein feeds for improved smallholder monogastric livestock production, across a range of socioeconomic contexts, with the aim to enhance family nutrition and income generation in the rural areas of Colombia, Nicaragua and DR Congo. Colombia, Congo Dem. Rep., Nicaragua  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO4  Consortium for Improving Agriculture-based Livelihoods in Central Africa (CIALCA), University of Hohenheim, Germany  Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Livestock  Michael Peters   
1382 Development of a global strategy for the ex situ conservation of Phaseolus beans Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-10-01  2011-12-31  This project aims to develop – in close consultation with representatives of the relevant networks, institutions and stakeholders – strategies for the efficient and effective conservation of bean genetic resources. CIAT will identify priority collections eligible for long-term support from the Global Crop Diversity Trust and promote their urgent upgrading and the need for any necessary training. The strategy will promote the rationalization of conservation efforts at regional and global levels, e.g. through encouraging partnerships and sharing facilities and tasks, and will link with the relevant regional conservation strategies. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO1, 2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Daniel Debouck  Luigi Guarino 
1381 The Long-Term conservation and sustainable utilization of the ex situ collection of Cassava germplasm held by CIAT Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-01  2012-12-31  The Global Crop Diversity Trust, in cooperation with CIAT, is supporting the development of long-term strategies for the conservation of cassava germplasm to guide the allocation of resources to the most important and needy crop diversity collections. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO1, 2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Daniel Debouck  Charlotte Lusty 
1380 Facilitating Access to Data on the International in-trust Collections of Bean held at CIAT Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-02-01  2011-12-31  The activities of this project include the identification and loading of phenotypic data into the prototype global portal, GENESYS, for material accessioned in the bean collection held by the CIAT genebank. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO1, 2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Daniel Debouck  Jane Toll 
1378 The long-term conservation and sustainable utilization of the ex situ collection of bean germplasm held by CIAT Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-01  2012-12-31  The Global Crop Diversity Trust, in cooperation with CIAT, is supporting the development of long-term strategies for the conservation of bean germplasm to guide the allocation of resources to the most important and needy crop diversity collections. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO1, 2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Daniel Debouck  Luigi Guarino 
1376 Evaluation of natural waxes as a new alternative for the conservation of fresh cassava roots Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-01-01  2010-12-31  To assist the consolidation of new domestic and export markets for cassava cultivation in Colombia, technical and economic assessments are being conducted on the use of natural wax as an alternative technology for the conservation of cassava roots. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Bernardo Ospina   
1374 Single cell protein production and animal supplements out of wastes and effluents from the sugar cane agro-industry Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-01  2011-12-31  We are developing, evaluating, and validating the technical, economic, and environmental technological processes necessary for the preparation of two nutritional supplements to market in the animal feed sector in Colombia, made out of byproducts of the sugar cane industry. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3    Crops, Livestock  Bernardo Ospina   
1373 Harnessing water-use efficient bio-energy crops for enhancing livelihood opportunities of smallholder farmers Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-04-01  2010-12-31  This project involves a wide range of activities working for the improvement of varieties, production systems, and waste management, in order to improve smallholder livelihoods in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Some activities include the development of high-biomass cassava, the fine-tuning of production packages, and the facilitation of the development of mechanisms to allow effective production of biofuels from agroindustrial waste. Brazil, Colombia, Ghana, Nigeria  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3  International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Hernan Ceballos   
1372 Screening for the industrial applications of amylose-free cassava starch Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-09-01  2013-12-31  Parallel to the development of cassava cultivars with waxy starch, additional work is currently ongoing to further understand the potential industrial applications of waxy starch. National Starch is a leading private company specialized in the production of native starches and their modifications for different uses by many different processes. This 5-year project started in 2009 and involves the production of waxy starch in Colombia and subsequently its analysis in Colombia (CIAT) and New Jersey (USA). Colombia, United States of America  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Hernan Ceballos   
1370 Collaboration with Embrapa–CNPMF in cassava research Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-01-01  2011-12-31  For many years CIAT and EMBRAPA (particularly at the Mandioca and Fruticultura Center in Cruz das Almas, Bahia) have collaborated productively. CIAT and EMBRAPA have access to most of the genetic variability of cassava and related species. Currently both institutions share resources from projects financed by AgroSalud (through CLAYUCA) and the Generation Challenge Programme (GCP). The former is to develop enhanced diets and the latter aims at screening for new sources of tolerance to biotic and abiotic (particularly drought) stresses in cassava's wild relatives. Embrapa has invested in cassava research at CIAT to foster the collaboration of both institutions, facilitating training of personnel and visits of emeritus cassava entomologist from CIAT to different regions of Brazil. Brazil, Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3  EMBRAPA  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Hernan Ceballos   
1368 Development of commercial cultivars with waxy-starch roots Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-01  2012-12-31  This is a 5-year project which aims to develop commercial cassava cultivars carrying the high-value trait of amylose-free (waxy) starch. The origin of this project was the discovery of a spontaneous mutation discovered in 2006 and reported in 2007. A key partner in this project is the Kasetsart University of Thailand.  Highlighting the relevance of this discovery a similar project is likely to be developed for Brazil, and private starch companies such as National Starch and Corn Products Andina have expressed interest and provided resources as well. Colombia, Thailand  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Hernan Ceballos  Nelson Morante 
1367 Double haploid breeding for cassava enhancement Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-03-01  2013-04-30  Inbreeding is important for cassava genetic enhancement. Therefore we are developing genetic stocks of partially inbred sources of agronomically desirable characteristics including: tolerance/resistance to PPD, CMD, CBSD, mites, whiteflies, thrips, CBB, SED, root rots, and special plant and root quality traits. However, the main outcome of this initiative is the development of a protocol for the production of doubled-haploids from cassava microspores (or ovules) as well as training materials and capacity building programs. China, Colombia, Nigeria, Uganda  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3  International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Hernan Ceballos  Beata Dedicova 
1366 Improving livelihoods of smallholder upland farmers through improved and integrated cassava-based cropping and livestock systems Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-04-01  2014-03-31  This project aims to develop, together with farmers, technologies that will increase the income and improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers living in the uplands of south-east Asia. This will be achieved by disseminating the selected technologies for improved cassava livestock production systems to many farmers, supporting national institutions in conducting strategic and applied research and developing procedures for monitoring the impact of new technologies on farmers' livelihoods and the environment. Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3    Crops, Livestock  Tin Maung Aye   
1364 Improving nutritional quality of cassava roots to improve the livelihoods of a million farmers in marginal agricultural land Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-01-01  2011-12-31  This project focuses mainly in developing high-carotene cultivars which will ultimately contribute to alleviating the chronic deficiency of vitamin A in many regions of the world. Because of the relevance of vitamin A deficiency in Africa, the efforts target that region of the world. The project has allowed for a very productive interaction and collaboration with our sister institution International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) based in Nigeria. CIAT is taking advantage of the large genetic variability available to its breeding cassava project to generate high-carotene germplasm. The project has also allowed close and productive interaction with EMBRAPA-CNPMF in Brazil. Congo Dem. Rep., Nigeria  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3  EMBRAPA, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Hernan Ceballos   
1362 Establishment of the first Colombian collection of Burkholderia glumae, causal agent of panicle blight of rice Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-01-01  2011-12-31  The presence of Burkholderia glumae has been reported in Colombia since 1989 as a causal agent of rice grain discoloration. As part of our activities, we are giving support to national institutions for the diagnosis of this pathogen in areas where its presence has not yet been confirmed. Due to the increased disease pressure in the last 2 years, an analysis of germplasm to identify tolerance needs to be conducted. Responses of the host against this pathogen under greenhouse conditions will give light to potential rice cultivars hosting tolerance genes that should be included in breeding programs as a disease control measure. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Gloria Mosquera   
1361 Novel strategies to enhance nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in rice Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-01-01  2013-12-31  Nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that generates nitrate through microbial activity, can lead to losses of fertilizer nitrogen by leaching and denitrification. In addition, nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming, is a by-product of denitrification. Certain plants can suppress soil nitrification by releasing inhibitors in root exudates, a phenomenon termed biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). The main objective of this BNI research is to identify contrasting rice genotypes and then to dissect genetic components (genes) associated with BNI. Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Saint-Martin (French part), St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops, Soils  Manabu Ishitani  Jagadish Rane 
1359 BREAD: Hybrid technologies for heterosis in rice and related cereals Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2000-01-01  2013-12-31  Most plants, including rice and several major cereal crops, have perfect flowers with both pistils and stamens. Maize, however, is monoecious, separating flowers with just pistils or stamens into different inflorescences. This floral partitioning promotes outcrossing and makes efficient hybrid seed production possible. An effort is ongoing to extend novel hybrid technologies to rice using a variety of genetic and molecular approaches. Colombia, United States of America  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Cesar P. Martinez   
1357 Activities in hybrid rice Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-01-01  2015-12-31  Hybrid rice, an emerging rice technology, could be the key to food security in the near future with the use of modern technologies in commercial production. CIAT and FLAR began the project this year with two objectives: Explore tropical japonica germplasm searching for maintainers using test crosses. Produce pure seed of rice AB systems from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI).  Preliminary results are very promising and several interesting hybrid combinations have been identified. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Edgar A. Torres   
1355 Introgression of traits of agronomic importance for the development of improved germplasm in Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-01-01  2010-12-31  This project sees the development of new rice germplasm which incorporates agronomic characteristics of interest present in exotic materials (Colombian landraces, North American varieties, and lines derived from wild species) into the genetic backgrounds of elite lines. Germplasm development is done using different breeding strategies such as recurrent selection, limited backcrossing, and anther culture. For generational advance of the elite varieties we are using different methodologies such as anther culture, field evaluation and selection in contrasting locations and methods of pedigree and recurrent selection. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Cesar P. Martinez  Edgar A. Torres 
1353 Marker-assisted selection for tolerance to cold temperatures Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-07-01  2012-06-30  The damage caused by cold fronts from the south of the Americas during the summer, is a major limitation to the healthy development of 1.3 million hectares of rice grown in southern Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina. Climate change studies indicate that over time this factor will become more variable, unpredictable, and extreme. The development of varieties tolerant to cold in their vegetative and reproductive stages contribute to rice’s adaptation to climate change in the Southern Cone of Latin America, ensuring regional and international food supply. Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Crops  Gonzalo Zorilla   
1351 Marker-assisted selection for resistance to the rice Hoja Blanca virus and Tagosodes oryzicolus Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-01-01  2010-12-31  A regionally focused project, we aim to develop a system for marker-assisted selection for resistance to the hoja blanca virus and the insect vector Tagosodes. A backcross method is being used to transfer QTLs associated with resistance to the rice hoja blanca virus to susceptible elite lines. Product lines will be ready for field testing in 2011. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Mathias Lorieux   
1349 Management of the mite-bacterium-fungus complex in Central America Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2006-01-01  2011-12-31  We are developing technologies for the control of the new complex mite-fungus-bacteria, which has recently been found in Central America and Colombia, caused primarily by Steneotarsonemus spinki-Sarocladium oryzae. In turn, this indirectly contributes to sustainable rice production by increasing yields and grain quality, reducing costs, slowing environmental degradation caused by excessive use of pesticides, which ultimately promotes profitability and competitiveness of the crop. Colombia, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Gloria Mosquera  Gustavo Prado 
1348 Promotion of research that targets the stable supply of global food Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-01-01  2011-12-31  Improved screening protocols for drought tolerance under screenhouse and confined field conditions are being developed. Permission from the Colombian National Biosafety Committee has given CIAT an excellent opportunity to evaluate gene technology under confined conditions. Our goal is to evaluate transgenic technology in upland rice, and to select superior lines under both normal and drought conditions. A Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) manual was also prepared and put into practice. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Manabu Ishitani   
1346 iBridges that give full access to the African rice allele pool Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-01-01  2009-12-31  By allowing breeders access to the complete genetic diversity available in the Oryza glaberrima species, we aim to: Deliver 60 sets of five to eight fertile interspecific lines derived from crosses between two O. sativa elite lines and 30 O. glaberrima accessions. Establish a high-throughput methodology based on SSR and SFP markers for rapid genome scanning of the introgressions. Fine map the chromosome 6 S locus, the major gene acting in the interspecific sterility barrier system, to derive a BC1 population from a cross between an O. sativa and an interspecific CSSL. Benin, Burkina Faso, Colombia, France, Mali, Philippines, United States of America  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1  IRD  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Mathias Lorieux   
1344 Phenotypic analysis of large collections of T-DNA rice lines Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2003-01-02  2010-12-31  Genoplante constructed a rice T-DNA insertional mutagenesis collection which was brought to CIAT for a systematical phenotypic evaluation of the mutant collection and the development of a database, as well as seed multiplication of the entire collection for distribution to interested laboratories. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1  Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), IRD  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Mathias Lorieux   
1342 Exploring natural variation in rice Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2005-01-01  2010-12-31  The future of crop improvement depends on the availability of genetic variation. There is a larger pool of genetic variation available in landraces and wild relatives of crops. To take advantage of the unexploited reservoir that exists in these wild relatives of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), we have developed interspecific introgression lines that will be of immediate use to breeders and will simultaneously serve to enhance our understanding of the “wild alleles” that contribute favorably to plant performance under drought stress. These lines are called Introgression Lines or Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines (CSSLs). Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1  AfricaRice, EMBRAPA  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Mathias Lorieux   
1340 High iron and zinc rice lines Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2005-01-01  2010-12-31  A fast-track approach was used to screen breeding lines and traditional/improved rice varieties to find rice germplasm with higher iron and zinc content in milled rice, using a breeding strategy in two phases. On a fast track, landraces and breeding lines were screened for mineral content to identify products that could have immediate utility, as potential varieties or donors. For a second phase, a crossing program was started to combine high-iron and zinc with high yield potential, tolerance to main biotic and abiotic stresses, and good grain quality. Two varieties have already been released in Bolivia, Cuba, and Panama. Some others will be released in Brazil, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, and Colombia in 2011. Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Panama  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1  EMBRAPA  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Cesar P. Martinez  Jaime Borrero 
1337 In vitro and greenhouse propagation of seven varieties of Japanese strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-02-01  2010-07-31  This project involves establishing relations between CIAT and Primavera Colombia Ltda., a private company that imports strawberry plant materials. Technical cooperation will be developed in order to carry out testing on seven different strawberry varieties, with the ultimate aim of improving strawberry quality and production in Colombia. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Alonso Gonzalez   
1336 Agreement on technical and scientific cooperation to combine efforts, resources and technology in order to fulfill commitments to strengthen clean agriculture in Colombia (CIAT-MADR Agreement 006/2009) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-01-01  2009-12-31  In collaboration with the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MADR), we aim to inform farmers and the general Colombian public about pesticides, their responsible use and how they affect consumers. Activities include training farmers, running public education campaigns, and establishing regulations to ensure their safer management. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2    Agrobiodiversity, Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions  Elizabeth Alvarez   
1335 Collection, characterization and clonal multiplication of selections of creole avocado with emphasis on the identification of Phytophthora spp. tolerant rootstocks Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2006-06-01  2009-07-31  This project involves the nationwide collection of local varieties of avocado seeds and plant material to identify potential resistance to Phytophthora, promising applications of the species for agribusiness and fresh consumption and important commercial species that perform well due to their vigor, productivity and disease resistance. The most promising materials will be added to the germplasm bank of avocado and related species in the Colombian Corporation of Agricultural Research (Corpoica). Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Elizabeth Alvarez   
1333 Standardization of coconut propagation techniques and the search of resistant germplasm to combat coconut diseases in Colombia: Phase I Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-07-01  2010-03-31  Coconut is a perennial crop, socially profitable and represents the source of income for more than 15 million families around the world. Through the establishment of clean and effective micro-propagation techniques and the evaluation of biotic stresses, we can ensure that coconut farmers are better equipped to deal with the plant health and breeding issues surrounding coconut cultivation. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Alonso Gonzalez   
1331 Strengthening peach palm production chains in Buenaventura, Colombia Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-04-01  2010-01-31  We look at various aspects of the peach palm (chontaduro) production chain to analyse where systems and processes can be made more sustainable, efficient and enterprising. Objectives include establishing safe fruit picking practices, optimizing cooking processes, strengthening industry associations, and developing participatory management systems. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Market Access  Alonso Gonzalez   
1330 Improving the health and competitiveness of plantain crops by developing new strategies for soil management and nutrition Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-09-01  2011-12-31  This project involves the careful selection and evaluation of effective soil management techniques, to control roundworms and Ralstonia solanacearum in plantain cultivation. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2  Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Soils  Elizabeth Alvarez   
1328 A new market for small producers of bananas and plantains: Innovation of technologies for the sustainable production of fuel Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-08-01  2009-06-30  In collaboration with Fontagro, the Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, we aim to strengthen banana and plantain value chains in Latin American and the Caribbean by using crop biomass to produce bioethanol. This is achieved through the development and implementation of a decentralized production system of bioethanol micro-plants, and the introduction of new technologies which take into consideration productivity optimization, cost reduction, and environmental conservation. Colombia, Ecuador, Peru  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2  ESPOL  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Elizabeth Alvarez   
1326 Helping lulo and blackberry producers be more competitive through participatory selection of elite clones, integrated crop management and strengthening value chains Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-05-01  2010-05-31  Through the application of various methodologies and techniques to improve the yield and quality of crop production, this project aims to help blackberry and lulo (naranjilla) producers become more competitive. Approaches include the selection and clonal propagation of elite germplasm, the identification of pest resistance among varieties, the development of biological control techniques, and the training of producers in in vitro breeding and integrated crop management. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2  Instituto Nacional Autónomo de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIAP) (Ecuador)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Elizabeth Alvarez   
1325 Strengthening plantain value chains: Technological innovations to reduce the use of agrochemicals Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-05-01  2010-05-31  Through the participation of farmers, researchers, and entrepreneurs, we aim to develop and implement quick and clean production systems for plantain. Activities include: implementing the use of compost leachate of crop residues and other green practices in the control of Sigatoka and Moko; validating and refining the biological control of weevils; and evaluating different genotypes for resistance to plantain weevil, looking at adaptability, productivity, and market acceptance. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2  Instituto Nacional Autónomo de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIAP) (Ecuador), Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Agrícolas (INIA), Venezuela  Agrobiodiversity  Elizabeth Alvarez   
1322 Detection of the causal agent of Musa Moko disease present in soil and asymptomatic plants through real-time PCR Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-04-01  2011-04-30  This project aims to design and implement a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based molecular test for the detection and quantification of Ralstonia solanacearum in soil, asymptomatic plants, and suckers. This technology is more sensitive and specific than currently used techniques based on traditional PCR, which do not detect pathogens in the initial stages of the disease. Resources for the project will also go towards training laboratory technicians and researchers in the implementation and application of qPCR to diagnose and prevent Moko disease in Musa. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC2  Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD)  Agrobiodiversity  Elizabeth Alvarez   
1298 Improved beans for Africa and Latin America Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2011-01-01  2011-12-31  This project aims to enhance the social impact of bean production and consumption in Latin America and Africa with the purpose of improving the productivity and nutritional value of common bean, specifically as a source of micronutrients. This forms a part of the core contribution to the CIAT Bean Program. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1315 Improved bean germplasm for Iran Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-10-01  2009-10-31  With the overall objective of providing drought and root rot resistant germplasm, activities within this project include developing root rot control methods for pathogens attacking chitti (cranberry) bean; improving drought tolerance and reducing water requirements of chitti bean; and strengthening capacity in bean improvement by providing advanced training to Iranian scientists in techniques of pathology, physiology and breeding, and to foment scientific exchange through field visits. Iran  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1316 Andean bean varieties obtained with resistance to Ascochyta and anthracnose through conventional breeding and molecular-marker assisted selection Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-07-01  2011-01-31  This project aims to train a Colombian student in the application of molecular markers in a practical breeding program. Specific research objectives include: Identifying sources of resistance to Ascochyta and promote their use. Generate F1 populations from crosses between sources of Asaochyta resistance and commercial bean varieties, Bola Rojo and Cargamento. Evaluate segregating populations produced as a result of the above crosses. Conduct phenotypic and genotypic assessments of segregating populations in order to identify molecular markers associated with resistance to Ascochyta and Antracnosis. Colombia  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1314 Micronutrient biofortification of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Panama Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-02-01  2012-02-29  This project aims is to increase and conserve agrobiodiversity of poroto bean as a mechanism to improve production systems, food security, and nutrition in vulnerable communities in urban and rural areas of Panama. This includes activities such as characterizing and evaluating local and introduced germplasm of poroto bean for their agronomic performance and nutritional content. Furthermore we aim to preserve the diversity of the poroto bean in Panama to prevent its loss, and use this as a basis to develop improved varieties with higher nutritional content. Panama  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1312 Basal root architecture and drought tolerance in common bean Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-01  2011-10-31  Beans have many different classes of roots. Basal roots are those which originate at the crown, and can vary widely in number. The project is designed to test if basal roots give plasticity to the plant to explore shallow soil strata for plant nutrients, and simultaneously to explore lower strata for moisture. The outcome will assist in the development of germplasm that is tolerant to low levels of soil phosphorus as well as to drought. Mozambique, United States of America      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1311 Development of “Nebraska” farm as a research platform for generation of new crop varieties and cropping systems adapted to the stressful soils of Eastern and Southern Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-05-01  2011-04-30  This project aims to create a research site for the evaluation of crops under low fertility conditions to develop germplasm of common bean and other crops that are tolerant of low fertility soils. The site in South Africa has been donated by Howard Buffet for research purposes, and is characterized by a sandy soil with very low native fertility. The site permits studying drought and low fertility (especially low available soil phosphorus) separately or in combination. Ethiopia, South Africa  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Soils  Steven Beebe   
1309 Students for analysis of drought tolerance in common bean Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-10-15  2010-10-14  This project aims to train breeders from Africa in physiological and genetic techniques of drought evaluation. Graduate research of the student from Zimbabwe initiated in phase 1 of TL-I and continues. The Ethiopian student has recently initiated research. Ethiopia, South Africa, Zimbabwe  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1307 Dry bean improvement and marker-assisted selection for diseases and abiotic stresses in Central America and the Caribbean Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-08-01  2008-12-31  This project will be one of the first to apply molecular breeding on a large scale to common bean improvement for the region of Central America and the Caribbean, and will focus on tolerance to drought stress and diseases that occur under drought and low soil fertility conditions. Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1306 Enhancing grain legumes productivity, production and income of poor farmers in drought-prone areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia (headquarters component) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-08-15  2010-08-31  This project targets crop breeding and delivery efforts to enhance impact on the livelihoods of the poor in drought-prone regions of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia as well as developing sustainable seed production and delivery systems for reaching the poor. Specific crops under investigation include: groundnut, cowpea, bean, chickpea, and pigeon pea. Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Zimbabwe  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2, 2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-TSBF1  Agricultural Research Services (DARS),Malawi, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Selian Agricultural Research Institute (SARI) - Tanzania  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe  Bernard VanLauwe, Jonas Nwankwo Chianu, Louise Sperling, Robin Buruchara 
1303 Improving tropical legume productivity for marginal environments in sub-Saharan Africa (headquarters component) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-05-01  2014-05-31  This project aims to contribute to the development of improved legume varieties in sub-Saharan Africa by developing genomic resources and molecular markers for traits of importance, and by implementing modern breeding in sub-Saharan Africa. Being a collaborative project, CIAT's specific role is to improve common bean productivity for marginal environments in sub-Saharan Africa. This project will address this issue along with additional important biotic stress resistance traits through five different activities. Ethiopia, Japan, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Zimbabwe  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2  Agricultural Research Services (DARS),Malawi, Selian Agricultural Research Institute (SARI) - Tanzania, University of Nairobi  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1220 Combating Hidden Hunger in Latin America: Biofortified Crops with Improved Vitamin A, Essential Minerals and Quality Protein Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2005-01-01  2010-12-31  AgroSalud research partners work in 14 Latin American and Caribbean countries in the development, evaluation, dissemination and promotion of biofortified crops and food products.  The ultimate goal of this project is to improve the nutritional status of the rural and urban poor, particularly children and lactating women, in target regions of Latin America. To achieve this, agronomic superior, micronutrient-dense beans and rice, Quality Protein Maize (QPM), and high vitamin A cassava and sweet-potato will be developed and deployed. Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2, 2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO3, 2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-LAC1  EMBRAPA, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Helena Pachón  Joseph Tohme, Steven Beebe 
1299 HarvestPlus Challenge Program: Biofortified crops for improved human nutrition Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-01-01  2011-12-31  This is an annual project carried out as part of the CGIAR HarvestPlus Challenge Program, which is bringing together scientific and research resources of the CGIAR to combat malnutrition in the developing world. Using phenotypic and marker-assisted selection, this project aims to biofortify varieties of beans to create lines with higher mineral content, especially iron, and superior agronomic traits. Bioefficacy trials are also conducted to demonstrate the value of high-iron beans. Congo Dem. Rep., Rwanda  2010-2012|CIAT|CIAT-AGBIO2  International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Steven Beebe   
1295 Associate Expert: Anne Rietveld, “Enterprise and Value Chain Strengthening to Improve the Livelihoods of Small-scale Banana Farmers in Eastern and Central Africa (Uganda) Bioversity International  2010-12-15  2013-12-14  Funded by the Dutch government, the aim of the AE Programme is to assist in the economic and social development of developing countries and contribute to the achievement of the goals, objectives and implementation of the international cooperation activities of the host organisation (Bioversity in this case). The AE has the opportunity to gain relevant experience in international cooperation activities through hands-on learning and contributes to the overall goals of the AE Programme- the economic and social development of developing countries. The Programme considers technical assistance, policy advice and capacity building as the main tools for achieving these goals. Bioversity has just been granted funds for a socio economist and applications will be reviewed by 30th June 2010. By their perishable nature, bananas must be sold as quickly as they are mature.  This, coupled with the lack of a reliable source of market information and with limited value-addition capacity, forces individual small scale farmers to sell their banana at any price offered by vendors.    This has resulted into constant loss of income and has significantly contributed to the decline in living conditions and increased poverty in small-scale farming-systems-dependent communities in the great lakes region of east Africa.  A frequently proposed alternative is for farmer organizations to consolidate greater volumes of production, to strengthen local negotiating power and to improve understanding of markets and prices.  The implementation of such strategies is incipient and has often been based specialty crops such as cocoa, essential oils and natural medicinal products. The opportunities for refocusing value-chains for food crops towards greater farmer participation and greater value are abundant, but have not been the focus of most research projects.  In 2009-2010, Bioversity International is undertaking three new research grants with components focused on the marketing of banana biodiversity for increased added value to small-scale farmers and their rural community enterprises. In these new grants the proposed associate expert will work to integrate production technology testing and promoting value-addition and marketing initiatives in banana producing communities in six countries in the region.  The associate expert will have the opportunity to collaborate with Bioversity staff, external consultants and national counterparts in the development of strategies to improve the contribution of banana production and marketing to rural development and to the reduction of rural poverty.  The associate expert will: - Review relevant methods and experiences on value chain analysis and governance, farmer organization strengthening and market identification and development in east Africa and collaborate with researchers in other regions of the continent; - Conduct applied research directly and in collaboration with students and collaborators to understand livelihood strategies of banana producing households, to describe current market channels, to identify alternative differentiated and niche markets for banana and banana products, to develop strategies for improving value chain governance mechanisms to the benefit of rural communities and to develop strategies for establishing and strengthening farmer organizations to the benefit of poor households; - Prepare and carry out training activities based on methods adapted from other projects and incorporating research results in the project directed towards farm households and incipient farmer organizations, actors in value chains and service providers linked to improving chain governance; - Link project staff and counterparts from national partners to the growing body of experience on value chains, marketing strategies, farmer organizations, entrepreneurship and rural development; - Participate in other activities contributing to the success of the projects.  The work plan will address important global questions (food security, income, nutrition), while at the same time contributing to the specific needs of banana farmers in the on-going projects. Burundi, Congo Dem. Rep., Uganda  2010-2012|Bioversity|BIOVERSITY-F03    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Anne Rietveld  Eldad Karamura 
1274 Increasing food security and household income through small stock market development in Zimbabwe International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-12-10  2011-12-31  The project aims to increase food security and incomes for small-scale farmers by commercializing the livestock sector through the creation of efficient market systems.Target group are the smallholder farmers in Matabeleland South. Because an overwhelming majority of households own goats the project ensures that the poorer sectors of the population benefit. A focus on goats ensures that the project benefits women farmers and vulnerable groups such as child-headed households.Food security at the household level can be improved in these areas if the high rates of goat mortalities can be curbed and farmers are able to sell these animals at well functioning markets for good prices. While goat keepers are the main target group, other beneficiaries include the value chain (VC) players (input and output), local authorities and the small entrepreneurs selling their produce at livestock sale pens.  They will have the opportunity to benefit from exploring new markets, fostering closer relationships with clients and improving their efficiency by marketing their products through more targeted strategies. Although policy makers are not directly targeted by the project, outputs from this project will provide crucial information on the impact of market development on food security and income growth, as well as providing very specific information to guide future policies for small stock sector.  Smallholder farmers in Matabeleland South; there are approximately 91,000 households in Matabeleland South (Zimbabwe National Census, 2002). Because an overwhelming majority of households own goats the project ensures that the poorer sectors of the population benefit. A focus on goats ensures that the project benefits women farmers and vulnerable groups such as child-headed households. Food security at the household level can be improved in these areas if the high rates of goat mortalities can be curbed and farmers are able to sell these animals at well functioning markets for good prices. If each of the M1,03 households in Zimbabwe sells one more goat per annum than before, that would place a million more goats, representing USD 20,000,000, on the market. This can be achieved through improved feed and animal health systems. While goat keepers are the main target group, other beneficiaries include the value chain (VC) players (input and output), local authorities and the small entrepreneurs selling their produce at livestock sale pens.  They will have the opportunity to benefit from exploring new markets, fostering closer relationships with clients and improving their efficiency by marketing their products through more targeted strategies. NARS and development organizations will increase the efficiency of extension and support services as a result of the IP, FFS, and strengthened farmer-based organizations.   Although policy makers are not directly targeted by the project, outputs from this project will provide crucial information on the impact of market development on food security and income growth, as well as providing very specific information to guide future policies for small stock sector.    Zimbabwe      Livestock, Market Access  Andre Van Rooyen   
1273 Exploiting host plant resistance for Helicoverpa management to increase the production and productivity of chickpea and pigeonpea under rainfed conditions in India International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2008-02-28  2013-02-27  Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] are the two most important pulse crops in India. Though India produces about 64% of the chickpea and 90% of the pigeonpea globally, the production still is not adequate to meet the domestic demand. As a result, India has to spend over Rs. 1,000 crores every year on pulse imports. Pulse production has remained static over the past two decades. Several biotic constrains limit the productivity of pulses, of which, the cotton bollworm/legume pod borer, Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner), is the most important. There are immense opportunities for enhancing the production and productivity of chickpea and pigeonpea through a rational deployment of crop varieties with resistance/tolerance to this pest. The losses due to Helicoverpa are also aggravated by frequent occurrence of drought, which not only reduces the overall productivity of these pulses, but also makes the crops more vulnerable to damage by Helicoverpa.The impact of program for accelerated development and deployment of high-yielding cultivars of chickpea and pigeonpea for increasing the production of these crops under rainfed conditions will be limited unless due emphasis is placed on identifying varieties with less susceptibility to Helicoverpa so that the farmers do not have to resort to frequent application of toxic pesticides, which not only kill the non-target natural enemies, but also leave harmful residues on the produce. Therefore, this project aims to identify Helicoverpa-resistant varieties in the germplasm collection maintained at ICRISAT Genebank (Over 15,000 accessions) and the lines developed under the ISOPM project to provide information on their susceptibility to this serious pest, and undertake multilocational testing of Helicoverpa-resistant varieties of chickpea and pigeonpea that have earlier been identified/developed at ICRISAT, and in the national programs to identify lines for cultivation by the farmers under rainfed conditions in drought prone environments. Emphasis will also be placed on identifying genotypes with diverse mechanisms of resistance to increase the levels and diversify the bases of resistance to this pest. Efforts will also be made to understand the effect of Helicoverpa-resistant cultivars on economic thresholds, reduction in pesticide use, and their effect on the natural enemies to devise appropriate strategies for Helicoverpa management on these crops through a rational deployment of resistant varieties and 3 need based application of cost effective insecticides, and other methods for the management of this difficult to control, devastating pest. India    Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU), ARS Tandur, Andhra Pradesh, Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University, RARS-Nandyal, Andhra Pradesh, India, University of Agricultural Sciences, Gulburga, Karnataka  Crops  HC Sharma  CLL Gowda, K B Saxena, Pooran Gaur 
1272 Crop biofortification of groundnut and pigeonpea for alleviating vitamin A deficiencies in India International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-09-21  2013-09-20  The ultimate outcome anticipated from this research project is to develop improved varieties of groundnut and pigeonpea having higher levels of ß-carotene without compromising the yield and other agronomic traits related to farmers and consumers acceptance. This long-term sustainable strategy is expected to prevent/control micronutrient malnutrition in a vast population in the developing countries of the world where these crops are grown, including India, where they form a major component of diet as secondary staple. Such strategies are cost-effective, feasible, and can be sustainably implemented under conditions where supplementation and fortification are currently not practical or economically feasible.   India      Crops  KK Sharma  Pooja Bhatnagar 
1270 Sustaining farmer-managed seed initiatives for sorghum and pearl millet in Mali, Niger, and Burkina Faso International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-06-01  2014-05-31  The project seeks to strengthen the dynamics of local social seed networks so as to improve local seed availability and thus increase the adoption of new sorghum and pearl millet varieties for improved food security and income. The regional spread of new varieties will be pursued by building on past seed commercialization efforts. The specific objectives of this project include: Improve women (and men) farmers’ access to seed of new sorghum and pearl millet varieties in targeted regions of Niger, Burkina Faso and Mali. This project phase will increase women’s involvement in variety evaluation, focusing on traditional and newly formed women’s groups, associations and organizations. Also, women’s engagement in quality seed production and possibly marketing will be initiated. Work on methods and tools for better variety evaluation by farmers and farmer associations, including a reliable assessment of the quantity of food produced per unit area of harvested crop will be pursued. Methods and tools for communicating the results of individual site variety evaluations at an appropriate scale will be developed. Understand and enhance the effectiveness of different activities for enhancing seed availability and knowledge about the new varieties. Monitoring will focus on the variety adoption process, including yearly changes in variety use, and shall contribute to understand farmers’ (female and male) responses to climate variability and other changes in the external environment. Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger    Association des Organisations Professionnelles Paysannes (AOPP), Mali, Association Minim Song Panga (AMSP),Burkina Faso , Institut d’Economie Rural (IER)- Mali, Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Burkina Faso, Institut de Recherches Agronomiques du Niger (INRAN), Niger, The Federation of Unions of Farmers’ Groups of Niger (FUGPN-Mooriben), Niger, Union de Groupement pour la commercialisation des Produits Agricole, Boucle du Mouhoun (UGCPA/BM), Burkina Fas, Union Locale des Producteurs de Céréales(ULPC), Mali  Crops, Seed Systems  E Weltzien   
1268 Increasing food security and farmer livelihoods through enhanced legume cultivation in the central dry zone of Myanmar International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2007-01-01  2011-05-31  The aim of the project is to improve the food security, nutritional health and livelihood needs of the poor farmers and communities in Myanmar by increasing productivity of pulse and oilseed legumes. Legumes are the second most important group of crops in Myanmar behind rice and are currently grown on 3.3 million ha. Projections are for at least 4.5 million ha by 2010. Legumes are primarily grown by small-holder farmers with minimal inputs of fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides. Yields are low at about 1.0 t/ha. Apart from the lack of inputs, availability to pest- and disease ­resistant, high-yielding varieties remains a major constraint to legume yield. Limited experimental and anecdotal evidence suggests also that productivity and yield may be further diminished because of poor nodulation. It follows that introduction of adapted high-yielding legume cultivars into the cropping systems of Myanmar, coupled with high-quality, locally ­produced rhizobial inoculants to address the nodulation problem, should improve legume and system productivity and profitability. The specific objectives to achieve the above aim are to: Identify and distribute high-yielding chickpea, groundnut and pigeonpea cultivars adapted to the relevant cropping systems ofthe Central Dry Zone of Myanmar, using farmer participatory varietal selection Increase production of high-quality rhizobial inoculants in Myanmar through application of a cost-effective strategy involving equipment and procedural changes, quality assurance, R&D and training Conduct training and extension programs on legume improvement and inoculant technology in order to enhance capacity for research and extension in these disciplines in Myanmar and to facilitate uptake of project outputs. Myanmar    Department of Agricultural Research (DAR), Myanmar, Myanmar Agricultural Services (MAS), New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI), Sydney  Crops, Seed Systems  G RangaRao  CLL Gowda, K B Saxena, Pooran Gaur, SN Nigam 
1267 Re-designing the farmer-extension-agricultural research/education continuum in India with ICT-mediated knowledge management International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2007-09-01  2011-12-01  The project is expected to result in significant enhancement of capacity among agricultural experts at various levels in the refinement and management of new knowledge flows and platforms. It will also enhance the capacity of ICT professionals to develop autonomous relationships with the NARES organizations to serve farmers through the ICT-mediated kiosks. It will lead to a highly integrated knowledge and information services model that can be deployed easily among all organizations working towards improved food and livelihood security of farmers in India. Objectives:   To build, demonstrate and sustain a model agricultural knowledge organization and system in support of extension in India;   To develop and manage an online and offline  forum for management of farm level Q&A  and discussions which is integrated with knowledge  generation and organization;   To build and demonstrate an online as well as offline multi-modal information delivery arrangement linking online content and expert knowledge  with query services;   To build and sustain geospatial data and knowledge organization  systems  to support agricultural research, education  and technology transfer;   To build capacity among agricultural experts in the advanced management of highly integrated information services in support of education, research and extension;    To develop methods for viable integration of back-end digital systems and processes to foster  autonomous, long term  collaboration between the ICT sector and the NARES organizations in India  Objectives:   1.      To build, demonstrate and sustain a model agricultural knowledge organization and system in support of extension in India;   2.      To develop and manage an online and offline  forum for management of farm level Q&A  and discussions which is integrated with knowledge  generation and organization;   3.      To build and demonstrate an online as well as offline multi-modal information delivery arrangement linking online content and expert knowledge  with query services;   4.      To build and sustain geospatial data and knowledge organization  systems  to support agricultural research, education  and technology transfer;   5.      To build capacity among agricultural experts in the advanced management of highly integrated information services in support of education, research and extension;   To develop methods for viable integration of back-end digital systems and processes to foster  autonomous, long term  collaboration between the ICT sector and the NARES organizations in India India    Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU), India, Govind Ballabh (GB) Pant University Of Agriculture and Technology, India, Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management-Kerala (IIITM-K), Indian Institute of technology, Bombay, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, National Academy of Agricultural Research Management (NAARM), India  Crops  N Yaduraju   
1266 Groundnut varieties improvement for yield and adaptation, human health, and nutrition International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-09-01  2014-08-31  The project goal is reduction of poverty by improving income level, food and nutrition security through investments to improve groundnut yields, understanding the level of aflatoxin contamination in Malawi and Tanzania and effects on human health,  designing and implementing strategies for contamination reduction.   The two countries have more than 300,000 farm families who can benefit directly from adopting improved groundnut technologies.  Project strategy involves diagnostic studies, breeding and capacity building to address low yields, diseases (rosette, ELS, and rust), aflatoxin contamination and drought.  Project impact will contribute to improvement of rural livelihoods, better human health and increased incomes from trade. Malawi, Tanzania    Department of Research and Training (DRT) - Tanzania, Kamuzu Central Hospital, Malawi, National Association of Smallholder Farmers in Malawi (NASFAM), Sokoine University of Agriculture - Tanzania  Crops  Emmanuel Monyo  Andre Van Rooyen, Farid Waliyar, Moses Siambi 
1255 Chickpea – Accelerating development of genomic resources and strengthening NARS partner capacities for enhancing adoption of molecular breeding for drought tolerance in chickpea International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-07-01  2014-06-30  The Chickpea Challenge Initiative (CCI) supports the overall objectives of the Tropical Legumes I Phase II (TLI-Phase II) project to develop and help institutionalize modern breeding of chickpea in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and South Asia (SA). More specifically, the CCI supports key components of two of the TL-1 Phase II workplan activities, 1) Develop genomic resources for enhancing MABC and MARS activities, and 2) Strengthen capacity of NARS partners. The objectives of CCI Activity 1 include developing closely linked molecular markers with QTLs for drought tolerance, identification of informative set of SNP markers for crosses being employed in the TLI and TLII breeding efforts, developing cost effective SNP genotyping platform and implementing selection tools being developed by the Integrated Breeding Platform (IBP), SNP genotyping and data production in support of MARS breeding being conducted under TLI Phase II Activity 3.  Activity 2, with active participation of NARS partners, will have heavy emphasis on capacity building in the area of modern breeding by facilitating research activities of NARS partners including PhD and Masters degree students hosted by them (Kenya and Ethiopia). The Phase II of TL-I has a plan to organize one training course at Patancheru (India) for NARS partners of TLI and TLII team members. This CCI proposal will strengthen the activities of Activity 4 of Phase II of TL-I to enhance the effectiveness and practicality of molecular breeding for delivery of improved chickpea varieties in SSA and SA. In summary, the important outputs of of this CCI proposal will include: a) a larger number of markers associated with QTLs for drought tolerance will be available for screening the polymorphism between recipient and donor genotypes, b) a larger number of informative set of SNPs for crosses being deployed in TL-I and TL-II, c) cost effective genotyping platform for molecular breeding, and d) enhanced capacity of NARS partners to undertake molecular breeding in chickpea Ethiopia, India, Kenya    Egerton University,Kenya, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)  Crops  Rajeev Varshney  Siva kumar, Pooran Gaur, Thudi Mahendar 
1254 Centre of excellence for high-throughput allele determination for molecular breeding International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2011-01-01  2013-12-31  The Center of Excellence in Genomics (CEG)at ICRISAT proposes to focus its efforts over the next three years on three main components: (a) Genotyping Services, (b) Capacity Strengthening, and (c) Modern Pulse Improvement. During the past three years, the CEG has offered SSR and DArT genotyping services to a number of partners for a range of projects.CEG plan to continue to offer cost effective and high-throughput genotyping services to Indian national programmes on cost-tocost basis and to add SNP analyses to the suite of molecular marker services. Since 2008, the CEG has provided training to about 200 scientists including 161 Indian scientists by organizing 8 training courses in the area of molecular marker technologies .CEG now plan to offer training in high-throughput SNP genotyping data analysis, deployment of modern breeding methodologies such as MABC, MARS and GS in crop improvement to at least 50 Indian scientists involved in pulse improvement. In collaboration of the GCP’s TLI project, IARI, IIPR and ICRISAT will partner in molecular breeding research to enhance drought tolerance in leading Indian chickpea varieties by employing MABC and MARS approaches using the SNP genotyping facilities. In addition, ANGRAU, IIPR and ICRISAT will partner in the molecular mapping of FW and SMD resistance in pigeonpea. Collectively,the project aims to build a Centre of Excellence in Genomics that not only provide critical services for Indian scientists, but also help improve the productivity of two leading Indian pulse crops- chickpea and pigeonpea. The outputs of the CEG will be shared with the wider pulse communities through the AICRPs on Chickpea and Pigeonpea. India    Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU), India, Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI), New Delhi, Indian Institute of Pulses Research  Crops, Seed Systems  Rajeev Varshney  Abhishek Rathore, Isabel Vales, Mamta Sharma, Oscar Riera-Lizarazu, Pooran Gaur, Thudi Mahendar, Shah Trushar, Vincent Vadez 
1253 Increasing agricultural productivity of farming systems in parts of central India through participatory research-cum-demonstration and knowledge sharing innovations International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2008-03-01  2012-02-28  The overall objective of this project is to increase the impact of the development projects in Central India through technical backstopping and empowerment of stakeholders to improve livelihoods through increased agricultural productivity and livelihood opportunities via sustainable use of natural resources. The specific objectives of this technical assistance program are:  To establish a holistic participatory IGNRM model for the convergence of activities in 4 nucleus clusters (five villages in each cluster) encompassing suitable technical, institutional, gender equity, and policy options for enhanced agricultural productivity and crop-livestock management systems to alleviate poverty; and To provide technical know-how to farmers, landless rural people in the target districts, and partner NGOs supported by the SRTT in the region through empowerment by bringing together learnings from national and international experience. India    Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture in India, Foundation for Ecological Security, India, Gramin Vikas Trust(GVT), Madhya Pradesh, India, Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal, Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya(JNKVV), India, Pradan, India, Tata Steel Rural Development Society (TSRDS), Jharkhand, India  Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Water Management  Suhas Wani   
1251 Value Chain Model for Bio-ethanol Production from Sweet Sorghum in Rainfed areas through Collective Action and Partnership International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2008-01-12  2012-06-30    Objectives: Assess economic and environmental viability, enabling policies and institutions for promoting cultivation of sweet sorghum for bio-ethanol production and its impact on environment, rural incomes, livelihoods and social capital development. Develop and establish pilot-scale Public Private People Partnership (PPPPs) value chain bio-ethanol enterprise models through "Seed-to-Tank" approach encompassing sweet sorghum production, processing, value addition, marketing and protecting environment. Farmers’ participatory multilocation testing of the improved biomass (stalks and grain) and juice yielding sweet sorghum cultivars under on-farm situations and development of production and seed systems in the targeted area. Fine-tuning of package of practices for increased harvest window, mechanization and development of protocols for by-product utilization.     Capacity building and skill development of all the stakeholders including rural communities in the enhanced sweet sorghum production and value chain for bio-ethanol production. India    International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), National Research Center for Sorghum (NRCS), India  Crops, Ecosystem Management, Market Access  Belum Reddy  A Ashok Kumar, G RangaRao, KK Sharma, K Parthasarathy Rao, Rosana P Mula, Suhas Wani 
1249 Centre of Excellence for High-throughput Allele Determination for Molecular Breeding International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2006-01-01  2010-12-31  The Center of Excellence in Genomics (CEG)at ICRISAT proposes to focus its efforts over the next three years on three main components: (a) Genotyping Services, (b) Capacity Strengthening, and (c) Modern Pulse Improvement.  During the past three years, the CEG has offered SSR and DArT genotyping services to a number of partners for a range of projects (Annexure I). We plan to continue to offer cost effective and high-throughput genotyping services to Indian national programmes on cost-to-cost basis and to add SNP analyses to the suite of molecular marker services. Since 2008, the CEG has provided training to about 200 scientists including 161 Indian scientists by organizing 8 training courses in the area of molecular marker technologies .In this project CEG plan to offer training in high-throughput SNP genotyping data analysis, deployment of modern breeding methodologies such as MABC, MARS and GS in crop improvement to atleast 50 Indian scientists involved in pulse improvement. In collaboration of the GCP’s TLI project, IARI, IIPR and ICRISAT will partner in molecular breeding research to enhance drought tolerance in leading Indian chickpea varieties by employing MABC and MARS approaches using the SNP genotyping facilities. In addition, ANGRAU, IIPR and ICRISAT will partner in the molecular mapping of FW and SMD resistance in pigeonpea. Collectively, the partners will continue to build a Centre of Excellence in Genomics to not only provide critical services for Indian scientists, but to help improve the productivity of two leading Indian pulse crops- chickpea and pigeonpea. The outputs of the CEG will be shared with the wider pulse communities through the AICRPs on Chickpea and Pigeonpea.   India    Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University (ANGRAU), India, Indian Institute of Pulses Research  Crops  Rajeev Varshney  Abhishek Rathore, Isabel Vales, Mamta Sharma, Oscar Riera-Lizarazu, Pooran Gaur, Thudi Mahendar, Shah Trushar, Vincent Vadez 
1248 Improving farmer livelihoods and food security through enhanced legume productivity in India and Myanmar International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-12-10  2011-12-31  The overall goal of the project is to empower farmers and researchers in India and Myanmar to improve livelihoods through enhanced productivity of legume crops.   The main objectives are:  To enhance the productivity and production of legume crops (groundnut, chickpea and pigeonpea) through scaling up of  better adapted  cultivars and crop management technologies in target areas of India and Myanmar;   To evaluate and fine tune the seed production model developed to consolidate the  legume seed requirement of the country; and  To strengthen the capacity of partners (researchers and farmers) to develop, test and disseminate new varieties and crop management technologies that increase crop productivity and production India, Myanmar      Crops, Land Management, Seed Systems  G RangaRao   
1247 Integrated management of rainwater to improve smallholder productivity and livelihoods and reduce risk. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-08-01  2013-11-30  The project seeks to define the interplay between market access, crop and livestock technologies, and investment risks in water- and market-scarce environments that leads to technology adoption by farm families, enabling them to enhance food security and incomes through more efficient water use. Three main work areas will contribute to this objective.  Water efficient farm enterprises and climate risk management Innovation Platforms will be established at project sites to bring together all role players necessary to increase investments in farm management strategies to improve productivity of crop and livestock systems through improved fodder production. Outputs of the other two work areas will feed into the innovation platform process. The important outcome here is the development of an understanding that increased investments at farm level will have beneficial returns at the market place that compensate for climate-related production risks. Investment choices matched to farmer capacities and climatic risk environment Understanding how the capacity of farmers and their ability to make use of new opportunities is affected by their wealth status, investment priorities and variable climate will assist in the design of new and more target-specific crop-livestock management strategies. Through participatory modeling and scenario analysis we can learn together what the impacts of specific interventions are, which farmers can make use of them, and who may adopt them. On-farm testing will substantiate the efficacy of the technologies and the potential for out-scaling. Market-led technologies for smallholder farmers developed and tested The project will use market access as the driver of crop and livestock technology uptake. Market development initiatives such as contract farming, voucher-based input distribution schemes for seed and fertilizer and innovative fertilizer marketing strategies will be implemented by project partners, technically supported by research and extension and monitored for impacts across the value chain.   Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe      Crops, Livestock, Market Access, Water Management  Andre Van Rooyen   
1244 Programme for Harnessing the True Potential of legumes : Economic and Knowledge Empowerment of Poor Farmers in rainfed Areas in Asia International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2007-10-17  2011-12-31  The overall goal of the project is to improve the well being of rural poor in Asia through sustainable increases in agricultural productivity based on the wider adoption of grain legumes in rainfed cropping systems. The specific objectives of the new project are to: 1. Consolidate and out- and up-scale the gains achieved in IFAD TAG 532-ICRISAT with the required fine-tuning of farmer participatory research outputs for new areas, particularly those covered under the IFAD loan-financed projects 2. Develop seed production, storage and distribution systems to make small and marginal farmers self-reliant and self- sufficient for seed requirements of FPVs of food legumes. 3. Promote forward and backward market linkages and value addition in legumes at local level. 4. Popularize the FPRE approach among NARS, extension officials and farmers, and assess its institutional impact; and 5. Assess the impact of FPVs and integrated crop management technologies (ICM) of grain legumes in rainfed production system on the socio-economic conditions of farmers vis-àvis sustainable increased productivity, food and nutritional security and improved family well being Legumes form an integral part of rainfed agriculture. Not only do they help in improving the soil fertility and its structure, they also provide food and nutritional security and diversified sources of income for poor farmers and valuable protein-rich fodder to livestock. Legumes bring stability and improvement to rainfed agriculture and to the livelihoods of poor farmers. India, Nepal, Vietnam      Crops  SN Nigam   
1238 Sustainable Conservation and Utilization of Genetic Resources of two underutilized Crops Finger Millet and Foxtail Millet – to Enhance Productivity, Nutrition and Income in Africa and Asia International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2008-01-01  2011-12-31  The project is aimed to enhance food security and reduce malnutrition in Africa and Asia through more efficient conservation and use of two currently underutilized species with high nutrient value and excellent adaptability: finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv). The access of partner National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS) to diverse finger and foxtail millet germplasm will be enhanced through development and joint evaluation of core and mini core collections. These collections will be characterized for agronomic characters, nutrient contents (protein, iron, zinc, calcium, and ß-carotene), and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Genotyping with micro-satellite markers will serve to determine population structure and genetic diversity at the DNA level. Combination of marker and phenotypic data will lead to identification of genetically diverse, trait specific germplasm for targeted use in breeding programs, genetic studies, and for direct cultivation by farmers. En­hanced cultivation by farmers of the superior and diverse finger and foxtail millet germplasm will increase productivity, availability of nutritional rich food, and marketing opportunities, and contribute to in-situ conservation of the two species. The NARS’ capacity to breed these high-value minor millets, to use genetic resources in breeding and to employ new molecular tools will be strengthened. India, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda    Department of Research and Development (DRD) - Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security - Tanzania, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)- Uganda, University of Agricultural Science, Bangalore, India, University of Hohenheim, Germany  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  HD Upadhyaya  CLL Gowda, Mary Mgonja, Rajeev Varshney 
1235 Adapting agriculture to climate change: Developing promising strategies using analogue locations in Eastern and Southern Africa International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2011-01-01  2013-12-31  Using a combination of model-based ex ante analyses and iterative field-based research on station and in farmers’ fields, the project will test potential agricultural adaptation strategies for rainfed agriculture in the semi-arid and dry sub-humid tropics.  This will be achieved through choosing four currently important crop production zones (two in Kenya and two in Zimbabwe) and then identifying corresponding ‘spatial analogue locations’ for each production zone, providing eight study locations in all. We define “analogue locations” as those locations that have today the climatic characteristics that are expected tomorrow in our four chosen production zones. In defining the locations, special attention will be given to adaptation to temperature increases. Altitudinal effects on mean air temperature will facilitate this. Given the potential of ‘analogue locations’ to provide a solid basis for such research across sub-Saharan Africa, special attention will also be given to the continuous documentation and dissemination of project activities and achievements through the web, newsletters and dissemination events.  A strong element of participatory research with famers within the project locations will ensure that the project activities and outputs remain relevant to their needs and expectations.  Expected outputs are: Four important crop growing areas in Kenya and Zimbabwe which comprise (i) cool/dry, (ii) cool/wet, (iii) warm/dry and (iv) warm/wet growing conditions and their temperature analogue locations, identified and fully characterized. Through the combined use of long-term daily climate data, crop growth simulation models and participatory surveys with farmers, the implications of both current and future (climate change) production risk at the study locations identified and quantified. Through iterative field research both on station and in farmers’ fields over a 2-year period, potential crop, soil and water management and crop genotype adaptation options evaluated and adaptation strategies formulated for the target locations. Through the wide promotion of the project, dissemination of its activities, results and hands-on capacity building, the strengthened institutional capacity (both in understanding climate change impacts and developing effective adaptation responses) will be ensured. Kenya, Zimbabwe    Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kenya Meteorological Department (KMD)  Climate Change, Crops  Dave Harris  KPC Rao, Peter Craufurd, Suresh Pande 
1234 Taking Pigeonpea Hybrids to the Doorsteps of Farmers under National Food Security Mission (NFSM) International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2007-04-01  2012-03-31  In India pigeonpea is cultivated in a range of agro-ecological conditions.The varietal requirements are also diverse. For example in north-west plains shortduration (4 months), in central/southern India medium-duration (6 months), and in north-east plains long-duration (9 months) varieties are adapted. For obvious reasons the biotic and abiotic stresses in these regions are also different. Therefore, to harness the maximum gains we need to develop high-yielding hybrids for each major agroecology and it would be possible when in each group we develop quality hybrid parents with high combing ability, disease resistance, and adaptability.In this project, therefore, our effort will be to develop hybrids with significant genetic and cytoplasmic diversity to suit different production niches and cropping systems. This will be achieved in active collaboration with Agricultural Universities located in different parts of the country. We will also join hands with advanced biotechnology laboratories to conduct basic research on specialized issues such mapping of fertility restorer genes, laboratory based grow-out quality tests etc. We would also like to involve public Seed Laboratories to develop seed quality standards for hybrid pigeonpea. The sharing of knowledge and materials with public and private institutions in the country will help in taking this technology to the farmers. To make hybrid seed available to the farmers at reasonable costs we also propose to develop hybrid pigeonpea seed villages in participation with young farmers. India    Marathwada Agricultural University,Parbhani,India, Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth (PDKV),India, University of Agricultural sciences ,Dharwad (UAS-D),India  Crops, Market Access, Seed Systems  K B Saxena   
1231 Improving the Food Security and Climate Change Adaptability of Livestock Producers using the Rainfed Barley-based System International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2011-03-05  2014-03-31  Iraq, Jordan      Climate Change, Crops, Livestock  Nasri Haddad   
1230 Enhancement of Food Security in the Arab Region International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-09-01  2013-05-31  Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Yemen      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Market Access  Habib Halila   
1229 International Training Programme on “Regional Development in the Euphrates-Tigris Region 2010/201 International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-10-01  2011-04-01  Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan      Policy & Institutions  Fadi Karam   
1228 Programme for Improved Water Management for Sustainable Mountain Agriculture: Jordan, Lebanon and Morocco. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-12-16  2014-12-31  Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco      Land Management, Water Management    Theib Oweis 
1227 Preparation and Design of Agricultural Water Resources and Infrastructure Development (AWRID) Component of National Agriculture Programme (NAP). International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-12-01  2011-10-31  Eritrea      Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Eddy DePauw   
1226 Development of Community-based Informal Seed Production Enterprises for Promoting the Conservation of Field Crop Landraces in Palestine International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-10-29  2013-12-31  West Bank and Gaza      Agrobiodiversity, Market Access, Seed Systems    Nasri Haddad 
1225 Grasspea production for safe human food, animal feed and sustainable rice based production system in India. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-10-29  2012-03-31  India      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Seed Systems  Ashutosh Sarker   
1224 Introduction of short duration pulses into rice-based cropping systems in western Bangladesh. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2011-01-01  2015-12-30  Bangladesh      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Seed Systems  Ashutosh Sarker   
1223 Pre-breeding and genetic enhancement in breaking yield barriers in Kabuli chickpea and lentil through DAC-ICARDA-ICAR collaboration. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-08-25  2012-03-31  India      Agrobiodiversity, Seed Systems  Ashutosh Sarker   
1222 Enhancing lentil production for food and nutritional security, and improved rural livelihoods. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-08-25  2012-03-31  India      Agrobiodiversity, Seed Systems  Ashutosh Sarker   
1221 Regional Agricultural Information network for West Asia & North Africa (WANA-RAIN). International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-10-15  2012-12-31  Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic      Policy & Institutions  Michael Devlin   
1209 Taking Pigeonpea Hybrids to the Doorsteps of Farmers under National Food Security Mission (NFSM) International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2007-04-01  2012-03-31  In India pigeonpea is cultivated in a range of agro-ecological conditions, accordingly the varietal requirements are also diverse. For example in north-west plains shortduration (4 months), in central/southern India medium-duration (6 months), and in north-east plains long-duration (9 months) varieties are adapted. For obvious reasons the biotic and abiotic stresses in these regions are also different. Therefore, to harness the maximum gains we need to develop high-yielding hybrids for each major agroecology and it would be possible when in each group we develop quality hybrid parents with high combing ability, disease resistance, and adaptability. In this project, therefore, our effort will be to develop hybrids with significant genetic and cytoplasmic diversity to suit different production niches and cropping systems. This will be achieved in active collaboration with Agricultural Universities located in different parts of the country. We will also join hands with advanced biotechnology laboratories to conduct basic research on specialized issues such mapping of fertility restorer genes, laboratory based grow-out quality tests etc. We would also like to involve public Seed Laboratories to develop seed quality standards for hybrid pigeonpea. The sharing of knowledge and materials with public and private institutions in the country will help in taking this technology to the farmers. To make hybrid seed available to the farmers at reasonable costs we also propose to develop hybrid pigeonpea seed villages in participation with young farmers. India    Marathwada Agricultural University,Parbhani,India, Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth (PDKV),India, University of Agricultural sciences ,Dharwad (UAS-D),India  Crops, Seed Systems  K B Saxena   
1206 Enhancing Chickpea Production in Rainfed Rice Fallow land (RRFL) of Chattisgarh and Madhya Pradesh States of India following Improved Pulse Production and Protection Technologies (IPPPT) under National Food Security Mission (NFSM-Pulses) International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2008-10-01  2012-09-30  Chickpea is the most important pulse accounting for more than 70% of the global production in India. Chickpea is the cheapest source of protein and is the inseparable part of the daily diets of every Indian.  In spite of being the largest producer, India has to import chickpea up to 1.5 Million tons every year to meet its domestic requirements. It is unlikely that area under chickpea will ever increase in the irrigated regions of the country. The aim of the project is to gain self sufficiency in chickpea-pulse production through increased productivity by expanding improved pulse production and protection technologies (IPPPT), and establishing village level seed system in the rainfed rice fallow lands (RRFL) of selected regions inIndia.Project objectives include:  To enhance capacity at field level for farmer-participatory research and extension (FPRE) in adoption and expansion of improved chickpea-pulse production and protection technologies (IPPPT) in rainfed rice fallow lands To multiply and distribute farmer-preferred chickpea varieties along with IPPPT (including IDM, IPM and INM) for sustainable intensification of rainfed rice fallow cropping systems Empowerment among farmers and participating local institutions, on FPRE/IPPPT to establish village-based seed system (s) to achieve self-sufficiency in seeds of farmer-preferred, improved varieties of chickpea at the village level Research backstopping for further improvement of chickpea varieties for traits and IPPPT components preferred by the farmers and traders in the target area India    Jawaharlal Nehru Agricultural University, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India  Crops, Land Management, Seed Systems  Suresh Pande  CLL Gowda, Mamta Sharma, Pooran Gaur 
1205 Enhanced Livelihood Opportunities of Smallholders in Asia: Linking Smallholder Sweet Sorghum Farmers with the Bioethanol Industry International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-12-11  2013-12-10  The project will mobilise groups of smallholder sweet sorghum farmers in order to improve crop productivity and enhance production and marketing of sweet sorghum to distilleries. The project will engage private seed companies, input suppliers and farmer groups for effective input delivery mechanisms. Apart from direct delivery arrangements for neighbouring villages, the project also seeks to link commonly excluded remote farmer groups with commercial distilleries through introduction of decentralised processing of sweet sorghum juice into syrup. Overall the project will contribute to increased incomes to farmers, without compromising food and fodder security. China, India, Thailand      Crops, Market Access, Seed Systems  Belum Reddy  A Ashok Kumar, CLL Gowda, Ch Ravinder Reddy, K Parthasarathy Rao, P Srinivasa Rao 
1203 Impact assessment study of the Nigeria avian influenza control and human pandemic preparedness and response project International Livestock Research Institute  2010-12-01  2011-04-30  In 2006, the Federal Government of Nigeria received a World Bank credit of USD 50 million-equivalent provided under the Bank’s Global Program for Avian Influenza and Human Pandemic Preparedness and Response. This was in response to a request by the Government of Nigeria following an avian influenza outbreak detected in the country in early 2006. Nigeria was the first country in Africa to be affected by the H5N1 virus, with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks initially reported in the Kaduna State and confirmed by the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development on 8 February 2006. The disease spread rapidly to 97 Local Government Areas in 25 States and the Federal Capital Territory, and some 440,000 birds were culled in the first two months of the outbreak. The country subsequently suffered waves of HPAI outbreaks that peaked twice: in February 2006 and February 2007. The outbreaks affected 3037 farms causing 1.3 million of the country’s estimated 160 million birds to be destroyed, at a cost of USD 5.4 million paid in compensation by the Government. The last outbreak of the first wave of disease was recorded in the Anambra State in October 2007. The disease was again reported on two farms in July 2008 in Kano and Katsina States, and was quickly brought under control. The project development objectives were designed to support government efforts to minimize the threat posed by H5N1 to humans and the poultry industry, and prepare the necessary control measures to respond to a possible influenza pandemic. To achieve these objectives, the project supported three sets of interventions: (1) response and containment, (2) control and prevention and (3) preparedness and planning. The project had four components: (1) animal health, (2) human health, (3) social mobilization and strategic communication, and (4) project management and coordination. An implementation status and results report prepared in November 2010, and two implementation completion review reports, one by the project and the other by the World Bank, referred to the lack of an end-of-project impact assessment of the success or failure in meeting the intended project outcomes. It was against this backdrop that an independent impact assessment study was carried out with the objective of understanding better: how and, where possible, how much the project activities and outputs have contributed to the outcomes; and how the outcomes have contributed to the primary impacts of interest, namely, reducing the risk of HPAI to poultry and humans and improving public health preparedness for a pandemic. Nigeria  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2    Livestock  Brian Perry  Bernard Bett, Delia Grace, Ekanem Ekanem, Heather Hannah, Iheanacho Okike, Joerg Henning, Jane Poole, Mohamadou Fadiga, Christopher Chukwuka Molokwu, Pamela Pali, Paul Abdu, Thomas Randolph 
1202 Mission Project on Rainfed Agriculture:Bridging Yield Gaps through Science-led Interventions for Sustainable Use of Natural Resources in Karnataka International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-05-01  2013-04-30  The overall goal of the Mission is to make a difference in the lives of farmers in selected 20 districts of Karnataka through increasing average productivity of selected crops by 20% in four years. The specific objectives are: 1. To identify and scale-up best-bet options (soil, crop and water management) including improved cultivars to enhance productivity of the selected crops in selected 20 districts by 20%. 2. To train DoA staff in stratified soil sampling at villages, analysis of micronutrients, preparation of GIS-based soil maps, and guide DoA to establish high-quality Soil Analysis Laboratory at Bangalore. 3. To build capacity of the stake holders (farmers and consortium partners) in the sustainable management of natural resources and enhancing productivity in dryland areas. India      Crops, Land Management, Soils, Water Management  Suhas Wani   
1200 Implementation of 9 model watersheds projects in UP, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Kanataka, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-10-01  2014-09-30  The overall goal of this initiative is to improve the livelihoods of rural poor in fragile dryland areas on a sustainable basis by enhancing the impact of integrated watershed management programs in the country through capacity-building initiatives using model community watersheds as sites of learning in different agro-ecoregions The specific objectives are: To establish four Model  community watershed Sites of Learning in three target rainfall zones (<700 mm and 700  to 1100 mm, and > 1100 mm rainfall per annum) for demonstrating the potential of rainfed areas by adopting integrated water resource management approach;  and To disseminate best watershed management practices in the areas of integrated watershed management for developing capacity of different stakeholders.   India      Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Water Management  Suhas Wani   
1199 Food Facility Programme International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2010-11-03  2011-09-30  The overall objective of this project is to strengthen the capacity to produce higher and more stable grain yields of sorghum and pearl millet among poor rural households in West Africa. The project plans to contribute to this objective by (1) enhancing farmers’ and researchers’ skills and capacities in participatory testing and scaling up of crop pearl millet and sorghum crop intensification technologies (2) Increase farmer’s varietal options for sorghum and pearl millet (3) Develop training resources in a range of media forms for continued and large scale farmer, researcher, and development community capacity building (4) enhance researchers’ and development partners’ capacities to monitor outcomes and impacts (5) Strengthen Regional coordination and monitoring capacity with ECOWAS – CORAF (6) Enhance visibility of EU and CORAF and awareness of the vital role of sorghum and pearl millet production systems for food security, nutrition, and income. Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Niger, Senegal    INERA, Burkina Faso, Institut d’Economie Rural (IER)- Mali, Institut de Recherches Agronomiques du Niger (INRAN), Niger, Institut National de Recherche Agricole du Bénin (INRAB), Benin, Institut Sénégalais de Recherches Agricoles (ISRA), West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECARD)  Crops  E Weltzien   
1197 Tracking Change in Rural Poverty in Household and Village Economics in South Asia International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-05-01  2011-04-30  -     The project seeks to improve the quantity and quality of time-series meso- and micro-data so that decision-making is based on evidence on impacts on the poor.  The project is driven by three initiatives: the compilation of longitudinal household, individual, and field data over five years in 42 villages, the assembly of secondary meso-level agricultural data into integrated data bases for distribution, and the nurturing of policy and data analysis, and capacity building. This project is guided by over 30 years of previous work that establishes a basis for structuring partnerships to enhance sustainability, for assessing risk, and for innovating over time.  That experience shows that a large share of the benefits from the proposed work will accrue to society years after its projected completion.  Tracking poverty should be interpreted broadly as the proposal’s foci is on why and how changes in natural hazards, government programs, market prices, and institutions are mediated in village and district settings and affect the poor over time. Bangladesh, India    Centre for Policy Dialogue in Bangladesh, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), NARS  Policy & Institutions  MCS Bantilan  KPC Rao, Naveen Singh, K Parthasarathy Rao 
1158 Bioenergy in Africa – Jatropha World Agroforestry Centre  2010-12-21  2011-03-15  This project will gather the following information: 1. Potential supply of biofuels and feedback for domestic use and export 2. The economics of biofuel crops and their alternatives. 3. Strategies, plans, policies, investment programmes for biofuels development 4.Certification schemes and standards that apply to biofuels and their feedstocks. 5. A national transport fuels market. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-3    Crops, Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Miyuki Iiyama   
1157 Scaling Up Conservation Agriculture with Trees for Improved Livelihoods and Environmental Resilience in Eastern and Southern Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2010-12-10  2013-06-30  The overall objective of the project is to improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in Eastern and southern Africa while sustaining the natural resource base, by promoting the Conservation agriculture and Agroforestry practices. Its purpose is to build capacity of smallholder farmers in conservation agriculture and agroforestry practises for improved nutrition, household income and landscape health in Eastern and southern Africa. Participating countires are Tanzania, Kenya and Rwanda (East Africa) and Lesotho (Southern Africa) The Project's objectives shall include the following: (a) Baseline study- To establish current; agricultural production systems, , policy framework, and on-going programmes. The study will be the benchmark upon which the Evergreen Agriculture investment project will be evaluated; (b) Establishing sustainable tree seed/seedling supply systems by using the 'Rural Resource Center's approach; (c) Build the capacity of smallholder farmers and partners for effective adoption of Evergreen Agriculture practices; (d) Development of knowledge and information sharing products. Project activities include the following: 1. Perform participatory priority species settings for fertilizer and high-value trees together with farmers, extension officers, marketing experts and other key informants at each of the research sites. 2. Compile information about present and potentially suitable tree species for each of the sites with the help of information available from ICRAF Agroforestry databases, among other sources. 3. Select a set of at least 5 suitable fertilizer and 10 high-value tree species for each of the sites based on the ecological range of the species now and in the future, as well as on the most recent knowledge on species propagation and husbandry techniques, economic value, marketing potential, value adding possibilities and land health benefits of the species. 4. Assess the domestication status and potential improvement of each of the selected tree species by using a combination of measures such as literature review, provenance trials and participatory domestication techniques. 5. Establishment of RRCs and satellite community nurseries. 6. Establishment of field genebanks and motherblocks at each of the sites for providing and maintaining high quality propagation material of the target species 7. Perform a literature research on available knowledge about genetic diversity, G x E interactions and agronomy of the target species to help select suitable planting material for selected sites. 8. Document existing knowledge (including traditional one) of fertilizer tree seed sources and propagation techniques. 9. Test and improve propagation techniques in RRCs and satellite nurseries 10. Evaluate performance of seedlings in the nurseries and select the best provenances for propagation and dissemination. 11. Publish technical guidelines for fertilizer tree propagation. 12. Train trainers in nursery management (both technical and economical) and vegetative propagation; and use existing networks to disseminate technologies through farmer-tofarmer training. 13. Support for the establishment and strengthening of functional institutional and community based partnerships in target sites. 14. Develop and strengthen an iterative action research process that provides a framework for development of knowledge needed for scaling out/up Evergreen agriculture innovations as well as a participatory monitoring and evaluation process. 15. Establish partnerships for scaling up of Evergreen Agriculture practises. 16. Develop and operationalize knowledge management and communication strategy for CAWT. 17. Develop appropriate Knowledge and Information Sharing Products (KISP) for different stakeholder groups. 18. Conduct mid and end of project conferences to share results. 19. Prepare bulletins for different electronic media. 20. Establish a web page within the ICRAF and other partner organizations websites. The Project's outputs are as follows: (a) Baseline information on conservation agriculture and agroforestry in target areas established. (b) Sustainable tree seed and seedling supply systems developed and promoted. (c) Capacity of smallholder farmers and partners for effective adoption of Evergreen Agriculture practices built. (d) Iterative knowledge management and communication systems needed for scaling out/up of evergreen agriculture innovations developed, documented and disseminated. Kenya, Lesotho, Rwanda, Tanzania  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management, Market Access, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems  Jeremias Mowo  Jonathan Muriuki 
1155 Enabling Rural Transformation and Grass-roots Institution Building for Sustainable Land Management and Increased Incomes and Food Security World Agroforestry Centre  2010-12-16  2015-06-30  The goal of the Project is to foster support for grass-roots organizations to participate meaningfully in governance processes affecting their livelihoods and well-being, and the environment Project objectives are as follows: (a) to enhance the capacity of grass-roots institutions and support the harnessing of broader collective action for rural service delivery; (b) promote environmentally sustainable enterprise development and community-level asset accumulation; and (c) build a regional institutional change platform for knowledge sharing, scaling-up and representation or participation in sustainable land management (SLM) policymaking and development processes in East Africa linked to the IFAD Africa Knowledge Management Network. This project has three components namely: a) Enhance the capacity of grass-roots institutions and support the harnessing of broader collective action for rural service delivery; (b) Promote environmentally sustainable enterprise development and community-level asset accumulation; and (c) Build a regional institutional change platform for knowledge sharing, scaling up and participation in SLM policymaking and development processes in East Africa. Project outputs are as follows: (a) A dynamic model for grass-roots institutional analysis and strengthening and a platform for rural service delivery and engagement in policy process developed and promoted. This output will be achieved by analysing the typology of grass-roots institutions and their engagement in rural service delivery, policy dialogue; training farmers on various SLM technologies; supporting farming system improvement; and conducting small experiments on or testing promising technologies for enterprise development; and facilitating institutional development activities for socio-economic change. (b) Enterprise development and community-level asset accumulation increased. This output will be realized through the creation of district and national institutional change platforms with formalized rules of engagement in policy processes related to rural service delivery. The platforms will be enhanced by setting performance targets relating to transparency, accountability and participation. (c) Institutional change platform for knowledge sharing, scaling up and public-policy participation established. This output will include the development of knowledge products,a grass-roots institutional mobilization literacy programme, cross-site synthesis of grassroots institutions' engagement in policy processes related to rural service Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Agrobiodiversity, Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Jeremias Mowo  Delia Catacutan, Kenneth Masuki 
1154 NSF BREAD World Agroforestry Centre  2010-04-01  2013-03-31  This activity will look into Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils in Kenya. In paired experiments with at least three replicates per plot (where one soil receives biochalar amendments and the adjacent soil does not) Nitrous oxide, methane and carbon dioxide fluxes will be measured. These experiments will be done on two soils with widely differing chemical and physical properties (i.e clay content and SOM) to study the influence of soil characteristics on the emission of GHGs. Among other things, this project will engage in a study to address the resource and technology constraints of the region and further provide guidance on on-farm measurements, surveys, model development with a special focus on analyzing the cultural and institutional setting for acceptance of the stoves by the farmer population. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions, Soils  Henry Neufeldt   
1081 Analysis of supply constraints for enhancing meat and livestock exports from Ethiopia International Livestock Research Institute  2006-04-01  2007-06-30  This project investigates the reasons behind existing constraints in the supply of live animals for meat processing and export in Ethiopia. Based on this analysis, the study will give direction for appropriate policies aimed at improving the performance of Ethiopia’s domestic and export markets for live animals and meat. Objectives To review and synthesize literature on livestock and meat supply, consumption and trade in Ethiopia and identify information gaps for further research. To identify and map the export livestock supply shades and indicate volume of supply from major production areas. To assess current off-take rates for cattle and shoats in the highlands and pastoral lowlands and identify the characteristics of these animals. To assess the movement of animals and meat through domestic and export market chains, and how various market factors (price, market structure, marketing practices, transaction costs and market infrastructure) influence the movement of animals between market channels. To identify factors which affect the marketing behaviour of producers and other market participants. To develop alternative export scenarios for increased off-take through breeding, feeding management, disease control and producers’ marketing behaviour. To develop policy recommendations for investment in market development, development of quality and safety standards, extension, technology and dissemination of market information to achieve higher off-take rates and meat exports. Funding: United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through Texas A&M University Ethiopia  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)  Livestock, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Mohammad Jabbar   
1127 Bio-energy, sustainability and trade-offs: Can we aviod deforestation while promoting bio-energy? Center for International Forestry Research  2008-09-27  2012-09-26  The objective of this project is that To contribute to sustainable bioenergy development for the benefit of local people in developing countries, while minimising negative impacts on local environment and rural livelihoods, and contributing to global climate change mitigation. This will be achieved by producing and communicating relevant policy analyses about the effects of biofuels on forests and livelihoods for governments, and corporate and civil society decision making bodies. The two primary impacts expected from this project are: Local people in developing countries are benefiting from sustainable bioenergy development, planned and carried out in such a way that it minimises negative impacts on local livelihoods and the environment, and contributes to local income generation, livelihood improvement and to global climate change mitigation. National governments, civil society organisations and corporations in developing and developed countries having and are using better knowledge, information and tools for designing policies and programmes for sustainable forest-based bioenergy development Brazil, Cambodia, Congo Rep., Ethiopia, Indonesia, Laos, Philippines, Sudan, Vietnam  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-05    Climate Change, Forestry & Agroforestry  Krystof OBIDZINSKI  Markku Kanninen 
1123 Research to Support Design and Implementation Center for International Forestry Research  2008-06-01  2012-06-30  An expected outcome of this research is that the post 2012 climate regime is designed and national REDD schemes are constructed so that they use best available practices for managing, estimating and monitoring forest carbon pools in a way that leads to real reductions of emissions from deforestation and degradation. In addition, it is expected that reduced transaction costs will lead to increased adoption of REDD schemes. The project activities will be carried out by a number of partners with CIFOR taking a lead role. Overall coordination of the project will be carried out by CIFOR. Specifically CIFOR will: • coordinate the governance and activities of the project; • lead in the implementation of agreed research activities; • coordinate participation and inputs of state, private, civil society and local actors; • coordinate information dissemination; • prepare overall monitoring and evaluation reports for the project, and coordinate the independent evaluation at the end of the project; and • provide technical support linked to capacity building activities. Indonesia  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-01    Climate Change, Policy & Institutions  Louis Verchot  Daju Pradnja Resosudarmo, Levania Santoso, Markku Kanninen 
1121 Improving economic outcomes for smallholders growing teak in agroforestry systems in Indonesia Center for International Forestry Research  2007-01-01  2011-05-31  The research will look at ways in which producers can access market information and can overcome some of the transaction costs, both through group marketing arrangements and better quality control. Additional financial benefits could accrue to smallholder timber farmers if they could produce better quality timber and meet minimum diameter requirements. Below we make two cases for the research, firstly based just on the improved prices (as a result of the research) that should accrue to existing trees, and secondly on the longer-term improvements from the full gamut of research activities. Australia is an importer of teak furniture and Java is a key supplier. Putting the industry on a sound farm forestry trajectory will have downstream benefits for Australia. Indonesia      Agrobiodiversity, Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access  Dede Rohadi  Ani Nawir 
857 Knowledge to action: Enhancing traditional dairy value chains in Assam, India International Livestock Research Institute  2008-07-07  2009-06-30  The aim of this project is to create both demand for locally-produced, quality milk in Assam and capacity to supply it. This will be done through out-scaling of capacity-building methods and tools, and through up-scaling of policy processes of proven success in East Africa. These knowledge and policy inputs will help fill gaps identified in a recent comprehensive study carried out by ILRI and partners, where organized marketing of milk in Assam was found to be relatively insignificant and traditional (or informal) markets for fresh liquid milk and dairy products account for most of the market opportunities for farmers. Milk and milk products are consumed by most households, both rich and poor, and consumption is increasing; milk sales are an important livelihood strategy for rural households most of which are poor, and 82% of which keep cattle. Milk processing and trading provide a livelihood for large numbers of vendors and processors. Hence, enhancement of the traditional milk value chain can simultaneously improve the welfare of large numbers of poor farmers, intermediaries in the milk chain and consumers. Women have the major role in care of cattle and in making household decisions about purchase and consumption of dairy products; they will be the major beneficiaries of interventions at the start and end of the milk value chain. The study found that most urban consumers are not satisfied with milk quality and safety, while most producers and milk chain intermediaries are unaware of hygienic milk handling. The high costs of informality and poor linkages between actors further constrain dairy development. Moreover, given increased consumer demand for safer milk combined with potential regulations in the horizon aimed at mandating safety standards, informal sector participants’ livelihoods in the dairy sector are under increased threat. ANTICIPATED IMPACT It is anticipated that enhancing dairy quality and capability of supplying milk, while simultaneously improving linkages and decreasing transaction costs, will lead to a demand-driven production system which will further stimulate investment in production technologies (e.g. artificial insemination, feeding, credit and veterinary services) that are available but under-utilized. The initiative aims to overcome the above knowledge, policy and institutional barriers to improving the traditional milk marketing in Assam through two inter-linked strategies clustered around knowledge management (out-scaling) and policy engagement (up-scaling). The improvement is expected to result in significant livelihood benefits to those engaged in the value chain as more consumers purchase larger quantities of safer and higher quality milk, and farmers and traders see both their markets increase, costs decrease and losses from milk spoilage and wastage go down. EXPECTED OUTPUTS Out-scaling: Knowledge management and dissemination outputs Output 1: Training materials and tools from East Africa adapted to the Assamese context Output 2: A majority of milk value chain actors have improved skills and incentives for the practice of skills Output 3: Increased consumer demand for and confidence in milk quality and safety Up-scaling knowledge to action: Processes, policy and stakeholder engagement outputs Output 4: Evidence on impact and cost-effectiveness in order to promote continued and extended adoption Output 5: Attitudes, behaviour and institutions shifted toward pro-poor dairying PARTNERS Department of Dairy Development, Government of Assam College of Veterinary Sciences, Assam Agricultural University Centre for Humanistic Development Fellowship for Agri Resource Management and Entrepreneurship Research (FARMER) – a local NGO Brihattar Guwahati Gopalak Sangstha (BGGS) – a dairy producers’ and traders’ association Catalyst Management Services – a national-level NGO BASICS Limited – a national-level NGO Funding: UK Department for International Development (DFID) India  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2    Policy & Institutions  Delia Grace  Amos Omore, Derek Baker, Rameswar Deka, Steve Staal 
1084 Integrated crop production of bananas in Indonesia and Australia Bioversity International  2009-07-01  2013-06-30  Bananas and plantains (Musa) are grown in more than 120 countries throughout the tropics and subtropics, 85% of which are produced by small-scale farmers for home consumption or for sale in local and national markets. As such they sustain rural livelihoods and food security. Musa includes a wide range of types and cultivars, including cooking bananas, plantains and dessert bananas. Cooking banana and plantain provide a staple food for over 400 million people, with great importance in Sub-Saharan Africa. Fusarium wilt of banana (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc)) has widely been considered as one of the most devastating diseases in agricultural history, until resistant banana cultivars replaced susceptible ones in Central America. New outbreaks of the disease in Asia, caused by the highly virulent Foc Tropical race 4 (TR4), have raised concerns that the disease is once again threatening global banana production. Supported by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), the overall goal of the project is to improve the livelihoods of small-scale banana farmers in Indonesia and the income of banana producers in Australia by improving banana production practices, including the effective management of banana wilts. Best-bet farm management practices and integrated pest management (IPM) strategies are being piloted. Complementary studies to address knowledge gaps in relation to Fusarium wilt, especially TR4, are improving our understanding and ability to manage wilt diseases. Work focuses on Fusarium wilt and banana blood disease (Pseudomonas celebensi), respectively. Foc is devastating smallholder banana farms in Indonesia because of TR4, which overcomes resistance mechanisms demonstrated by Cavendish to other Fusarium races. In Australia Foc race 1 is a serious constraint to the production of Lady Finger, and as a new disease threat to Australian banana producers effective disease management strategies are required in order to avoid major income losses.  Mitigation of the threat posed by these diseases has also been the subject of two recent Bioversity/ACIAR projects, The project is coordinated by the Bioversity International Commodities for Livelihoods Program (CfLP) regional office for the Asia Pacific and implemented through national partners in Indonesia and Australia. Intended impacts include filling of knowledge gaps, community collaboration within Indonesian and Australian pilot communities, improved banana productivity and the stimulation of further research and development related to banana wilt diseases. By mid 2010 the project had clarified farmer practice and needs, selected appropriate pilot sites and farmer-participants, and developed: A list of potential IPM/ICM technologies and practices identified from previous researches such as technologies on seed systems, agronomic practices, cultivar options and mechanism of deployment A list of farmers’ knowledge and practices on IPM/ICM A consolidated report detailing the status of current knowledge regarding socio-demographic information, current status of disease management, and production systems in banana communities affected by Foc and BBD a hazard analysis tool and best management practice (BMP) guidelines from previous and current knowledge of banana wilt management a report detailing strategic research areas to be investigated by the project protocols in conducting research on suppressive soils, soil health and use of biological control agents Australia, Indonesia  2010-2012|Bioversity|BIOVERSITY-F03, 2010-2012|Bioversity|BIOVERSITY-F04  Gadjah Mada University, Indonesian Center for Horticulture Research and Development (ICHORD), Indonesian Tropical Fruit Research Institute (ITFRI), Queensland Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries (QDPI&F), State Department of Horticulture, Indonesia  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Seed Systems, Soils  Agustin Molina  Catur Hermanto, Usman Nurhadi, Jeff Daniells, Jum junidang, Tutik Setyawati, Susamto Somowiyarjo, Siti Subandiyah, Stewart Lindsay, Tommy Nugraha, Tony Pattison, Vida Grace Sinohin 
1082 Enabling livestock product exports from Ethiopia: Understanding the costs, sustainability and poverty reduction implications on sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) compliance International Livestock Research Institute  2006-10-01  2007-07-31  This project is aimed at understanding the demands associated with developing an internationally credible system for certifying Ethiopian livestock and meat exports. The key areas and research questions that this project seeks to address are as follows: What are the important sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) requirements, specifications and demands of targeted export markets at different junctures in the meat export supply chain? How is current compliance with these SPS requirements or other international standards achieved and, if not, what gaps remain? What specific risks and critical control points identified in the supply chain in Ethiopia need to be identified and improved to enhance livestock and livestock product exports? What options are available at each stage of the supply chain to facilitate identification, screening, testing, quarantine, vaccination, inspection, monitoring and other priority requirements from specified export markets? What are the costs of establishing an SPS certification system for livestock and meat exports? Who picks up these costs and along what part of the supply chain? How do these costs and the feasibility of establishing an SPS certification system differ by region? Could such a program be further scaled up? What are the modalities and policy options for funding an SPS certification system? Funding: United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through Texas A&M University Partner: Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Ethiopia  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2    Livestock, Market Access  Karl Rich  Asfaw Negassa, Brian Perry, Mohammad Jabbar, Simeon Kaitibie 
1080 People, animals and their zoonoses (PAZ) in Kenya International Livestock Research Institute  2009-01-01  2012-12-31  The 'People, Animals and their Zoonoses' (PAZ) project deals with zoonotic infections amongst livestock and the farmers who keep them. Zoonotic diseases are infections transmitted between animals and humans. The PAZ project addresses a set of hypotheses relating to endemic, neglected zoonoses in livestock and humans in East Africa, and the impact of co-factors (a condition that influences the effects of another condition) on the epidemiology of, and burden imposed by, these diseases. The major objectives are to demonstrate a relationship between co-factors and risk of infection, and to investigate whether interventions aimed at co-factors can affect the risk of infection with the zoonoses. Funding: The project is principally funded by the Wellcome Trust, with additional support from the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Kenya  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-3  Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), University of Edinburgh  Livestock  Eric Fevre   
1075 Financial costs of disease burden, morbidity and mortality from priority livestock diseases in Nigeria International Livestock Research Institute  2010-03-01  2010-09-01  The overall objective of this study is to assess the financial impacts of inaction against five priority diseases in Nigeria: Newcastle disease in rural poultry flocks; peste des petits ruminants in sheep and goats; contagious bovine pleuropneumonia in cattle; African swine fever in pigs; and trypanosomosis in ruminants and pigs. The specific objectives are to do the following for each of the five priority diseases at national and agroecological levels: assess the direct and indirect financial burden of inaction including costs of death of animals; weight loss; lost milk, eggs and draught power; treatment during illness etc.; estimate the costs of targeted interventions including treatment, vaccination, surveillance, vector control and sanitary measures; determine the additional benefits, additional costs and net benefits associated with baseline interventions; evaluate of the BCRs of targeted interventions based on sensitivity analysis; and make recommendations on the feasibility of the targeted interventions given the underlying uncertainties permeating the various scenarios. Funding: The World Bank Partner: University of Nigeria, Nsukka Nigeria  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2    Livestock  Iheanacho Okike  Christine Jost, Derek Baker, Mohamadou Fadiga 
870 Enhancing prevention and control of Rift Valley fever in East Africa by intersectoral assessment of control options International Livestock Research Institute  2010-06-01  2012-05-31  Many decisions on resource allocation and prioritization in disease control in the animal and human health sectors are influenced by economic arguments and evidence. Challenges in the effective control of zoonotic diseases (diseases transmissible between animals and humans) have forced the two sectors to rethink their approaches in favour of the multisectoral One Health approach. One Health places health issues in the broader developmental and ecological context, and can be defined as the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines to attain optimal health for people, animals and environment. The disciplines of public health and veterinary economics are yet to develop a satisfactory way of dealing with the economics of zoonoses to generate the much needed evidence to inform One Health decisions. Required evidence also includes distribution of control benefits and the institutional arrangements. This study is generating the evidence needed to inform One Health decisions through an intersectoral assessment of the cost-effectiveness and economic benefits of Rift Valley fever control options, by considering both human and animal health economics from a societal perspective. The study is also evaluating feasible operational frameworks based on the One Health approach. Specific objectives are to: identify and analyze stakeholders for prevention and control of zoonoses; identify and analyze suitable operational frameworks and coordination mechanisms for intersectoral planning within the One Health approach and their cost implications; identify alternate Rift Valley fever prevention and control strategies including One Health approaches; estimate the dual burden of Rift Valley fever epidemics in the human and animal health sectors; and assess the cost-effectiveness, cost and benefits of the alternate control options and prioritize them from a multisector perspective. This work is funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and is part of doctoral research by the principal investigator. Kenya    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Egerton University,Kenya, Swiss TPH (Swiss Tropical and Public Health), Switzerland  Livestock  Tabitha Kimani  Thomas Randolph 
1044 Strengthening Rural Institutions to Support Livelihood Security for Smallholders Involved in Industrial Treeplanting Programs in Vietnam and Indonesia Center for International Forestry Research  2008-01-01  2010-12-31  The project aims to advance livelihood security and sustainable reduction of poverty among rural smallholders involved in industrial tree-planting programs in Southeast Asia. The purpose is to strengthen rural institutions and promote innovative partnerships to increase productivity, profitability, and access to land, credit, and markets for smallholders participating in industrial tree-planting programs in Vietnam and Indonesia. Outputs will support improved governance of rural institutions, development of innovative partnerships, more effective planning and coordination, and enhanced market access for households and communities participating in industrial tree-planting initiatives in Vietnam and Indonesia. The project will have a particular focus on improving livelihood outcomes for the poor, marginalized groups, and women. The project will take a multi-disciplinary approach integrating a variety of methodologies for socio-economic, institutional and silvicultural analysis: • Participatory rapid appraisal (incl. structured/semi-structured key informant interviews); • Socio-economic surveys at the household and village levels; • Quantitative and qualitative surveys of plantation enterprises; • Pro-poor policy analysis; • Economic modeling of plantation cash flows; • Trade, investment, and policy scenario-building; • Forest mensuration and inventory techniques, and statistical analysis; • Application of SILVIA forest management planning system. Indonesia, Vietnam      Forestry & Agroforestry  Christopher Barr  Ahmad Dermawan, Rubeta Andriani 
1041 Mahogany and teak furniture: action research to improve value chain efficiency and enhance livelihoods Center for International Forestry Research  2008-06-01  2013-05-31  The project will produce the following outputs for the benefit of small-scale producers: (a) Identified inefficiencies of supply and value chains that lead to strategies to improve value chain efficiency and strengthen the furniture industry and (b) Strategies and actions to strengthen market engagement and position leading to enhanced value addition and capture of higher prices. The expected impacts are (a) Improved value chain efficiency and security for over 15,000 furniture enterprises (177,000 jobs); (b) Enhanced incomes for small-scale producers; (c) Greater role in the value chains for small-scale producers and their organisations. To avoid creating unhealthy power imbalances with tree growers, the project will work in close coordination with another ACIAR-CIFOR project that focuses on improving the livelihoods of tree growers. Indonesia  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-03    Agrobiodiversity, Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access  Herry Purnomo   
1039 Supporting Community forestry to improve livelihoods and to facilitate sustainable management of dry forests in Ethiopia Center for International Forestry Research  2009-05-27  2012-04-26  The project goal is to improved sustainable gum and resin extraction and commercialisation so that farmers will have economic incentives to sustainably manage the dry forests. The project purpose is to enhance uptake of technological and managerial practices, institutional innovations and policy recommendations by key stakeholders in the Ethiopian gum and resin industry, including players in poverty alleviation initiatives. The project outputs will include: technical measures and management practices that improve forest management and the quantity and quality of gums and resins produced by smallholders options to strengthen local gum and resin producer organizations and their ability to secure more favourable markets policy recommendations that ensure more secure access to forests, promote responsible gum and resin management, and enhance livelihood outcomes from gum and resin production. The proposed work focuses on local action for improving communities’ access to and benefit from dry forests. It brings the key issues from such action into the policy debate at regional, state and federal levels, facilitating informed decisions that will benefit poor farmers and women. Planners and policy makers lack field based information on how forestry can underpin poverty alleviation; the project will provide this information, illustrating that forests make a significant contribution to livelihood improvement and can help achieve the Millennium Development Goals. Ethiopia  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-03, 2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-06    Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions  Habtemariam Kassa   
1032 Providing long-term funding for ex situ collections of germplasm held by ICARDA International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-01-01  2011-12-31  Providing long-term funding for ex situ collections of germplasm held by ICARDA Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1    Agrobiodiversity  Ahmed Amri   
1031 Durable Rust Resistance in Wheat International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-02-01  2011-01-31  Tracking Wheat Rust Pathogens Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Crops  Kumarse Nazari   
1029 Durable Rust Resistance in Wheat – Spring Wheat International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-02-01  2011-01-31  Breeding (Conventional and Molecular) to Produce Rust Resistant Wheat Variteis Activities: Spring Wheat Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Crops  Osman Abdalla   
1028 Durable Rust Resistance in Wheat: Winter Wheat International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-02-01  2011-01-31  Breeding (Conventional and Molecular) to Produce Rust Resistant Wheat Varieties Activity: Winter Wheat Turkey  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Crops  Mesut Keser   
1027 Durable Rust Resistance in Wheat Durum Wheat International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-02-01  2011-01-31  Breeding (Conventional and Molecular) to Produce Rust Resistant Wheat Varieties Activity: Durum Wheat Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Crops  Miloudi nachit   
1026 Securing Some Key Biotic Stress Resistances in Wheat Varieties of Pakistan around Gene and Varietals Deployment Strategies with Emphasis on Recombination Breeding Aided by Molecular Technologies International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-05-29  2010-06-30  Securing Some Key Biotic Stress Resistances in Wheat Varieties of Pakistan around Gene and Varietals Deployment Strategies with Emphasis on Recombination Breeding Aided by Molecular Technologies Pakistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Crops  Abdul Majid   
1023 Development of New Pakistani Wheat Varieties Tolerant to Key Abiotic Stresses International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-05-29  2011-05-28  To increase crop production. This research project aims at enhancing the wheat production for self-reliance or export purposes and trengthening of wheat research system in the country. Through this project, focused integrated wheat research and production activities would be restructured that link goal oriented selected national programmes and exploit international linkages across multidisciplinary professional specialties. It will focus on exploiting novel genetic diversity via new technologies and use mplecular tools to ensure our national food security through varietial and gene deployment strategies Pakistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Crops  Abdul Majid   
1021 Rehabilitation, Conservation, and Promotion of Aromatic and Medicinal Plants (AMP) in the Matmata, South East Region of Tunisia International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-05-23  2010-12-31  2.1- Goal. The goal of the Project is to combat degradation of natural resources, and improve income of rural communi ties through rehabilitation, conservation and production diversification. 2.2- Objectives. The overall objective is to increase and diversify sources of income of women and men in the Project area through improved AMP productivity and market linkages Tunisia  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6    Ecosystem Management, Market Access  Mohammed Mourid   
1020 Soil Salinity Management in Central and Southern Iraq International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2010-12-05  2012-12-31  With the goal of better livelihoods through improved and sustainable use of available water and soil resources in central and southern Iraq, the proposed project aims to assess the drivers of salt distribution and soil and irrigation water salinity at different scales, and develop methodologies for salinity control and productivity enhancement. There are four project objectives: 1) Develop a robust conceptualization of salinization processes in central and southern Iraq based on information available on salinization at field and basin level and quantify salt and water fluxes and areas affected by salinity; 2)Determine appropriate strategic approaches to manage salinity that suit local environmental and socio-economic conditions; 3)Assessment of key productivity limitations and opportunities to wheat-based irrigated agricultural systems; 4)Develop investment options for ongoing salinity management in Iraq. With the goal of better livelihoods through improved and sustainable use of available water and soil resources in central and southern Iraq, the proposed project aims to assess the drivers of salt distribution and soil and irrigation water salinity at different scales, and develop methodologies for salinity control and productivity enhancement. A component funded through the Italian government will focus on Improving the livelihoods and welfare of poor farmers through sustainable management of salt-affected soils and water resources in the Al Nassiriah area of Iraq. There are four project objectives: 1) Develop a robust conceptualization of salinization processes in central and southern Iraq based on information available on salinization at field and basin level and quantify salt and water fluxes and areas affected by salinity; 2) Determine appropriate strategic approaches to manage salinity that suit local environmental and socio-economic conditions; 3) Assessment of key productivity limitations and opportunities to wheat-based irrigated agricultural systems; 4) Develop investment options for ongoing salinity management in Iraq. Iraq  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7    Climate Change, Crops, Land Management, Soils, Water Management  Manzoor Qadir   
770 Generating a framework for strategic improvement and adoption of superior dual-purpose (groundnut) cultivars in mixed crop livestock systems in drought prone areas. International Livestock Research Institute  2010-03-01  2011-09-01  The purpose of this study is to document and understand the impact, adoption and dissemination of the dual-purpose groundnut variety ICGV 91114 developed by ICRISAT and ILRI, thereby providing lessons for introduction and dissemination of new crop varieties in particular and improved technologies in general. Several aspects of this case make it a unique opportunity for learning. First is that it was the result of inter-institutional and cross-disciplinary collaboration (crops and livestock). Second, dissemination of the same technology occurred in different institutional contexts, which will allow us to test hypotheses about the impacts of institutions on innovation, adoption and impact. Finally, the multiple benefits of the technology – higher pod and fodder yields leading to improved milk yields – will vary between household types and locations as well as between household members, depending on the allocation of resources across households and of responsibilities within households, especially between men and women. India      Livestock, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems  Michael Blummel  Nils Teufel, Ruediger Korff 
1015 ADB RETA 6439 (12th Agriculture and Natural Resources Research at International Agricultural Research Centers) Enabling Policy Options for Sustainable Land Management in Central Asia, Pakistan and China (Adaptation to Climate Change in Central Asia and China). International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-07-01  2010-12-31  The long-term objective of the project is to contribute to improved soil and water management, increased agricultural productivity, and reduced poverty and malnutrition in the rural areas of CAand China. The immediate purpose is to help policy makers in the region identify and implement policies that will further this goal. The specific objectives of the research include the following: • to develop climate change scenarios for selected agro-ecosystems in the participating countries; • to assess the vulnerability of the selected agro-ecosystems to threat resulting from climate change particularly drought on the basis of the developed climate change scenarios in the study area; • to develop options and strategies to adapt to climate change so as build climate resilience in development planning in the target countries; • to strengthen the capacity to conduct socioeconomic and policy research related to sustainable land management in the region. Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions  Aden Aw-Hassan   
1014 Economic and Ecological Restructuring of Land- and Water Use in the Region Khorezm (Uzbekistan); a Pilot Project in Development Research (ZEF Khorezm Project) International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-01-01  2011-12-31   Unsustainable agricultural practices cause livelihood insecurity and environmental instability in the rural areas of Uzbekistan, Central Asia. Irrigated agricultural practices are not only at the root of land degradation and water insecurity, but the problems have extended beyond the agricultural sector and affecting overall life. Hence, increasing land and water productivity is a major pathway to sustainable development and poverty eradication. Since agriculture is a major driver of ecosystem change, there is an urgent need to translate research findings on the best land and water- use practices into action and application.  The ZEF/UNESCO project in Uzbekistan did not view water and land use separately but as integrated and closely linked elements of concern. Water is regarded thus not only as an input in irrigated agriculture, but as a resource for the entire livelihood systems that are part of agro-ecosystems and landscapes. As such, it provides multiple services and has many purposes. The overarching questions of this research for development project were to: · identify options (socio-economical and institutional innovations) that can sustainably improve land and water productivity to the benefit of peoples’ livelihood and the environment by minimizing or even reversing the loss of ecosystem services; · identify actions in which soil nutrients and organic matter dynamics lead to restoring soil fertility and link these to potential development options for the region; · develop adequate monitoring, impact assessment and decision-support methods with the use of modern tools such as GIS and remote sensing (RS); · improve human and institutional capacity to address these complex issues. These goals are in compliance with the Millennium Development Goals of eradicating poverty and hunger and achieving food and water security, but also with the United Nations conventions on desertification/land degradation and climate change as well as with the long-term strategic programs of the EU and Germany devised for Central Asia. Phase I (2002-2004) focused on the establishment of central databases and infrastructure and focused on analyzing data gaps. During Phase II (2004-2007), targeted field surveys and trials on alternative water and land use options, studies to increase the understanding of institutions and processes, and value chains of cotton and wheat underscoring were completed. During Phase III (2007-2011) an integrated concept was tested for restructuring land and water use on a landscape segment made available by the regional authorities. Evaluation and adaptation of innovations with relevant stakeholders (farmers, water managers, policy makers), the so-called Follow-the-Innovation (FTI) process, was an important component of Phase III. The scale of analyses of the project has been field, farm/household, water users association (watershed level) and basin. These levels were linked with GIS/RS tools and mathematical modeling. The project benefited from the approach of BMBF to commit itself for 10-12 year project duration. This approach allowed promoting an inter- and multi-disciplinary view and approach. The use of GIS, mathematical modeling, new analytical methods, and household surveys offered a spectrum of different solutions, which is more than what isolated projects usually can do. The extended time frame was also conducive for strategic capacity building. Since the onset of the project in 2002, 52 Ph.D. students, about half of them from Uzbekistan, have conducted their research in the framework of the project and 27 have successfully defended of which 11 from Uzbekistan (as of July 2011). Thesis findings were communicated in numerous manuscripts (see http://www.khorezm.zef.de). During field studies and surveys in Khorezm, Ph.D. candidates conducted not only their core research but also have supervised a large number of local M.Sc. (about 100) and B.Sc. students (about 90). However, the capacity building was not limited to people, but also involved institutions. The project works together with educational organizations such as state University of Urgench (UrDU) and contributed hardware (computers, printers, laboratory equipment), helped to develop and disseminate training and teaching materials and thus leveraged investments in capacity building.  Tasks to be addressed in the proposed final Phase IV (2012-2014) are the strengthening of human and institutional capacity, the transfer of research and management responsibilities to local partners and the completion of ongoing research that will fill existing knowledge gaps. But above all, the project will center on the dissemination of its innovations and translating project findings into action, by introducing them into national agricultural policies and sharing them with educational and research institutions. Uzbekistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7    Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Water Management  Dr. J.P.A. Lamers   
1013 Development of conservation cropping systems in the drylands of northern Iraq. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-07-01  2011-06-30  The project aims to increase crop productivity, profitability and sustainability in the dryland of northrn iraq through the department , valuation and promotion of conservation croping technologies involving zero-tillage ,stubble mulching, improved crop cultivate and better crop management. Iraq  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6    Crops  Colin Piggin   
1012 Consultant Services for the Rainfed Agriculture and Livestock Project (RALP). International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-10-01  2012-12-01  The Section's primary objective is to strengthen national seed systems by supporting both the formal (public and private) and informal seed sectors (farmer-based seed production) through:- designing alternative informal seed delivery systems for dry areas and for resource poor farmers to ensure availability and access to varieties and seeds.- supporting the public seed sector to become more effective and competitive and stimulating the private seed sector participation through networking, harmonization of regulations and policies. - conducting applied and adapted research on seed technology and seed supply to address seed system constraints - conducting capacity building for human resources to lead and manage national seed programs acquiring relevant expertise to meet the challenges of the changing seed industry. - maintaining and describing varieties and producing quality seed as service to NARS partners to ensure availability and access to early generation seed of new varieties r~ in partnership with NARS. Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6    Livestock, Water Management  Ahmed Amri   
1010 Sustainable Water Use Securing Food Production in Dry Areas of the Mediterranean Region. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-07-01  2012-06-30  1-Use of saline water for evaluating the growth potential of food legume crops (chickpea, faba bean and lentil) 2- environmental impact assessment of using marginal-quality water in selected sites; 3- documentation and dissemination of the project -led results. Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Turkey, West Bank and Gaza  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7    Climate Change, Crops, Water Management  Manzoor Qadir   
1009 Improved Livelihoods of Small Producers in Iraq through Integrated Pest Management and Organic Fertilization. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-11-06  2012-12-31  The overal goal of the progamme is to improve livelihoods and empower small farmers by promoting sustinable agricultural production system in Iraq and building the capacities of local communities and agricultural development institutions. Iraq  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6    Agrobiodiversity, Policy & Institutions  Kamel Shideed   
1008 Integrating rainwater harvesting in the agricultural systems for improved productivity in Great Jamahirya. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-01-01  2013-12-31  1) Enhance ARC's capacity and relations with regional and international centers to be on a par with advanced research institutions; 2) Enable ARC to benefit through ICARDA from experiences at other CGIAR Centers in priority areas for AI-Jamahirya; 3) Enhance the cooperation between ARC and ICARDA in the area of sustainable agricultural development for food security in AI-Jamahirya. Libya  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7  ARC  Policy & Institutions  Theib Oweis   
1007 Integrated improvement of cereal-based cropping systems in rainfed and irrigated areas of Great Jamahirya International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-01-01  2013-12-31  1) Enhance ARC's capacity and relations with regional and international centers to be on a par with advanced research institutions; 2) Enable ARC to benefit through ICARDA from experiences at other CGIAR Centers in priority areas for AI-Jamahirya; 3) Enhance the cooperation between ARC and ICARDA in the area of sustainable agricultural development for food security in AI-Jamahirya. Libya  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+3  ARC  Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Richard Brettell   
1006 Improvement of small ruminants productivity in Great Jumhuriya International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-01-01  2013-12-31  1) Enhance ARC's capacity and relations with regional and international centers to be on a par with advanced research institutions 2) Enable ARC to benefit through ICARDA from experiences at other CGIAR Centers in priority areas for AI-Jamahirya 3) Enhance the cooperation between ARC and ICARDA in the area of sustainable agricultural development for food security in AI-Jamahirya. Libya  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6  ARC  Policy & Institutions  Barbara Ann Rischkowsky   
1005 ICARDA-CIMMYT Wheat Improvement Program (ICWIP). International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-01-01  2010-12-31  The goal is : Improved livelihoods of resource poor farmers in dry areas. Algeria, Cyprus, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, West Bank and Gaza  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Policy & Institutions  Richard Brettell   
1004 Project 8: Poverty and Livelihood Analysis and Impact Assessment.The goal is :sustinable improvement of the welfare of poor people in dry areas. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-01-01  2010-12-31  The goal is: Sustainable improvement of the welfare of poor people in dry areas. Algeria, Cyprus, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, West Bank and Gaza  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management  Kamel Shideed   
1003 Breeder friendly high-throughput phenotyping tools to select for wheat adaptive traits in drought-prone environments International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-11-01  2011-10-21  The objectives are the following: 1. Develop and validate a field-based, low-cost, high throughput phenotyping system to assess crop water status, canopy size and functionality, with the purpose of estimating patterns of crop water use on a seasonal basis, while monitoring other major crop developmental traits. 2. Assess the relative impact of putative key traits on drought adaptation by comparing related lines contrasting in trait value in different drough mega-environments. Target traits will be transpiration efficiency, tillering, stem water soluble carbohydrates (WSC), early vigour, stay green and flowering. 3. Apply findings 1 and 2 to guide characterization of the combination of traits behind ICARDA lines known for their high performance under drought. All project lines will be genotyped using SSR markers from the GCP genetics diversity kit. 4. Build capability in non-invasive phenotyping methods related to drought tolerant traits and the estimated value of different traits Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Crops, Water Management  Francis Ogbonnaya   
1002 Because Gender Matters: Strengthening Social and Gender Analysis in ENRM in the Middle East and North Africa. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-03-22  2013-03-21  The objective of this project is to build capacity and generate innovative practices and methods that demonstrate the added value of social and gender analysis (SA/GA) methods in action oriented and trans formative research. Egypt, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+4, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8    Agrobiodiversity  Aden Aw-Hassan   
1000 Accelerating seed multiplication to combat the threat of stem rust in wheat. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-09-01  2011-10-30  1.Accelerating pre-release seed  multiplication of stem rust resistant varieties: Breeder seed. 2.Accelerating pre-release seed multiplication of stem rust resistant varieties: Pre-basic see; establish on-farm demonstration trials. 3. Accelerating pre-release seed multiplication 0f stem rust resistant varieties:Basic/foundation; establish on-farm demonstration trials. 4. Accelerating large-scale certified seed multiplication of Stem Rust Resistant Varieties Public or Private sector; establish on-farm demonstration trials. 5. Distributing small seed pack of new rust resistanat wheat varieties to small farmers Egypt, Ethiopia, Pakistan, Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|ICARDA-SWEP, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Crops, Seed Systems  Ahmed Amri   
998 Unlocking the potential of rainfed agriculture in Ethiopia for improved rural livelihoods (UNPRA Ethiopia). International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-06-01  2012-05-31  Unlocking the potential of rainfed agriculture in Ethiopia for improved rural livelihoods (UNPRA Ethiopia) Ethiopia  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change  Theib Oweis  Theib Oweis 
993 Post-Doc Fellow in Development of conservation agriculture technologies for adoption by smallholders in Central Asia International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-07-01  2012-06-30  The aim of this project is to improve resource use efficiency and rural livelihoods in the five countries of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan), through the adoption by farmers of conservation agricultural technologies that support crop diversification and sustainable nutrient management. The project purpose is to translate standard principles of conservation agriculture into feasible technologies that can be adopted by small farms in the region and match small farmers' financial resources and operational skills. Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan      Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Christopher Martius   
992 Desertification Mitigation and Remediation of Land (DESIRE) International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-01-01  2012-12-31  Tunisia  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+3, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6    Land Management  Mohammed Mourid   
990 Increasing Food and Nutritional Security in Afghanistan through Crop Diversification of Wheat Based Cropping Systems International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-05-15  2011-06-30  Goal: The overall project goal is to increase the food security of poor, rural households and to reduce malnutrition, especially among women and children through the promotion of legume production. Objectives: The project objectives are to undertake applied and participatory adaptive research on selected high yielding food legume varieties, taking into account the biophysical and socio-economic circumstances in the country, as a basis to then develop appropriate agricultural technological packages for wide dissemination and subsequent adoption by Afghan farmers. The focus shall be on documenting and demonstrating the value of legume production in terms of soil fertilization and of legume consumption in terms of nutritional value. Afghanistan      Crops  Javed Rizvi   
989 Safe and Productive Use of Urban Wastewater in Agriculture in Jordan, Palestine, and Lebanon International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-06-01  2011-05-31  With the goal of better livelihoods through improved and sustainable use of available water resources in dry areas, the proposed project aims to address improvement in greywater quality and community-based interventions leading to safe and productive use of greywater for crop production systems at household level. Jordan, Lebanon  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7    Water Management  Manzoor Qadir  Manzoor Qadir 
988 Improving Community Livelihoods by Implementing Water Harvesting and Soil Conservation techniques in the Mountains of Afrin, Aleppo Province, Syria International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-06-01  2011-05-31  The Goal and the objectives is to improve the livelihood and use of water resources of farming communities in the mountainous areas of Afrin district. Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+7    Soils, Water Management  Feras Ziadat   
987 Technical assistance on the development of the Qatar National Food Security Policy (QNFSP). International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-05-01  2010-03-31  Goal 1. to validate that the land survey has  been undertaken in accordance with enternationally accepted standards for soil mapping, lassification and land evaluation. Goal 2. To build upon this data foundation in order to asses and quantify the the biophysical potential for local food and feed production in Qatar. Qatar  2010-2012|ICRISAT|ICRISAT-2, 2010-2012|ICRISAT|ICRISAT-3, 2010-2012|ICRISAT|ICRISAT-4, 2010-2012|ICRISAT|ICRISAT-6, 2010-2012|ICRISAT|ICRISAT-7, 2010-2012|ICRISAT|ICRISAT-8    Policy & Institutions  Kamel Shideed   
986 Improving Livelihoods of Small Farmers and Rural Women through Value-added Processing and Export of Cashmere, Wool and Mohair. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-07-28  2013-09-30  Goal. The Project's goal is to improve the livelihoods and income of small livestock producers and rural women through improved production, processing and export of value-added fibre in producing areas of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. (a) Enhance knowledge and information of women's groups to enable them to make informed decisions; (b) Improve fibre quality through the introduction of breeding programs, genetics and collaborative breeding strategies; (c) Improve fibre quality and market value through sorting, grading and pricing fibre according to international standards; (d) Increase local, value-added processing through new technologies, design and product development to benefit rural women; (e) Open new markets for value-added fibre and fibre products by linking producers and processors to export markets and facilitating access of foreign buyers to regional markets; and (f) Increase stakeholders' income through the establishment of sustainable market chains at pilot sites." Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6    Livestock, Market Access  Barbara Ann Rischkowsky   
985 Cooperation with Vermont University: Sunn Pest Biocontrol International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  1998-01-01  2010-12-31  Determine the efficacy and persistence of formulated entomopathogenic fungi for management of Sunn Pest in overwintering sites in the Middle East. 2. Assess granular formulations of entomopathogenic fungi against Sunn Pest adults in field borders when they first arrive at the beginning of the wheat growing season. 3. Assist in the total program to expand implementation of integrated pest management of Sunn Pest throughout the affected region. Bahrain, Djibouti, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1, 2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Moustafa Bohssini   
984 Enhancing Livelihoods of Poor Livestock Keepers through Increased Use of Fodder in Syria International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2006-06-01  2011-03-03  The project seeks to strengthen the capacity of poor livestock keepers to select and adopt fodder options and access market opportunities to enable them to improve their livelihoods and the sustainability of their farming systems through a multi-institutional effort implemented in the context of the System-wide Livestock Programme. Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+6  International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)  Livestock  Asamoah Larbi   
982 Monitoring and resistance of wheat black stem rust in Arab countries International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-05-07  2010-12-31  Goal: Enhance wheat production stability and sustainability through avoidance or mitigation of disease epidemic caused by trans-boundary rust diseases Purpose: Establish effective monitoring and early warning system for trans-boundary rust diseases, accelerate development and release of resistant varieties, and develop rapid seed dissemination program for replacement of varieties Specific Activities: 1.1 Assemble and test targeted rust trap nurseries at rust hot spots (stem, yellow and leaf rusts) in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Yemen 1.2 Ensure the sustainability of rust surveillance and collaboration through trained scientists in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Yemen 2.1 Establish race analysis at key laboratories in Egypt, and Saudi Arabia 2.2 Assess effectiveness of resistance genes and virulence changes in prevalent rust pathogens 3.1 Assess crop losses 3.2 Develop GIS maps of major rust pathways. Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2  International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Kumarse Nazari  Amor Yahyaoui 
981 Commodity Chain Analysis for Selected Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (MAPs) in the NENA Region International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-10-09  2010-10-31  To undertake commodity chain analysis for selected MAPs with comparative advantage and potential to benefit the small growers/collectors in the NENA region. Algeria, Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+8    Policy & Institutions  Aden Aw-Hassan   
980 Integrated Watershed Development for Food Security and Sustainable Improvement of Livelihood in Barani, Pakistan (FoodWADI) International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-01-01  2010-12-31  To develop, demonstrate, and evaluate innovative and cost-effective technologies and methodologies for efficient monitoring and use of available water and land resources for crop-livestock improvement and sustainable land management. Pakistan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1  University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU)  Agrobiodiversity, Water Management  Theib Oweis   
978 Beypazari rooftop water harvesting project International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-05-01  2010-10-31  The project is designed to improve domestic water supply through rainwater harvesting; the primary beneficiaries will be the local populations in Beypazan. The project, conceived as a partnership initiative, is to involve institutions, organizations and individuals currently active in rainwater harvesting in the region. Other beneficiaries include the general public through awareness raising, partner institutes through capacity building and society in general through best water management practices and introduction of a culture where rainwater harvesting is an acceptable and widely used practice. Turkey  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1    Agrobiodiversity, Water Management  Theib Oweis   
977 Biotechnology development in the Arab World: Establishment of a containment facility at ICARDA. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-07-08  2010-12-31  Goal: To improve food security and biosafety in Arab countries using biotechnologies that improve the effciency and effectiveness of national crop improvement programs. Objective: To develop the physical infrastructure at ICARDA that will allow testing of genetically modified stress tolerant plants in the Arab world. Algeria, Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Agrobiodiversity  Michael Baum   
975 Fair Access and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources: National Policy Development (Jordan) International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-10-17  2011-07-31  To raise awareness among and empower farmers regarding their voices and rights n policies and laws related to genetic resources. To get participatory plant breeding products recognized legally and properly valued economically. To change policies and laws concerning variety release and seed production in support of participatory plant breeding practices and its products. Overall objective: To develop new policies and laws that recognize and suppor the key contributions of rural people to the processes of sustainable genetic resources management and improvement, dynamic biodiversity conservation, and rural innovation. The overall objective is to develop new policies and laws that recognize and support the key contributions of rural people to the processes of sustainable genetic resources management and improvement, dynamic biodiversity conservation, and rural innovation. Additional objectives include: To raise awareness among and empower farmers regarding their voices and rights n policies and laws related to genetic resources. To get participatory plant breeding products recognized legally and properly valued economically. To change policies and laws concerning variety release and seed production in support of participatory plant breeding practices and its products . Jordan  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2    Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems  Stefania Grando  Salvatore Ceccarelli 
974 Developing drought and heat tolerant wheat germplasm and its utilisation for the drylands of Central and West Asia and North Africa International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2008-01-01  2011-12-31  To enhance the tolerance of wheat to drought and heat in the Mediterranean region in order to improve wheat productivity in the dryland and reduce risks in unfavorable agricultural environments. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of drought and heat response in wheat germplasm under controlled and field conditions. Algeria, Cyprus, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Turkey    International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Michael Baum   
971 Integrated Pest Management in the Cereal/Food Legumes Cropping System: Research and Human Capacity Building International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-10-01  2011-10-01  Algeria, Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+4  Syrian Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform  Agrobiodiversity, Crops  Michael Baum   
972 Assessment of multiple-use forest management systems- Congo Basin Center for International Forestry Research  2009-10-01  2010-01-31  To carry out a regional assessment of Forest Multiple Use Systems in the Congo Basin. The study is part of the CIRAD, CIFOR and FAO initiative on “Tropical forests for livelihoods: a cross-continental assessment for better informing multiple use management approaches Cameroon, Congo Dem. Rep., Gabon  2010-2012|CIFOR|CIFOR-06  Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD)  Forestry & Agroforestry  Guillaume Lescuyer   
970 Gender, tenure and community forests in Uganda and Nicaragua Center for International Forestry Research  2010-01-01  2013-12-31  The overall goal of this research project is to improve women’s tenure rights to forests through their increased participation in community forest user groups with regard both to decision making and livelihood benefits. The purpose of the project is to enhance stakeholder uptake of institutional and policy innovations to promote women’s participation, specifically regarding the way in which community forestry-related decisions include women and reflect their particular interests. These innovations will be based on a clear understanding of the obstacles to, and the motivations and conditions for, the emergence of mixed user groups and women in positions of authority over natural resources. Nicaragua, Uganda      Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions  Esther Mwangi  Anne Larson 
969 Plant Genetic Resource Conservation, Documentation and Utilization in Central Asia and the Caucasus International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2004-07-01  2011-12-31  "The overall aim of the project is to achieve long-term security of the agro-biodiversity existing in the CAC region. The specific objectives are as follows: Objective 1: Consolidate the development of a long-term regional capacity to collect, conserve, document, utilize and exchange PGR in accordance with their obligations as signatories to the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Objective 2: Identify and assemble national base collections of seed for field crop species. Objective 3: Consolidate the development of a comprehensive national and regional PGR information system that will allow 1) PGR workers to collect, acquire, conserve and document national PGR collections more efficiently and 2) plant breeders to more efficiently utilize PGR from the region. Objective 4: Compile detailed information surfaces that characterizes the environments from which PGR have been collected in the CAC region. Objective 5,6,7 " Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan      Agrobiodiversity  Kenneth Street   
968 Design and validation of a crop registry model for priority collections and collections in common under the project -Collective Action for the Rehabilitation of Global Public Goods in the CGIAR Genetic Resources System: Phase 2 International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-01-01  2010-03-01  This project will focus on genebank upgrading for barley, chickpea, faba bean, wheat, forages, and lentil. This phase will address forages and cleaning the collections from seed-borne viruses and diseases. The introduction of a barcoding system will further improve the quality and effectiveness of genebank operations. The upgrading of the current herbarium will facilitate forage species identification and will allow for its full exploitation in training the NARS staff. The following activities will be completed in this project: 1. Removal of backlogs in the processing of accessions into storage. 2. Upgrading of equipment and systems and removal of backlogs in regeneration, characterization, health and viability testing, and documentation and supply Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+2  International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)  Agrobiodiversity, Seed Systems  Jan Konopka   
967 CYCLER-Support on: “Supporting the implementation of FP6 research activities related to waste water use and recycling by using new generation greenhouse systems, adapted to the requirements of the MED partner countries” International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2006-09-29  2008-09-28  The scarcity of water and the resulting competition between agriculture, households, and industry present serious problems for Mediterranean countries. FP6 is the European Community Framework Programe for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration. It is a reflection of the actions at EU level to fund and promote research. These programs have focused on activities that promote the more efficient use of water resources. The objectives of this project are: 1. Completing a detailed CYCLER-SUPPORT study, which focuses on waste water recycling and reuse through new generation greenhouse systems that are adapted to the requirements of Mediterranean partner countries (MPC). 2. Disseminating existing knowledge of research in this field through the organization of a workshop 3. Increasing exchanges of information between EU and MPC scientists. 4. Supporting the establishment of sustainable business relations. Algeria, Cyprus, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, West Bank and Gaza  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1  Institut Agronomique et Vétérinaire (IAV) of Morocco  Water Management  Mohammed Mourid   
966 Updated Collaboration Agreement for Strengthening Agricultural Research International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-01-01  2011-12-31  The main objectives of this challenge program is to bring together scientists, decision makers and other stakeholders to develop relevant strategies and measures for safeguarding a sustainable trend of agricultural products, food security. Iran      Policy & Institutions  Ahmed Amri   
965 Combating Dryland Degradation – Oasis International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-10-01  2010-12-31  Syrian Arab Republic  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+1    Agrobiodiversity, Climate Change, Land Management  Kamel Shideed   
962 Enabling Stakeholders in Moroccan Coastal Management to Develop Sustainable Climate Change Adaptation Policies and Plans International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-03-28  2010-08-28  The aim of this project is to develop capacity for, and contribute to, policy and decision-making for strategic coastal land use planning and management, to reduce the vulnerability of coastal communities to the impacts of sea level rise, coastal flooding, and extreme weather events. ENFI will implement the project in Morocco, while ICARDA will be the administrator through its regional office in Tunisia. Specific objectives will include the following: 1. An assessment including the vulnerability and socio-economic impact of climate change, which has resulted in rising sea levels, coastal flooding, and extreme weather. 2. The development of adaptation strategies and coastal policy land use guidelines that reduce coastal population vulnerability and optimize the socio-economic and political trade offs for different stakeholders. 3. Capacity development for local stakeholders Morocco  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+3  Ecole National de l’Agriculture, Maroc  Climate Change, Policy & Institutions  Mohammed Mourid   
959 Programme for Technology Transfer to Enhance Livelihoods and Natural Resource Management in the Arabian Peninsula. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2007-12-31  2012-12-31  "this project will test, evaluat and disseminate improved technology packages that increase crop and livestock production and productivity, increase water use efficiency and conserve range land resources it will enhance the capacity of national research and extension programmes to promote the adoption of the targeted technologies and enhanced communication among various stakeholders" Testing, evaluating and disseminating improved technology packages that increase crop and livestock production and prductivity, increase water use efficiency and conserve rangeland resources enhancing the capacity of national research and extension programmes to promote the adoption of the targeted technologies and enhanced communication among various stakeholders Saudi Arabia  2010-2012|ICARDA|PROJECT+4  NARS  Livestock, Water Management  Ahmed Tawfik Moustafa   
317 Improving Heat Tolerance in Chickpea for Mitigating Impacts of Climate Change on its productivity International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-01-01  2013-01-01  Chickpea is a cool season food legume and incurs heavy yield losses when exposed to high temperatures at reproductive stage. Heat stress at reproductive stage is increasingly becoming a serious constraint to chickpea production because of large shift in chickpea area from the cooler, long season environments to warm, short-season environments, increase in area under late sown conditions, and reduction in winter period and expected increase in temperatures due to climate change. This projects aims at understanding mechanisms and genetics of heat tolerance in chickpea and develop breeding lines with improved heat tolerance. Heat tolerant cultivars will be more resilient to the impacts of climate change, allow flexibility in sowing dates and enhance opportunities for expanding chickpea area in new niches and cropping systems, such as rice-fallows.This project is aimed at (1) developing techniques for effective screening of chickpea genotypes for heat tolerance at reproductive stage, (2) identifying chickpea genotypes with reproductive stage heat tolerance, (2) understanding mechanisms and genetics of heat tolerance, (3) identifying molecular markers for gene(s) controlling heat tolerance, (4) introgressing heat tolerance in selected cultivars/elite breeding lines, and (5) evaluating selected heat tolerant lines at farmers fields. The breeding material developed in this project will be further evaluated by the partner institutes and others, leading to development of heat tolerant cultivars Outputs expected from the project are, techniques standardized for screening chickpea genotypes for reproductive stage heat tolerance, a set of heat tolerant chickpea genotypes identified and selected lines evaluated at farmers’ fields, genetics of heat tolerance worked out and molecular markers identified for heat tolerance gene(s), and breeding material developed by introgressing heat tolerance in locally adopted cultivars.Activities include, standardize techniques for large scale screening of chickpea germplasm for heat stress at reproductive stage, screen a set of genotypes (germplasm, cultivars and breeding lines) at multiple locations for their ability to flower and set pods at high temperatures, study reproductive behavior of heat tolerant and heat sensitive genotypes under normal temperatures and under heat stress, study genetics of heat tolerance, develop RILs for mapping heat tolerance gene(s), identify molecular markers for heat tolerance gene(s) through association mapping and linkage mapping, develop heat tolerant breeding lines with suitable agronomic background, and evaluate selected heat tolerant lines at farmers’ fields.  Expansion of project to involve marker-assisted breeding for heat tolerance planned, if able to identify markers for heat tolerance under the current project, and studies on comparative genomics of legumes for heat tolerance. India    Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University, RARS-Nandyal, Andhra Pradesh, India, Indian Institute of Pulses Research, Jawaharlal Nehru Agricultural University, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India, Panjab University, Chandigarh  Climate Change, Crops  Pooran Gaur  CLL Gowda, L Krishnamurthy, Nalini Mallikarjuna, Rajeev Varshney 
900 Human capacity development project in agriculture for Afghanistan International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2009-04-01  2014-03-03  The objective is the further capacity development of government officials and researchers who are engaged in agricultural development in Afghanistan. Capacity development will take the form of crop, seed, and an animal production training courses. The objective is the further capacity development of government officials and researchers who are engaged in agricultural development in Afghanistan. Capacity development will take the form of crop, seed, and an animal production training courses. Afghanistan      Crops, Livestock, Seed Systems  Kamel Shideed   
802 Competing for Water: Understanding conflict and cooperation in local water governance International Water Management Institute  2007-04-01  2010-09-30  Local water governance conflicts and cooperation will be studied in Namwala District, Zambia, for comparison with similar studies in Nicaragua, Bolivia, Mali and Vietnam. In June 2007 a global workshop was organized with project partners, where generic concepts and methodologies were specified. In August 2007, the Zambian national Working Group will be established to ensure upscaling of findings at national level. An inception workshop will be organized with this Working Group and other strategic key stake holders, followed by a field visit by the Zambian team. IWMI provides backstopping on local and national water policies and laws, and social science research methodologies. Zambia      Water Management  Barbara Van Koppen  Barbara Van Koppen 
801 A Novel Reuse-Oriented Approach to Improving the Long-term operation of sanitation facilities in Ghana International Water Management Institute  2010-08-01  2013-07-31  The project aims at improving the public health and environmental integrity in urban and peri-urban Ghana through the provision of reliable and complete sanitation which will lead to reduced incidence of waterborne diseases, improved access to complete sanitation and increased volume of treated wastewater and faecal sludge. In addition, the increased reuse of treated effluent and nutrients will improve the preparedness of sanitation systems towards climate variability through reduced pressure on limited freshwater resources. Ghana    Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science and Technology (KNUST), University of California at Berkeley, Water Resources Commission  Water Management  Pay Dreschel  Ben Keraita, Liqa Raschid, Pay Dreschel 
800 Volta 4:Integrated management of rainwater and small reservoirs for multiple uses – Sub-basin management and governance International Water Management Institute  2010-10-01  2013-12-31  This project aims at understanding the processes that govern IWRM policy-making, practices and research in the Volta Basin (Ghana and Burkina Faso). This will be done to identify demand-driven opportunities for the management and the governance of rainwater and small reservoirs at the watershed (sub-basin) level. The project will make use of tools and results of previous CPWF projects so as to devise and assess the prospects offered by a participatory modeling framework, designed and discussed in multi-stakeholder platforms (MSP), to steer IWRM practices in two pilot watersheds. The participatory modeling framework will integrate expert biophysical modeling with locally-defined understanding of the socio-environmental system. This will provide the basis for identifying desirable rainwater and small reservoirs governance options at the watershed level. Participatory action-research will foster discussion of IWRM principles and policies and enhance better knowledge on the ways policy and development interventions are shaped by local actors. This will provide the basis to fin-tune IWRM policy processes to local needs and demands. Participatory approaches will be combined with a critical assessment of the theory and practice of natural resources policy making and research activities. We will draw from the fields of Political Ecology and Science and Technology Studies to better understand local dynamics and appropriation pathways of innovations such as IWRM policy interventions. By going beyond the simplistic –yet commonly admitted- divide between formal decision making and informal practices, this research project will lead to enhance impacts of on-going IWRM policy initiatives in the Volta basin. Burkina Faso, Ghana    Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD)  Water Management  Jean-Philippe Venot  Eline Boelee, Fred Kizito, Jean-Philippe Venot, Katherine Snyder 
798 Enhancing adaptive capacity to Climate Change impacts through well-managed water use for aquaculture integrated with small-scale irrigation in the Chinyanja Triangle, Africa International Water Management Institute  2010-04-01  2013-03-31  The main purpose of the project is to enhance the benefits of integrating aquaculture and small scale irrigation by reducing conflicts over water use and improving capacity for adapting to drought and flood occurrences that are expected to be more frequent in the face of climate change. IWMI, with help from NARS partners, will work on the components of regional water resources assessment and hydrological modeling for both current situations and the future trends as impacted by climate change. Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia    WorldFish Center  Climate Change  Xueliang Cai  CT Hoanh, Solomon Seyoum, Xueliang Cai 
797 Capacity building in Integrated River Basin Management for higher Education Institutes to support emerging River Basin Organizations International Water Management Institute  2009-11-01  2012-12-31  The water sector in Ethiopia is undergoing rapid change. New institutional arrangements are being developed and of particular note is the integrated management of water and environmental resources through River Basin Organisations. The programme proposed here aims to strengthen the capacity required to implement such a process. Through the programme the Consortium intends to develop partnership between the academic institutions and the water sector. Hence, it is expected that information and knowledge can be delivered not only for fostering the necessary capacity for water sector reform, but also to trigger the innovation required in the process of the establishment of new institutional arrangements. Ethiopia    Addis Ababa University, Arba Minch University, Ethiopia, UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education  Water Management  Seleshi Bekele  Matthew McCartney, Seleshi Bekele, Solomon Seyoum 
703 Building REDD Capacity for Developing Country Negotiators and Land Managers – Phase II. World Agroforestry Centre  2010-08-01  2011-05-31  This project is supported by NORAD – the Norwegian Agency for Development Co-operation and aims  to support climate change negotiators and land managers in developing countries to negotiate for effective and fair international and national-level policies for Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD-plus). Several meetings and training workshops have been held with the target audience in Africa and Asia. Four workshops took place in 2009-2010. The workshops in November 2009 were focused on the upcoming UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen (UNFCCC COP15), while the March 2010 workshops focused on assessing the COP15 outcomes and developing strategies for moving forward. The two workshops in Kenya included participants from 15 African countries, and the two workshops in Vietnam included participants from 8 Asian countries. The second phase of the project started in January 2011 with a REDD Development Dividend Task Force meeting in Manila, Philippines where 15 experts drawn from Philippines, Indonesia, Cambodia, Nepal, Costa Rica, Paraguay, Brazil, Cameroon, Ghana and United States explored i) how countries can strengthen the Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) process for REDD and ii) co-benefits derived from the REDD process and effective benefit sharing mechanisms. Read related article Following up on the REDD taskforce meeting, two training workshops were held in May 2011 in Cameroon and Vietnam. Over 120 government negotiators, land managers, representatives of non-government organizations and climate change scientists enhanced their understanding and skills on technical issues relating to the REDD+ implementation process. Country experiences enriched the training which focused on MRV and safeguards. Read related material A South-South exchange web platform has been developed for building capacity for REDD+ negotiators and stakeholders in Africa and Asia. All  materials, presentations and other updates rom the meetings and workshops can be accessed on the ASB-ICRAF and IISD platform. The project is implemented by ASB Partnership for the Tropical Forest Margins in collaboration with the International Institute for Sustainable Development. Cameroon, Vietnam  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-7    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions  Peter Minang   
712 Promoting Development of Economically Viable Rubber Smallholdings in West Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2009-06-19  2013-06-18  The main objective of the project is to enhance economically viable rubber cultivation in smallholdings through:- planting of good quality planting materials of high yielding clones; reduction of immaturity period; successful integration of high value arable crops with rubber thus providing sustainable income for smallholder during the immature phase; and diversification of income base and integrating high value agro-forestry tree crops and medicinal plants in rubber farming systems during the mature phase. The project shall comprise of the following components and activities to be undertaken by the Rubber Institute of Nigeria (RRIN). Component 1: Production and distribution of planting materials of high yielding rubber clones from the Central Nursery located at (RRIN). Objective: To produce sufficient quality planting materials of high yielding rubber clones to meet requirements of farmers for replanting and new planting over the next 4 years. Outputs: Upgraded RRIN central nursery with required infrastructure. Adoption of best agronomic practices; adequate bud stick up production of selected high yielding clones in bud wood gardens to meet production target and reduced cost of production of budded stump through improved efficiency and high productivity. Component 2: To establish Model Smallholder farms in four traditional rubber growing states of Southern Nigeria and in a non-traditional state with integration of high value economic crops during the immature phase. Objective: To demonstrate that high value arable crops can be successfully integrated with rubber thus providing sustainable income for the farmer during the immature phase. Outputs: Model farms established in Edo, Delta, Cross river, Ogun or Akwa/bom states (traditional rubber zone) and Kaduna (non- traditional); schedule of agronomic inputs with regard to fertilization, pest and disease management and pruning practices to be carried out annually in all model farm; harvesting of high value arable crops, records of harvest and income received from sale; annual growth increment data of young rubber trees and model farms as demonstration centres. Component 3: Enhancing the incomes of rubber smallholders in the traditional rubber growing states of Edo, delta, Cross River, Ogun or Akwa/bom. Objective: Demonstrate diversification of income base through integration of non-rubber farming activities during mature phase in model farms. Outputs: Successful integration of shade tolerant medicinal/herbal plants and mini livestock under mature rubber; increased yeild per year from rubber; achievement of better farm gate price for value addition activity and realization of higher income by farmers from diversified activities. Component 4: Establishing rubber based agro-forestry farming systems in abandoned traditional rubber area (Otua) Nigeria. Objective: To demonstrate successful integration of high value agro-forestry tree crops and medicinal plants in rubber based farming systems through modified planting system in model farms. Outputs: Production of planting materials of domesticated high value agro-forestry tree crops; peripheral planting of bush mango (Irvengia gabonesis), bitter cola (Garcinia Kola), Cola nuts (Cola acucuminae), African Plum (Dacryodis edulis) and Allanblackia floribunda; planting of cassava, pineapple, cocoyam, maize and melon in the interrows during the first three years of the immature phase. Model farms as demonstration centres for information dissemination. Component 5: Training of Extension Officers and participatory training programs for smallholders on various technologies to smallholders. Objective: To enhance effectiveness of extension officers through capacity building for successful transfer of relevant technology to smallholders. Outputs: Implementation of training programs on: nursery practices, agronomic practices, during immature phase, management of pests and diseases, exploitation systems and value addition of rubber; agro-forestry crops, cash crops suitable for integration with rubber and high value medicinal/herbal plants; relevant technologies at various sites by extension officers of RRIN and resource persons from the provate sector. Implementation of Workshops on major diseases and rubber effluent management by International experts in respective fields and formation of an industry-RRIN consultative committee and a National trabsfer if technology commitee. Component 6: Dissemination Objective: To promote uptake of project results throughout Africa. Outputs: Reports on best practices and success stories; dissemination workshop and creation of a website where project results and experiences can be accessed. Nigeria  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-3  Rubber Research Institute of Nigeria (RRIN)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access, Seed Systems  Zac Tchoundjeu  Asaah Ebenezer 
708 Livestock and livelihoods: Improving market participation of small-scale livestock producers International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2006-11-01  2010-12-31  This project aims at improving market participation of smallholder goat and cattle keepers in semi-arid areas of Mozambique, Namibia and Zimbabwe. The key objective of the project is to shift small-scale livestock producers from extensive production practices towards more commercially-oriented, intensive practices. This can be accomplished by linking extension and input delivery more directly with marketing strategies. The specific project objectives are to: improve market participation of small-scale goat and cattle keepers in semi-arid regions of Mozambique, Namibia and Zimbabwe; evaluate constraints to and opportunities for commercialization of smallholder production of goats and cattle; test and evaluate alternative livestock marketing and input delivery systems; assess the impact of market-led technology change on household incomes; and establish an effective communication strategy to facilitate networking and exchange of information among sector stakeholders. This project is funded by the European Union (EU) through the ICART project (Implementation and Coordination of Agricultural Research and Training). Mozambique, Namibia, Zimbabwe  2010-2012|ICRISAT|ICRISAT-1, 2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-1, 2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Matopos Research Institute, Zimbabwe, Namibian National Farmers Union (NNFU)  Livestock, Market Access  Andre Van Rooyen  Ade Freeman, Andrew Mude, Derek Baker, Isabelle Baltenweck, Nelson Mango, Simeon Kaitibie, Siboniso Moyo 
711 Promoting Rural Innovations through Participatory Tree Domestication in West and Central Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2008-11-27  2011-11-26  The Goal of the programme is increased rural household income and the measurable impact on farmers livelihoods through uptake of participatory tree domestication in West and Central Africa. This programme shall target smallholder farmers who have the highest potential for kick-starting and supporting self-sustained growth and employment in rural areas. This programme has four main components. These are as follows. 1. Increase Uptake of Tree Domestication through mechanisms and policies for improved propagation,integration and marketing of agroforestry tree products( AFTPs). This component seeks to develop and disseminate techniques, mechanisms and policies that allow farmers to improve the propagation, inntegration and marketing of AFTPs. 2. Enable rural actors to adapt and disseminate tree domestication through targeted tools, methods and training. This component focuses on building human capacities in order to generate and use the knowledge & skills. Its activities will centre on the development of knowledge-based networks for learning and organisational reinforcement of programme partners. 3. Communication and partnerships for dissemination of TD technologies. This component of the Programme aims at further developing effective communication to bilateral and multilateral institutions, civil society and governmental structures at local, national and intemationallevels. 4. Design and Implement a systematic monitoring and evaluation strategy. Monitoring & Evaluation is an intrinsic part of this programme because the strategy to be put in place will not only allow to measure Programme progress and steer implementation, but also keep track of the changes tree domestication brings about in farmers' livelihoods (income, nutrition, health, education,) and at community as well as landscape level (environment, institutions, networks). The objectives of this programme are as follows. 1.Promote tree domestication in a broadened scope which encourages rural innovation. In continuing to disseminate and support tree domestication processes at grassroots level, the programme will empower stakeholders (and especially the poor) to become agents of change in their society. 2. Enable rural actors to adapt and disseminate tree domestication in order to improve farmers' livelihoods. This entails the development of knowledge-based networks or partnerships for learning as well as institutional and organisational reinforcement. The challenge is to help grassroots partners acquire technical skills and become active players locally. 3. Effectively communicate the contribution of tree domestication to poverty alleviation. The communication strategy will continue to target bilateral and multilateral institutions, the civil society and government structures at local, national and international levels. The strategy will seek to transform tree domestication from a mere technical entry point into an effective pro-poor welfare improvement mechanism. 4. Design and implement a monitoring and evaluation strategy that enables to keep track document and provide feedback on programme management, the extent of tree domestication uptake and its impacts at farmer/household, village and landscape levels. Monitoring and evaluation will also allow the programme to assess the strengths and weaknesses of its dissemination approaches. The programme will deliver the following outputs 1. Increased uptake of participatory tree domestication through: (i) improved access to high quality germplasm at affordable prices; (ii) better tools and methods to assist tree integration decision making; (iii) efficient and timely AFTP market information system run by stakeholders; ( iv) formalised agreements between producers and private sector for sales and processing of AFTP; and (v) improved measures to accelerate adoption; 2. Adaptable tools, methods and training material to strengthen the capacities of rural actors in tree domestication; 3. Effective and timely communication channels to support tree domestication technology dissemination; and 4. An M&E strategy that keep track of progress made, and provides feedback for enhanced results and impact on target groups at the various levels (farmer, household, village and landscape). Cameroon, Congo Dem. Rep., Nigeria  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-3    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Zac Tchoundjeu  Anne Degrande 
706 Livestock data innovation in Africa International Livestock Research Institute  2010-07-01  2013-06-30  The aim of this project is to improve the quality of data on livestock in Africa to enhance the understanding of the roles of livestock in poverty reduction. The key objective of the project is to develop a development communications approach towards data review/collection/analysis of livestock data in selected African countries which guides better decision-making and investment to support livelihood improvement among smallholder livestock producers. Project activities focus on identifying pro-poor livestock initiatives which benefit households who can potentially serve local and growing markets for animal protein products. The project targets: a broader understanding of the importance of livestock to poverty reduction at the household level and identification of entry points for reducing poverty; the identification and analysis of market sheds, in particular ‘hot-spots’ of demand for livestock  products and the identification of opportunities for market participation for smallholders; analysis of constraints facing livestock-holding smallholders; stakeholder identification of critical data gaps, opportunities for addressing these gaps and the creation of an enabling environment through enhancing data collection and analytical abilities at a local level; and effective dissemination of project results with the objective of developing data platforms and national commitment to data collection/analysis. Niger, Tanzania, Uganda  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  African Union, Inter-African Bureau of Animal Resources, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), World Bank  Livestock, Market Access  Derek Baker  Steve Staal 
699 Increasing Benefits to Smallholder Farmers From Improved Soil Fertility through Integration of Pigeon Peas, Groundnuts and Conservation Agriculture in Maize Production Systems of Malawi World Agroforestry Centre  2010-01-01  2012-12-31  This project examines the effects of combinations of different forms of conservation agriculture used by partners and integrated with fertilizer trees on maize performance, and hence it will demonstrate the effects of conservation agriculture with trees (CAWT) on maize based systems. The following are the key research questions in this project: 1. Which form of CAWT with fertilizer trees can improve maize productivity and other benefits? 2. Does a combination of conservation agriculture and fertilizer tree have a synergistic effect on maize productivity? 3. What components of conservation agriculture with trees do smallholder farmers most prefer? Project objectives include the following: 1. Provide technical backstopping on agroforestry and CAWT related technologies for integration in the smallholder production systems 2. Identify suitable tree species and develop nurseries for seeds and seedlings production 3. Train extension staff and lead farmers in best fit CAWT practices 4. Document and disseminate information widely generated on CAWT. Specific obligations of ICRAF • ICRAF will provide technical backstopping on CAWT related technologies for integration in the smallholder production systems • ICRAF will identify suitable tree species and encourage tree nurseries for seeds and seedlings production • ICRAF will train extension staff and lead farmers in best fit Conservation Agriculture with Trees practices Project Outputs • Knowledge on best-bet CAWT generated and applied; • Suitable tree species for CAWT identified and germplasm available • Capacity of extension and partner staff built • Information on CAWT documented and disseminated Project Outcome 1. Knowledge of farmers and partners on the practice of CAWT increased 2. Increased availability and use of quality tree germplasm for CAWT 3. Increased capacity of extension staff 4. Evidence-based information on CAWT available Malawi    DARS, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Forestry & Agroforestry, Seed Systems, Soils  Festus Akinnifesi   
695 Establishment of Ten Pond Systems World Agroforestry Centre  2010-09-01  2010-12-31  This initiative is directed at reducing rural poverty and is working towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, especially MDG1. It aims to enhance food security and improve access to services, such as extension services, for example, which will ultimately benefit the target communities  through improved yields. Women and other marginal groups will be empowered and effectively involved in matters that affect their livelihoods. The project will work with specific government departments and decentralized structures to support capacity building activities. It will provide development initiatives with and for the extremely poor population, and work towards the creation of a suitable environment to encourage where possible, private and public investment in agriculture. It will guide target communities to understand how to access basic services and take control of resources to improve their livelihoods in a sustainable manner. The project will focus on the extremely poor and most vulnerable households to ensure interventions are responsive and build on the existing capacities/strengths. It will ensure that women participate fully in all aspects of the project, particularly in terms of problem solving and decision making. A mainstreaming response to HIV and AIDS, gender, equality and disaster risk reduction (DRR) will be undertaken within this programme. The action will promote interaction between state and non-state actors involved in the programme cycle. It will work with non-state actors/civil society organisations (Community Based Organisations, Farmers’ Associations, Self-Help Groups and Local NGOs among others). These non-state actors will be supported through capacity building initiatives to understand the roles and responsibilities of newly decentralised government structures. They will be empowered to actively participate in development planning and decision making processes at different levels ensuring that the public needs are prioritised and necessary resources allocated accordingly. Non-state actors will also play key role in the monitoring and evaluation of development initiatives. Burundi      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Policy & Institutions  Malesu Maimbo  Alex Oduor, Cherogony Kipruto 
692 ICRAF/COMART FOUDATION – WEST KENYA PROJECT World Agroforestry Centre  2010-09-06  2011-09-05  According to the needs of each area, this project will undertake the following activities with community groups in lower and Middle Nyando Blocs. 1. Setting up tree nurseries with a planned production of 30,000 seedlings for four (4) groups each in 2010. 2. Rehabilitation of small gullies and surrounding degraded areas through tree planting and zerograzing. 3. Agroforestry and coffee production -introducing 'shade' trees in the coffee farms in the upper portions of the river basins. 4. Assessing Soil and Water (S&W) conservation measures and rehabilitating existing structures with special emphasis on indigenous trees. 5. Implementing soil and water conservation in areas with no previous activities and which are at high risk for erosion. We will target the mid- and foot-slopes through contour planting. Preferred species should be improved fallows such as Sesbania sesban and Gliricidia sepium. 6. Large scale tree planting on slopes. 7. River bank protection and promotion of indigenous species to plant along the river banks. 8. Integration of fodder banks in S&W conservation. Using questionnares, this project will obtain qualitative and quantitative data on farmer perceptions of the interventions. This exercise will explore the expectations of the planned interventions as well as try to understand what they would be willing to pay for the interventions. At the end of the two year period, this project will look at a similar set of questions to evaluate the changes in farmer perceptions and their willingness to pay. The expectation is that the value of the interventions can be estimated which is necessary for upscaling and turning them sustainable (from a business perspectIve). Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-5    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Forestry & Agroforestry, Seed Systems, Soils, Water Management  Henry Neufeldt   
693 Improving the competitiveness of pig production in an adjusting Vietnam market International Livestock Research Institute  2007-04-01  2010-10-01  This project seeks to identify an appropriate policy and technology framework and forms of market and institution coordination that will allow smallholder pig producers in Vietnam to competitively raise their incomes through better access to higher value market chains. Demand for pork is increasing rapidly in Vietnam due to growth in incomes and urban populations. Pork consumers are also demanding better product quality. A dual market structure is emerging, involving a few large-scale farms using higher yielding technology packages and a large number of smallholders using less sophisticated systems. Given widespread rural poverty in Vietnam, successful commercial smallholder pig farming alongside the large-scale pig industry may serve as a vehicle for poverty alleviation if pragmatic options can be identified about the technology, institutional arrangements and policy support needed to improve the access of poorer producers to quality inputs and services. Various formal and informal market arrangements involving input suppliers, marketing and processing firms and pig raisers are evolving. However, it is still unclear which institutional framework is best suited to increase smallholder access to high-value market chains. Specific objectives Establish empirically the level of market demand for commercial and traditional quality attributes of pork in Vietnam, characterize these attributes and validate any associated significant price differentials and their determinants. Compare input and output marketing arrangements between smallholder pig-raisers selling into high- and low-priced markets. Characterize the structure and conduct of the input- and service-providing firms and pig markets. Compare the geographical distribution of and access to inputs and services by different types of pig producers. Identify smallholder constraints to entry into higher value market chains. Assess the potential impact of selected institutional, technology and policy options for increasing the access of smallholder pig producers to improved inputs and services, and high-value supply chains. Promote awareness and uptake of the pro-poor policy, institutional and investment options emerging from the project among stakeholders, decision makers, investors and market actors in the pig industry in Vietnam. Anticipated outcomes Evidence of the extent of demand for pork with better traditional quality attributes. Mapped locations of higher-and lower-priced pig value chains and market actors. Knowledge about the characteristics of pig producers selling in higher- and lower-priced markets. Knowledge about contractual arrangements and marketing systems for inputs and products, and the relative market power of input and service providers. Knowledge about the potential impact of policy interventions to improve smallholder market access. A strategy for pilot testing of a set of recommended options by development and/or private-sector partners in Vietnam. Funder: Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research Partners Institute of Policy and Strategy for Agricultural and Rural Development (IPSARD) International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Oxfam The University of Queensland Vietnam      Livestock  Lucy Lapar  Delia Grace, Karl Rich, Steve Staal 
690 Improving the quality of pearl millet residues for livestock International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2004-04-01  2010-12-31  The  proposal addresses improvement of animal productivity in crop-livestock systems in India, using marker-assisted and conventional plant breeding to genetically increase the nutritive value of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) stover, the major component of ruminant diets in the production systems in the targeted research domain.The goal is to improve smallholder livestock production in arid and semi-arid production systems in India through the use of pearl millet hybrids with better inherent stover quality. The first project objective is to produce pearl millet hybrid parent lines with enhanced stover quality suitable for use in commercial hybrid seed production, by first identifying flanking markers for additional quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for stover quality traits known to predict animal performance with a high degree of accuracy, then transferring these to several selected hybrid seed parent maintainer lines by marker-assisted backcrossing. The second project objective is to determine the effects of individual stover quality QTLs, and combinations, in enhanced commercial hybrid parents, on in vitro stover quality and in vivo animal production. The final objective is to promote the use of improved parental lines to public and private seed companies. India    International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)  Crops, Livestock  C Tom Hash  Michael Blummel 
689 Ecosystem approaches to the better management of zoonotic emerging infectious diseases in the Southeast Asia region (EcoZD) International Livestock Research Institute  2008-02-01  2013-07-31  This project, Ecosystem Approaches to the Better Management of Zoonotic Emerging Infectious Diseases in the Southeast Asia Region, or EcoZD for short, is linking, working with, and building capacity in multi-disciplinary research groups in six pilot countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Thailand, Viet Nam and China (Yunnan Province). ILRI is coordinating the set of pilot research projects in these countries, facilitating learning across the projects, and helping translate the knowledge gained into feasible policies and actions. EcoZD supports all costs related to research studies undertaken in this project. During the project’s preparatory phase (mid-2009), national researchers are working with relevant decision-makers in disease control as well as with local communities. ILRI and its technical partners support the research teams from the design phase of their studies to their final communications in such formats as policy briefs, conference presentations and peer-reviewed articles.To complement existing projects in the Southeast Asia region on emerging infectious diseases, EcoZD may support research into endemic or neglected, as well as emerging, zoonoses if the former are deemed high-priority issues by national decision-makers and local communities. Partners EcoZD links the national research teams in each of its six pilot countries through regular workshops and virtual work spaces and discussion forums. Regional networking is enhanced by close links to the Asian Partnership on Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (APEIR), the Mekong Basin Disease Surveillance network (MBDS) and other relevant bodies and sectors (for example, agriculture, land use, conservation). In terms of technical inputs, ILRI is providing expertise in animal health, veterinary public health, risk assessment, geographic information systems, modelling and socioeconomics. MBDS and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (formerly Swiss Tropical Institute) are providing the project with their public health expertise. APEIR researchers are in a position to provide valuable local knowledge in respect to animal health, public health, & socio-economics; Veterinarians Without Borders–Canada is providing expertise in ecohealth approaches. Expected outputs Tools, methods, approaches and lessons used or generated and found useful by EcoZD will be disseminated to South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa to support development of similar projects in these regions. Funding: International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2    Livestock  Delia Grace  Fred Unger, Jeffrey Gilbert, John McDermott, Korapin Tohtubtiang, Lucy Lapar, Purvi Mehta, Rainer Asse 
687 Improving postrainy sorghum varieties to meet the growing grain and fodder demand in India International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2008-07-07  2012-06-06  Postrainy season (Rabi) sorghum, although grown on residual soil moisture and commonly exposed to terminal drought stress, has an excellent market potential, for its high quality of grain and stover.For Rabi sorghum, genetically improving the efficiency of using stored soil moisture, by maximizing post-anthesis water use and water use efficiency (WUE) to enhance grain filling, is a prime target to maximize grain/stover production and quality. One major objective is to develop single- and multiple-QTLs stay-green introgression isolines, and assess the contributions of each of these QTLs to grain/fodder productivity and grain/fodder quality under both drought-stressed and non-stressed conditions. A second objective is to identify, via crop simulation modeling, the traits contributing to a better use of the soil profile moisture, and assess their putative links to individual stay-green QTLs and potential impact on overall productivity of mixed crop livestock systems of drought-prone areas of India. Planned outputs of this project is (i) isolines with key stay-green QTLs having higher drought-adaptation and forage quality and better characterized molecular markers to facilitate MAS breeding; (ii) knowledge of traits related to a more efficient soil water use and their effects on yield, strategic knowledge on their relation to key stay-green QTLs, and assessment of their forecasted economic benefits. India    International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), National Research Centre for Sorghum(NRCS),India, Queensland Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries (QDPI&F)  Crops, Livestock  Vincent Vadez  C Tom Hash, Michael Blummel, K Parthasarathy Rao 
680 Appropriate property rights for customary use zones of local communities and indigenous people in Cameroon. In Mali, Elaboration et diffusion d’un document d’orientation sur les conventions locales World Agroforestry Centre  2010-05-01  2010-12-31  In this project, ICRAF will have 2 engagements in Cameroon and Mali as follows: Cameroon- appropriate property rights for customary use zones of local communities and indiginous people in Cameroon. The objective of this project is to ensure that implementing texts for forestry laws pertaining to forest reserves and parks and forest management units explicitly and/or implicitly recognize or enshrine the rights of local communities and indigenous groups. Key project activities include the following: 1. Participatory mapping to restitute and secure community rights. 2. Studies to draw up communities for negotiation and advocacy processes. 3. Documentation of claims and propositions of communities in the target area. 4. Capacity building for comunities for negotiation and advocacy processes 5. National workshop: Contact/meetings with local officials and traditional chiefs and mobilization of strategic actors. With time and among other outcomes, this project expects that this activity in synergy with other coalition members works, the policy makers will start with other policy shapers and opinion leaders on communities practical needs with regards to land and tree tenures. Mali- Elaboration et diffusion d'un document d'orientation sur les conventions locales. The objective of this study is to create tools for formulating and omplementing local conventions, to enable better natural resource management in Mali and in the Sahelian subregion. Cameroon, Mali  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2    Forestry & Agroforestry, Policy & Institutions  Zac Tchoundjeu  Antoine Kalinganire, Serge Ngendakumana 
678 Japan Capacity Building Program for African Agricultural Researchers World Agroforestry Centre  2010-09-26  2010-10-16  In this program, ICRAF is implementing a training programme on the Japan Capacity Building program for African Agricultural Researchers for Fiscal Year 2010. The title of the training is: Transfering skills to develop and apply soio-economic assessment tools for sustainable land management projects. Miyuki Iiyama (ICRAF) has been collaborating with researchers of ISAR (Institut des Science Agronomique du Rwanda) on Sustainable Land Management (SLM) project in Rwanda, which aims at the national capacity building of disseminating and up-scaling sustainable land management, including radical and progressive terraces. This training aims at developing capacity of Rwandese researchers • to design protocols for cost-benefit analysis and valuations of eco-system services • to apply the tools for data collection, analyses, and compilation • to develop user-friendly manuals to further disseminate and upscale the system of knowledge to wider national stakeholders. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-6    Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Miyuki Iiyama   
676 Towards projecting Land Use Impacts on Carbon Stocks and Soil Health in Kenya using Standardized Field Measurement Protocols and Satellite Image Analysis World Agroforestry Centre  2010-07-01  2011-09-30  The potential for landscape size payment for ecosystem services to directly influence poverty reduction in rural communities has been recognized for sometime now. However implementation of such a scheme has been hindered by a lack of adequate comparative empirical data for these areas. This project seeks to change this through further development of a scientific approach and comparative analytical assessment of data collected from both arid and semi arid lands (ASAL) of Laikipia district in Kenya and higher potential agricultural land in Kenya's rift valley province. Field data and samples will be collected from two 100 sq km sentinel sites situated in high agricultural potential areas. The data will be analyzed and compared with existing data and samples taken from two similar sites, situated in the ASAL of Laikipia. Using satellite technology, undertaking soil carbon stable isotope analyses and examining historical data the analysis will provide detailed assessments of the impacts of land use change on carbon status, and overall soil and ecosystem health of these landscapes. The project will develop a theoretical framework for projecting land use impacts on carbon stock changes and other ecosystem benefits that can be initialized and run from empirical data collected in the field and available satellite imagery. This research will enable credible assessment of existing carbon stocks, provide project developers with reduced monitoring and evaluation costs, provide project financiers with credible and proven carbon/ecosystem resource credits, and offer added value to community implementation in programs to enhance the environment. Project outputs are as follows: 1. A scientific report giving (i) a theoretical framework for projecting land use impacts on carbon stock changes and other ecosystem benefits that can be initialized and run from empirical data collected in the field and available satellite imagery (ii) illustration of the approach using data from four 100 km2 sentinel sites, two in pastoralist areas and two in agricultural areas. Geo-referenced databases on carbon stocks and soil health for four sentinel sites in Kenya. 2. Two Kenyan field teams fully trained in the Land Degradation Surveillance framework field protocols. Ten Kenyan scientists trained in data management and statistical analysis techniques for carbon and soil health measurement and monitoring. Training materials in statistical analysis of soil carbon and health data with worked examples. Kenya  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-4    Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management, Soils  Keith Shepherd   
675 Mobilisation and Empowerment of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises Involved in the Non-Timber Forest Products in Central Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2010-01-01  2010-12-31  The Congo Basin, which is the world’s second largest forest massif after the Amazon, harbours several millions of animal and vegetal species. More than one hundred millions of people rely on the on forest resources for their living, health, cultural needs and their income. The commercialization of Non Timber Forest Products (NTFP)is an activity that provides considerable income to populations, and women particularly. NTFP are forest products other than timber and include fruits, leaves, nuts, barks and bush meat. Studies have shown that the Small and Medium Size Forest Companies (SMFC) involved in the non-timber forest products (NTFP) constitute the main source of income for millions of poor people in the world: 1. 80-90% of companies in developing countries are SMFCs 2. Over 50% of all jobs within the forest sector are provided by SMFCs 3. More than 20 millions people hold direct jobs in SMFCs (140 millions, statistically) 4. Over USD $ 130 billions per year of gross added-value are yield by SMFCs in the world. This project aims at increasing the rural populations' revenues, through empowerment in terms of entrepreneurship, and sustainable management of natural resources in a favourable institutional environment. Project activities are as follows: 1. Business plan of nurseries on the pilot sites 2. Creating and strengthening the nurseries on the pilot sites 3. Developing the integration of improved plants in the existing agroforestry systems 4. Initiating trainings in PFNL domestication on the new pilot sites in the Far-North, the North and the North-West 5. Follow-up of the constructed nurseries 6. Training in domestication and construction of nurseries The expected outcome is as follows: 1. The empowerment of small and medium size forest production companies is enhanced 2. The priority branches of the non-timber forest products (NTFP) sector is developed 3. The techniques for a sustainable management of NTFP are reinforced, notably those for harvest and domestication 4.The institutional and legal frameworks are adapted to the functioning of NTFP actors in Central Africa. Cameroon, Congo Dem. Rep.  2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-1, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-2, 2010-2012|ICRAF|ICRAF-3    Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems  Zac Tchoundjeu  Anne Degrande 
662 Building livelihoods resilience to alleviate poverty in semi-arid areas of West Africa International Livestock Research Institute  2009-07-01  2013-06-30  Vulnerability is a major characteristic of livelihoods in semi-arid zones of sub-Saharan Africa due to a wide range of critical and interlocking ecological and socioeconomic factors. Household and community resilience can be strengthened through broad-based agricultural intensification that creates employment along value chains that meet growing local demand. Smallholder adoption of intensification strategies is constrained, however, by their inability to bear risk associated with the investments required, which is compounded by ecological and market variability. This action-research project, which is led by the West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECARD), tests and captures lessons for an approach to scale out a promising intensification strategy based on integrated smallholder dairy and vegetable production that will significantly increase smallholder income and improve household food security, and make households more resilient. The action research will focus both at farm level on adapting the production system to the local context, and at market and policy levels on ensuring farmers have access to the inputs and services required to support the mixed production system, as well as to market outlets for their products. General and specific objectives The project overall objective is to enhance the contribution of agricultural and natural resources systems to improved livelihoods and quality of the environment in semi-arid areas of sub-Saharan Africa. The purpose is to build smallholder livelihoods resilience, and sustainability and profitability of smallholders by achieving the following specific objectives: Establish an integrated agricultural research for development (IAR4D) process for identifying, testing, adapting and scaling out of integrated smallholder dairy-horticulture systems that enhances livelihood resilience and sustainability in the semi-arid zones of West Africa Develop and promote social learning mechanisms for adapting integrated dairy-horticulture production technologies to local conditions appropriate for resource-poor households, gender-sensitive, and that conserve the natural resource base Develop and test innovative tools and options for upgrading local dairy and horticulture value chains that offer employment and generate added income for resource-poor market actors, especially women, while conserving the natural resource base Identify and formulate pro-poor policy options to support integrated, market-oriented and ecosystem-friendly dairy and vegetable smallholder enterprises Strengthen the capacity of researchers and research institutions in responding to the needs expressed by stakeholders along the dairy and vegetable value chains. The scope of ILRI’s involvement in the project covers training activities on methodologies and approaches related to IAR4D, value chain analysis and business development services, as well as scientific backstopping in the selection of study sites and implementation of baseline surveys. The project is funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC). Mali, Niger, Togo  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  Institut d'Economie Rurale (IER), Mali, Institut Togolais de Recherche Agronomique (ITRA), Togo, Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger, West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECARD)  Livestock, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Thomas Randolph  Derek Baker, Isabelle Baltenweck, Pamela Ochungo, Rainer Asse, Ranjitha Puskur 
668 Strengthening capacities for community-based livestock health service delivery in Ghibe Valley, Ethiopia International Livestock Research Institute  2007-01-01  2011-12-31  This project works to strengthen local capacity for innovation in animal health systems in Ghibe Valley, Ethiopia. The project employs action research using asset-based community development (ABCD) and innovation systems (IS) approaches to derive lessons on: how to bring about sustainable improvements in livestock health service delivery in the project site and how to translate improved livestock health into increased productivity and incomes. Ethiopia  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2    Livestock  Ranjitha Puskur  Anteneh Girma, Woudyalew Mulatu 
579 Supporting the vulnerable: Increasing the adaptive capacity of Agro pastoralists to Climatic change in West and Southern Africa using a Transdisciplinary research approach International Livestock Research Institute  2008-05-01  2011-04-30  The objective of the project is to increae adaptive capacity of agro pastoralists, who are one of the most vulnerable groups in Africa.  The purpose of the project is tor co-generate methods, inforamtion  and solutions between local communities, policy makers , intenational scientists etc Mali, Mozambique    African Union Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR), Kenya, German Institute for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture DITSL GmbH Witzenhausen, Institut d’Economie Rural (IER)- Mali, Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), Potsdam Insitute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Germany  Climate Change, Livestock  Mario Herrero  An Notenbaert, Philip Thornton 
592 Improving productivity and market success of Ethiopian farmers (IPMS) International Livestock Research Institute  2004-06-18  2010-03-31  The limited progress in improving livelihoods of smallholder farmers and pastoralists is a major challenge for the international, sub-regional and national agricultural research community to have greater impact. In 2002 a technology exhibition and workshop, organized by the Ethiopian Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MoARD) and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) concluded that the technologies which have been developed by the international, national and sub-regional research organizations were not benefiting the rural population to the extent desired. Based on this, ILRI in collaboration with other research organizations was requested to design a project which would lead to increased uptake and impact of technologies for smallholder farmers and pastoralists in Ethiopia. Following the Ethiopian government’s newly introduced strategy, the project was mandated to focus on market-oriented agricultural development, including private sector involvement. Based on these general directions, the IPMS project was designed as a research-for-development project, to be implemented in four Regional States (Amhara, Oromiya, SNNPR and Tigray) using Pilot Learning Woredas (PLW), aimed at assisting the MoARD to develop a more efficient system to give a fillip to market-oriented agricultural development. ILRI is implementing the project on behalf of the MoARD. A number of international, national, and regional research and development partners collaborate in the implementation of project activities. The Government and people of Canada fund the project through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). An agreement for the use of these funds was signed between ILRI and CIDA which came into effect on 18 June 2004 and expired on 31 March 2010. A Project Implementation Plan (PIP) was developed in collaboration with the stakeholders and partners and submitted to the MoARD and CIDA in December 2004. Approval of the PIP was obtained in March 2005, and implementation of activities commenced in April 2005. Project Goal: To contribute to improved agricultural productivity and production through market-oriented agricultural development, as a means for achieving improved and sustainable livelihoods for the rural population. Project Purpose: To strengthen the effectiveness of the Government’s effort to transform agricultural productivity and production, and rural development in Ethiopia. Ethiopia  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MoARD), Ethiopia  Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Dirk Hoekstra  Azage Tegegne, Berhanu Gebremdhin, Ermias Sehai, Moti Jaleta, Ranjitha Puskur, Tesfaye Lemma 
616 Introduction of PE to strengthen animal disease surveillance and control for HPAI H5N1 International Livestock Research Institute  2008-09-01  2010-10-01  Capacity delopment for Community Animal Health Workers and Communities Egypt    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)  Livestock  Purvi Mehta   
641 Measuring, mapping, monitoring and mitigating drivers of the emergence of zoonotic and food-borne diseases: A case study International Livestock Research Institute  2010-05-01  2011-02-01  The aim of this project is to create a multi-disciplinary grouping of researchers, policymakers and other stakeholders to address the issue of the emergence of zoonotic and food-borne diseases in urban and peri-urban settings in the developing world. A combination of growth and migration is resulting in massive increases in the population of urban and peri-urban zones in Africa. The United Nations has estimated that city populations in Africa will rise from 35% of the total population in 2007 to 51% by 2030. The impacts of this on human welfare, healthcare, sanitation, and other policy-oriented fields has received vast attention, but there has not been a substantive effort to integrate across disciplines, particularly with regard to the impacts of these diverse issues on disease transmission. The focus is on diseases involving livestock reservoirs, using Nairobi, Kenya as a case study. Urban farming and livestock keeping are significant income generators; urbanization has been identified as one of the main drivers of the emergence of human diseases, though with little specific focus. It has been proposed that the processes leading to the emergence of new diseases are likely to be those that also matter for the re-emergence of endemic zoonotic and food-borne infections. Understanding these as models is a tractable problem; this study will therefore (1) improve our ability to predict the occurrence and burden of new diseases and (2) provide an opportunity to understand the biology and social ecology of existing but neglected diseases. Funding: Medical Research Council (UK) through the UK Government's Living With Environmental Change Initiative. Kenya  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2, 2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-3  Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Royal Veterinary College (RVC), University of Edinburgh  Livestock  Eric Fevre  Alice Njeru, Delia Grace, Florence Mutua, Kohei Makita, Steve Kemp 
643 Sustainable management of globally significant endemic ruminant livestock of West Africa (PROGEBE) International Livestock Research Institute  2008-01-01  2013-12-31  Due to demographic pressure, drought and human activity (e.g. deforestation, agriculture and bush fires), several species of endemic ruminant livestock breeds are threatened with extinction or dilution of their specific genetic traits. Their natural habitats are also increasingly being invaded by exotic livestock and converted into agricultural land with widespread deforestation due to strong demand for wood energy. Therefore, this project (also referred to by its French acronym, PROGEBE, Projet Régional de Gestion Durable du Bétail Ruminant Endémique) aims at preserving and strengthening sustainably the genetic characteristics of endemic livestock, and increasing its productivity and marketing in a enabling physical and institutional environment. Funding: UNDP, GEF, and the African Development Bank Partner: International Trypanotolerance Centre, the Gambia Gambia, Guinea, Mali, Senegal      Livestock  Abdou Fall  Isabelle Baltenweck, Jane Poole, Karen Marshall, Lokman Zaibet, Mohammed Said, Rainer Asse, Steve Staal 
647 Implementation of Kitengela Conservation Program International Livestock Research Institute  2008-11-01  2010-12-31  The purpose of the project is to secure open rangeland and the future of conservation in the wider Kitengela dispersal area known as Kaputiei, with Nairobi National Park as its focal point. It aims to achieve sustainable environmental, economic and social prosperity for the various land uses in the area and the various stakeholders. Kenya      Livestock, Policy & Institutions  Mohammed Said  Jan de Leeuw 
648 Scaling-up ILRI/ReSAKSS knowledge management activities in support of USAID-EA and partners International Livestock Research Institute  2010-10-01  2011-09-30  This study will compute protection and market access indicators for selected food staples among member states of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). For each product, the indicator of bilateral measurement of protection measures protection applied by each country on the product coming from each partner. This will allow calculation of the protection applied by each country on its imports and the average duty faced by each country on its exports to COMESA partners. The study will provide a measure of each member state’s commitment to realizing the goal of enhanced intra-regional trade and provide policy options for improving trade performance in the selected food staples. Funding: United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Burundi, Comoros, Congo Dem. Rep., Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2    Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Joseph Karugia  Gbegbelegbe Sika, Juliet Wanjiku, Jonesmus Wambua, Stella Massawe 
660 Quantitative genetic analysis of production traits to support breeding programs utilizing local chickens populations in Ethiopia International Livestock Research Institute  2007-07-01  2010-09-01  This study will undertake genetic analyses of local chicken populations to establish genetic parameters for traits of economic interest and intends to examine the genetic differences between the local populations and assess their relations to a reference exotic breed using autosomal DNA markers. It will also indicate the possible future use of local chicken populations for the development of genetic improvement programs utilising indigenous chickens of Ethiopia. At regional and global scale this project facilitates due recognition of important and unique gene pools in local populations as well as other poultry breeds, for the conservation and utilization of the genetic diversity Ethiopia    Wageningen University (The Netherlands)  Livestock  Tadelle Dessie   
659 Assessment of risks to human health associated with meat from different value chains in Nigeria:Using the example of the beef value chain International Livestock Research Institute  2010-03-01  2010-09-01  The World Bank is preparing an Integrated Animal and Human Health Management project for Nigeria. One of the four proposed components aims to address food safety through (a) upgrading biosecurity and meat hygiene in live-bird markets and (b) upgrading slaughter practices and meat handling hygiene in slaughter facilities and meat markets. Activities include upgrading live-bird markets, state and village-level slaughter facilities and slabs, and meat markets. Upgrading these links in the food safety chain will ensure that entire, integrated chains are developed, safeguarding meat quality from slaughter to consumer. This study was commissioned by the Government of Nigeria to summarize and generate evidence on the impact of food-borne disease associated with animal source foods. The overall objective of this study is to assess the costs associated with consumption of poor quality meat in Nigeria. Sub-objectives include assessment of: major hazards associated with meat; prevalence of meat-borne hazards in livestock, meat and humans; knowledge, attitudes and practice of meat value chain actors; health burden of meat-borne disease and other burdens; appropriate level of protection; and recommendation of possible approaches to improving meat safety in Nigeria. Nigeria  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agriculture Abeokuta (UNAAB), Cornell University  Livestock  Iheanacho Okike  Derek Baker, Delia Grace, John Gachohi, Jane Poole 
665 Small ruminant value chains as platforms for reducing poverty and increasing food security in dryland areas of India and Mozambique (imGoats) International Livestock Research Institute  2010-06-01  2013-05-31  The goal of the project is to increase incomes and food security in a sustainable manner by enhancing pro-poor small ruminant value chains in India and Mozambique. The project objectives are to pilot sustainable and replicable organizational and technical models to strengthen goat value chains in India and Mozambique that increase incomes, reduce vulnerability and enhance welfare amongst marginalized groups, including women and to document, communicate and promote appropriate evidence-based models for sustainable, pro-poor goat value chains. The main target groups in India and Mozambique are poor small ruminant (mainly goat) keepers, especially women, in arid and semi-arid areas. This includes small-scale agro-pastoralists who cultivate small plots of land, as well as the landless. In both cases, a high degree of dependence on common property resources is a key feature. The project works to transform subsistence-level goat production to a viable, profitable model, increasing incomes and thereby reducing poverty and enhancing food security, while preserving community and national resource systems. In addition to goat keepers, beneficiaries include other goat value chain actors, including small-scale traders, input and service providers. ILRI is the main implementing institution and is responsible for technical, administrative and financial management of the project. Rural community development activities are managed and conducted by the BAIF Development Research Foundation in India and CARE International in Mozambique. The project also collaborates with national researchers and other local development partners. Funding: International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the European Commission India, Mozambique    BAIF Development Research Foundation, CARE  Livestock, Market Access  Saskia Hendrickx  Derek Baker, Iain Wright, Michael Blummel, Nancy Johnson, Pamela Pali, Siboniso Moyo, Steve Staal, Tezira Lore 
663 Enhancing livelihoods of livestock-dependent poor people through increasing use of fodder: India and Nigeria (Fodder Innovation Project) International Livestock Research Institute  2007-01-01  2010-12-31  The Fodder Innovation Project, supported by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), is a learning initiative started in September 2002 in India and Nigeria. The overall focus of the project is on improving the livelihoods of the rural poor through increasing their options to feed livestock. The original premise of the project was that the most effective way to address fodder scarcity was to identify and disseminate new, improved varieties of fodder or dual-purpose crops on the basis of site-specific ‘baskets of options’ and to offer advice to farmers to enable them select options that best suit their particular environments. It was also premised that scaling up would take place through farmer-to-farmer exchanges and through the dissemination activities of development organisations partnering with the project. However, findings from the initial key project activities in Phase I showed that the issue of addressing fodder scarcity was much more complex than simply providing technologies such as improved germplasm. Accordingly the project changed its learning approach from technology to a partnership mode for alliance building and finally towards a facilitated multiple-actor and institutional perspective. Phase II, which started from January 2007, commonly known as the Fodder Innovation Project (FIP), continues to address issues relating to fodder scarcity, a major constraint to enhancing the livelihoods of the poor. However, it does this through experimenting with ways of building capacity required to innovate in order to address issues of fodder scarcity in equitable and sustainable ways. This initiative in the context of the System-wide Livestock Program is implemented by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in collaboration with the United Nations University (UNU-MERIT), the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) and the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA). India, Nigeria  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-2  International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), UNU Merit  Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Ranjitha Puskur  Alan Duncan, Ben Lukuyu, Iheanacho Okike, Ranjitha Puskur, Seife Ayele, Tesfaye Beshah, TS Vamsidhar Reddy 
636 Optimizing livelihood and environmental benefits from crop residues in smallholder crop-livestock systems in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia: regional case studies International Livestock Research Institute  2010-01-01  2011-12-01  Four regional documents that document (a) CR uses in mixed crop livestock systems at different intensification levels and with contrasting market access (b) implication and tradeoffs of CR allocations and decisions on livelihood and the environment © potential effects of promising TIP options on livestock and the environment; Tools to understand the complexities and dynamics of CR management in mixed systems and facilitate targeting of future interventions; Trans regional synthesis of the four case studies providing cross cutting lessons and system trajectories and identifying TIP options four future scaling out Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Zimbabwe    International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Wageningen University (The Netherlands)  Livestock  Alan Duncan   
492 DURABLE LATE BLIGHT RESISTANT POTATO VARIETIES THROUGH BIOTECHNOLOGY Centro Internacional de la Papa  2009-11-01  2015-09-01  Ever since the well-known Irish famine in the 19th century, late blight continues to be a devastating disease of the potato worldwide unless controlled by fungicides. Their cost and threat on farmers' health make efforts to develop resistance to this disease our top priority at the International Potato Center (CIP). We propose to engineer resistance to late blight in potato using direct transfer of several resistance (R) genes from the potato germplasm (wild species that are difficult to use in breeding but relate to the wild potato germplasm). The LBr Potato project was initially started in 2007 at the CIP biotech facilities (Applied Biotechnology Laboratory) in Peru. It is, however, targeting important regions of potato production in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, direct transfer of R genes into African-relevant varieties and subsequent testing has to take place in the targeted countries. We propose to focus on Kenya considering the importance of potato to poor farmers, the operational bio-safety regulation, and the excellent biotechnology facilities at Biosciences east and central Africa-International Livestock Research Institute (BecA-ILRI) Hub. Kenya    RUFORUM, Uganda  Crops  Marc Ghislain  Jane Maurine Gati, Maggie Mwathi 
499 Enhancing adaptive capacity to climate change impacts through well-managed water use for aquaculture integrated with small-scale irrigation in the Chinyanja Triangle in Africa WorldFish Center  2010-04-01  2013-03-31  This project contributes to improving food security and well being of sub-Saharan rural households trapped in cycles of poverty and vulnerability that are exacerbated by climate change. Practices are being developed that integrate aquaculture into diversified food production systems and enhance management of water use for aquaculture as well as improve small-scale irrigation. A scientific assessment will be conducted of the potential for sustaining high water productivity, improving capacity for design, developing and implementing approaches for enhancing water use, and providing guidance for water use by integrating aquaculture and small scale irrigation in the Chinyanja Triangle in the lower Zambezi River Basin. The basin encompasses the Southern and Central Provinces of Malawi, the Eastern Province of Zambia and the Tete Province of Mozambique. Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia    Department of Fisheries, Malawi, Department of Fisheries, Zambia, Department of Irrigation, Malawi, Department of Water Affairs, Zambia, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Meteorological Department, Malawi, Meteorological Department, Zambia, University of Malawi, University of Osnabrück, World Vision Mozambique  Aquaculture, Climate Change, Water Management  Suan Pheng Kam  CT Hoanh, Daniel Jamu, Joseph Nagoli, Katherine Snyder, Silvia Renn, Solomon Seyoum, Shwu Jiau Teoh, Xueliang Cai 
115 Oxfam Southern Malawi Livelihood Diversification and Improved Post harvest Crop Management WorldFish Center  2009-01-01  2010-12-31  This project is led and implemented by Oxfam. The WorldFish Center is a technical partner and is providing technical assistance where required. Malawi  2009-2011|WorldFish|WORLDFISH-6  Church of Central Africa Presbyterian - Blantyre Synod, Evangelical Lutheran Development Services, Oxfam  Aquaculture, Crops, Fisheries, Water Management  Joseph Nagoli   
494 Aquaculture Investments for Poverty Reduction in the Volta Basin: Creating Opportunities for Low-Income African Fish Farmers through Improved Management of Tilapia Genetic Resources (TiVo). WorldFish Center  2008-01-01  2011-01-01  A regional programme for developing and disseminating improved tilapia strains for aquaculture funded by the Agencia Espanola de Cooperación Internacional and implemented by FAO in collaboration with the WorldFish Center, and the Governments of the six countries sharing the Volta Basin. Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Mali, Togo    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)  Aquaculture, Water Management  Raul Ponzoni  Curtis Lind, Hooi Ling Khaw 
414 Dutch Associate Expert (AE): Enterprise and value chain strengthening to improve the livelihoods of small-scale banana farmers in eastern and central Africa Bioversity International  2010-05-01  2013-04-01  Funded by the Dutch government, the aim of the AE Programme is to assist in the economic and social development of developing countries and contribute to the achievement of the goals, objectives and implementation of the international cooperation activities of the host organisation (Bioversity in this case). The AE has the opportunity to gain relevant experience in international cooperation activities through hands-on learning and contributes to the overall goals of the AE Programme- the economic and social development of developing countries. The Programme considers technical assistance, policy advice and capacity building as the main tools for achieving these goals. Bioversity has just been granted funds for a socio economist and applications will be reviewed by 30th June 2010. By their perishable nature, bananas must be sold as quickly as they are mature. This, coupled with the lack of a reliable source of market information and with limited value-addition capacity, forces individual small scale farmers to sell their banana at any price offered by vendors. This has resulted into constant loss of income and has significantly contributed to the decline in living conditions and increased poverty in small-scale farming-systems-dependent communities in the great lakes region of east Africa. A frequently proposed alternative is for farmer organizations to consolidate greater volumes of production, to strengthen local negotiating power and to improve understanding of markets and prices. The implementation of such strategies is incipient and has often been based specialty crops such as cocoa, essential oils and natural medicinal products. The opportunities for refocusing value-chains for food crops towards greater farmer participation and greater value are abundant, but have not been the focus of most research projects. In 2009-2010, Bioversity International is undertaking three new research grants with components focused on the marketing of banana biodiversity for increased added value to small-scale farmers and their rural community enterprises. In these new grants the proposed associate expert will work to integrate production technology testing and promoting value-addition and marketing initiatives in banana producing communities in six countries in the region. The associate expert will have the opportunity to collaborate with Bioversity staff, external consultants and national counterparts in the development of strategies to improve the contribution of banana production and marketing to rural development and to the reduction of rural poverty. The associate expert will: Review relevant methods and experiences on value chain analysis and governance, farmer organization strengthening and market identification and development in east Africa and collaborate with researchers in other regions of the continent; Conduct applied research directly and in collaboration with students and collaborators to understand livelihood strategies of banana producing households, to describe current market channels, to identify alternative differentiated and niche markets for banana and banana products, to develop strategies for improving value chain governance mechanisms to the benefit of rural communities and to develop strategies for establishing and strengthening farmer organizations to the benefit of poor households; Prepare and carry out training activities based on methods adapted from other projects and incorporating research results in the project directed towards farm households and incipient farmer organizations, actors in value chains and service providers linked to improving chain governance; Link project staff and counterparts from national partners to the growing body of experience on value chains, marketing strategies, farmer organizations, entrepreneurship and rural development; Participate in other activities contributing to the success of the projects. The work plan will address important global questions (food security, income, nutrition), while at the same time contributing to the specific needs of banana farmers in the on-going projects.  Burundi, Congo Dem. Rep., Rwanda, Uganda      Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Ecosystem Management, Market Access  Wellington Jogo  Charles Staver, Eldad Karamura 
420 Community-Based Fish Culture in Irrigation Systems and Seasonal Floodplains WorldFish Center  2005-04-01  2010-03-31  The past decade has seen the growing recognition of the crisis facing the world’s water resources and thus the need for concerted efforts to use them more efficiently. It is well understood that the efficiency of water use, or water productivity, can be increased by either producing more output per unit of water used or by reducing water losses – or by the combination of both. However, strategies (developed and applied so far) for increasing output have been limited to agricultural crop cultivation and have not fully taken advantage of increased water productivity by integrating fish and other living aquatic resources into the existing water use systems. Such opportunities of integration include community-based fish culture in irrigation schemes and seasonal floodplains. The main objective of this five year action research CPWF project was to test technical and institutional options for floodplain aquaculture, implemented on a collective basis at selected locations in five countries, namely Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Mali and Vietnam. The community-based fish culture model was originally developed in Bangladesh, building on three decades of research in community-based fisheries management and floodplain aquaculture. The project aimed to disseminate the model to other countries with extensive floodplain resources that could potentially generate important benefits for floodplain communities, addressing the following objectives: To develop appropriate technical and institutional options for increasing water productivity at basin level through integration of community-based fish production into existing floodplain and irrigation systems. To identify the most appropriate models of collective action for aquaculture under different socio-ecological contexts. To assess the contribution of collective approaches to aquaculture for sustainable development of floodplain resources and irrigation systems. In addition to these objectives, the project also aimed to answer two research questions: 1. What is the contribution of collective approaches to aquaculture for sustainable development of floodplain resources and irrigation systems?2. What are the most appropriate models of collective action for aquaculture under different socio-ecological contexts?The project sought to apply a range of alternative approaches to implement, monitor and evaluate the progress and results of the interventions, with the aim of disseminating the model to countries with extensive floodplain resources that could potentially generate important benefits for floodplain communities.” Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Mali, Vietnam      Fisheries, Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Meen Chee Hong  Benoy Kumar Barman 
503 Aquaculture for Improved Livelihoods: Development and Dissemination of Innovative Fish Farming Technology WorldFish Center  2007-10-01  2010-09-30  Assembling an innovative fish farming technology package capable of increasing fish production by 50 percent. The aim is to increase incomes, food production, and enhance nutrition security in Malawi. Researchers address the current constraints to aquaculture development related to lack of quality seed and feed, lack of appropriate production technologies, and lack of marketing channels. They are developing a model for fingerling production and distribution, facilitating the adoption of improved management practices and developing fish marketing channels from rural producers to urban and peri-urban markets. Malawi    Chancellor College, University of Malawi, National AquacultureCenter, Malawi Fisheries Department, University of Malawi, Bunda College of Agriculture, World Vision  Aquaculture  Daniel Jamu   
500 Addressing Climate Change by Building Social and Ecological Resilience in the Lake Chilwa Basin WorldFish Center  2010-04-01  2015-03-30  According to recent United Nations climate change profiles, Malawi is predicted to experience higher temperatures and precipitation falling in a shorter period with heavier rainfall. Malawi has already experienced a variety of dry spells, droughts, intense rainfalls, riverine floods and flash floods. Researchers working on this project are aiming to secure the livelihoods of some 1.5 million people and to enhance the resilience of the natural resource base in the Lake Chilwa Basin. In order to maintain food security, economic and social benefits of agriculture and natural resources in the face of known climate variability and anticipated climate change, researchers are developing and implementing basin-wide climate change adaptation strategies that will enhance the resilience of communities. They work to strengthen local and district institutions to better manage natural resources and build resilience to climate change. The project facilitates and helps to build cross-basin and cross-sectoral natural resources management and planning policy for climate change throughout the basin. Researchers also work to improve household and enterprise capacity to adapt.  Through improved forest management and governance, the project will contribute to mitigation of the effects of climate change. The Malawi Government recently approved the National Adaptation Programme of Action for climate change. The efforts of the WorldFish Center and partners would be complimentary to the efforts of the national government. Malawi    Forestry Research Institute of Malawi, Leadership for Environment and Development (LEAD-SA)  Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Fisheries  Daniel Jamu  Joseph Nagoli 
100 Aquaculture for Improved Livelihoods: Development and Dissemination of Innovative Fish Farming Technology WorldFish Center  2007-10-01  2010-06-30  Malawi  2009-2011|WorldFish|WORLDFISH-2, 2009-2011|WorldFish|WORLDFISH-4  National AquacultureCenter, Malawi Fisheries Department, University of Malawi, Bunda College of Agriculture, University of Malawi, Chancellor College, World Vision Malawi  Aquaculture  Emma Kambewa  Brino Chirwa, Emma Kambewa, Harry Wala, Joseph Nagoli, Jeremiah Kang'ombe, Patrick Kambewa 
469 Conservation and Sustainable Management of Below-Ground Biodiversity ( CSM-BGBD) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2006-01-05  2010-04-30  The objective of the project was to enhance awareness, knowledge and understanding of below-ground biological diversity (BGBD) importance to the sustainable agricultural production in tropical landscapes by the demonstration of methods for conservation and sustainable management. The project explored the hypothesis that, by appropriate management of above- and below-ground biota, optimal conservation of biodiversity for national and global benefits can be achieved in mosaics of land-uses at differing intensities of management and furthermore results in simultaneous gains in sustainable agricultural production. The findings of this project are likely to have important implications for food security and farmers livelihoods and incomes. One of which is that the amount of fertilizer needed to boost yields is far less than using inorganic fertilizer on its own. Other important findings are that some of the micro-organisms assist in fighting crop diseases which in turn can reduce the need for pesticides. For farmers switching to organic agriculture—whose produce commands higher premiums on world markets—this could prove especially valuable. Brazil, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Uganda    Jawaharlal Nehru Agricultural University, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Université de Cocody (Côte d’Ivoire),, University of Nairobi  Agrobiodiversity, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management, Soils  Jeroen Huising  Peter Okoth 
505 Study on spatial variation of soil physical properties in a long-term conservation tillage experimental field Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-06-12  2010-03-31    This was a fellowship grant to foster scientific excellence and build capacity in agriculture and related activities. The project aimed at enhancing the capacity of the proponents in undertaking soil physical studies and have a better understanding of the changes in the soil properties as influenced by tillage operations at field scale. Kenya    Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI)  Soils  Okeyo Jeremiah   
102 Cohort Development for HIV Vaccine Trials in Fishing Communities WorldFish Center  2008-01-01  2010-12-31  This three-year project aims to strengthen long-term capacity for HIV vaccine candidates in Uganda and Malawi thorough development of a network of collaborating organizations in Europe. Project researchers are working to expand and diversify existing high-risk cohorts for study by including fishing communities in Uganda and Malawi. Surveys would help the researchers describe the population for the study and gather data on the populations' health and sexual behavior. The overall aim is to expand capacity for future trials of HIV vaccines, which, if shown effective, would provide an important tool for HIV/AIDS prevention. The WorldFish Center would provide technical support in these efforts, help to identify fisher-folk for the study, support social science research capacity building for work in fishing communities, and liaise with fisheries departments and other policy stakeholders. Uganda Virus Research Institute is the project coordinator Malawi, Uganda    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative  Fisheries  Joseph Nagoli   
489 Conservation Agriculture in AFRICA: Analyzing and Foreseeing its Impact – Comprehending its Adoption. Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-01-01  2012-06-30  The overall goal of the project is to assess and learn jointly from the past and on-going Conservation Agriculture (CA) experiences under which conditions and to what extend does Conservation Agriculture strengthen the socio-economic position of land holders in Africa. This will allow identifying the knowledge gaps for future research, development and promotion of Conservation Agriculture. The project is coordinated  by Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD). Burkina Faso, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Mozambique, Tanzania, Tunisia    Agricultural Research Council (ARC), South Africa, CIRAD- Département des Systèmes Biologiques (Cirad-Bios), France, Department of Agricultural Research an Technical Services (DARTS) - Malawi, Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Institut de Recherche Agronomique de Guinée (IRAG), Guinea, Institut de Recherches Agronomiques du Niger (INRAN), Niger, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Selian Agricultural Research Institute (SARI) - Tanzania  Crops, Ecosystem Management, Land Management  Saidou Koala   
502 Captive Fisheries for Income and Strengthened Households (C-FISH) WorldFish Center  2007-11-01  2010-08-01  The C-Fish project will focus on providing small scale, low income producers and other large stakeholders with technical assistance, improved feeds, fish fingerlings and access to credit necessary to significantly increase their production, income and food security. The C-Fish project will develop an implement an innovative, sustainable, for-profit business development services model that will link smallholder fish producers with new an existing small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the sector. This BDS Model - entitled Fish Pros- will select local men and women extensionists and train them in business development and scientific aspects of aquaculture. They will be empowered to provide needed technical assistance to small holder producers in the communities where they live and work, as well as to high-quality, project-developed fish feed and other inputs at a profit. C-Fish will strengthen and effectively local soy and other crop producers and producer groups into the aquaculture value chain in Southern Malawi. The project will provide technical assistance and for-profit business planning to project stakeholders, while also increasing opportunities for capital investments in the aquaculture sector. Project partners will help establish new microfinance loan products and create equity investments opportunities in aquaculture SMEs and other business. Project objectives include: 1. Create sustainable Fish PROS training program; 2. Develop affordable, soy-based feed that is produced using appropriate technology and local manufacturing; 3. Improve tilapia fingerling production and distribution; 4. Develop credit systems for C-Fish program participants; 5. Improve tilapia production, market access and transportation to urban and peri-urban markets; and 6. Increase percentage of women fish producers PCI is the lead agency and fiscal agent in the C-FISH project, and will coordinate all project activities and the work of our partners, including WorldFish Center (WFC). PCI will participate in all technical interventions of the C-FISH project, including the training of Fish PROS extentionists, mobilization and coordination of partners, community members, beneficiaries and other stakeholders. PCI will also coordinate the development of related aquaculture value chains, in cooperation with the other project partners, stakeholders and funders. WFC will work with PCI to oversee and coordinate many of the technical aspects of the C-FISH Project, including: assisting private sector partners in the production of fish fingerlings, assisting in the development of the soy-based fish feed; and in the training of for-profit aquaculture extentionsits (Fish PROS). Malawi    PCI  Aquaculture, Market Access  Daniel Jamu  Asafu Daniel Gideon Chijere, Joseph Nagoli 
498 Integrated Coastal and Fisheries Governance for Western Region of Ghana WorldFish Center  2009-10-01  2013-10-01  The Coastal Resources Center (CRC) at the University of Rhode Island (URI) is the lead implementer for this project. CRC/URI was awarded the USAID Integrated Coastal and Fisheries Governance project and will work with the WorldFish Center and other partners for implementation. For more information on the overall project, contact Mark Fenn, Program Director, CRC-Ghan Email: mfenn@crc.uri.edu or visit the following webpage: http://www.crc.uri.edu/index.php?projectid=110 WorldFish provides important technical services related to fisheries co-management, governance and socio-economic analysis in close collaboration with Ghanaian partners and, where appropriate, local consultants as well as ICFG project staff. The current focus for WorldFish is on three areas, namely (1) creating the conditions for improved fisheries management, (2) capacity development for fisheries management, and (3) value chain analysis & livelihoods. Ghana    Government of Ghana  Ecosystem Management, Fisheries, Policy & Institutions  Ann Gordon  Cambria Finegold 
497 Socio – economic baseline study of Idku Gas Hub operation, and a study of Rashpetco Phase VII social impacts WorldFish Center  2009-07-01  2010-12-31  The WorldFish Center has been working with BG and its partners in an assessment of the livelihood impacts of the Idku Gas Hub on fishing livelihoods in Egypt. Researchers on this proposal provide baseline data in order to evaluate any future effects of the operations and work to identify and design social investments to address possible negative socioeconomic effects. Researchers are considering demographic factors, socioeconomic status of the effected populations, social organization, economic organization, sociopolitical context, history, needs, values, human rights, institutions and cultural background. Egypt    Central Laboratory for Aquaculture Research (CLAR)  Fisheries  Cambria Finegold  Ahmed Mohamed Nasr-Allah, Ann Gordon, Diaa Al-Kenawy 
504 Strengthening Livelihoods and Incomes of the Rural Poor Households in Angónia District through Integrated Aquaculture-Agriculture (IAA) WorldFish Center  2009-09-01  2010-11-30  Adapting Integrated Aquaculture Agriculture (IAA) to the needs of the Angonia people of Mozambique. Services and knowledge are being delivered via partnerships with community based organizations. Poverty is concentrated in rural areas of Mozambique. More than 80 percent of poor households live in rural areas and on less than US$1 per day. Low agricultural productivity contributes to this poverty and is the result of a lack of appropriate technologies and support services, as well as distance from market and other competitive market failures. Researchers working on the project seek to increase household incomes and expand livelihood options for at least 2,000 households composed of small-scale farmers. Project participants support construction of earthen ponds to grow fish. Researchers would train farmers and local institutions in the use of animal, crop and household waste as fertilizer for the ponds to improve algae growth, the primary feed for the fish. Researchers also work to enhance knowledge about nutrition in households and introduce methods for using water from the ponds as a source of enriched irrigation to support an expanded set of crops such as green maize--a variety of maize with increased market value over traditionally propagated maize. Mozambique    Ministry of Fisheries, Mozambique, World Vision Mozambique  Aquaculture, Water Management  Joseph Nagoli  Asafu Daniel Gideon Chijere 
496 USAID Central Africa Regional Program for Envir (CARPE-2) – Tumba Landscape WorldFish Center  2006-09-29  2010-09-30  WorldFish Center is being sub-contracted by WWF to provide inputs to Phase II of the USAID-funded CARPE “Lac Tele Lac Tumba” landscape management project. The 2nd phase will last 5 years and commenced in October 2006. Although the CARPE landscapes are fundamentally focused on conservation of the Congo River Basin rainforest and threatened flora and fauna therein, WorldFish inputs will focus on assessments and related follow-up work on (a) the existing / potential role of fisheries/aquaculture in livelihoods, and (b) fisheries management. This is a transboundary landscape and WorldFish Center has only been contracted to work in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) part of the landscape (which also extends into Republic of Congo). The main focus of the CARPE work at this point is on reducing post-harvest losses and fisheries livelihoods. Congo Dem. Rep.    Réseau Femmes Africaines pour le Développement Durable (REFADD)  Agrobiodiversity, Aquaculture, Ecosystem Management, Fisheries, Forestry & Agroforestry  Cambria Finegold  Ann Gordon 
495 USAID Central Africa Regional Program for Envir (CARPE-2) – Maringa Landscape WorldFish Center  2006-10-01  2011-09-30  WorldFish Center is being sub-contracted by AWF to provide inputs to Phase II of the USAID-funded CARPE “Maringa-Lopori-Wamba” (MLW) landscape management project in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The 2nd phase will last 5 years and commenced in October 2006. Although the CARPE landscapes are fundamentally focused on conservation of the Congo River Basin rainforest and threatened flora and fauna therein, WorldFish inputs to the M-L-W landscape will focus on assessments and related follow-up work on (a) the existing / potential role of fisheries/aquaculture in livelihoods, and (b) fisheries management. The main focus at this point is on reducing post-harvest losses and fisheries livelihoods. Congo Dem. Rep.    Réseau Femmes Africaines pour le Développement Durable (REFADD)  Agrobiodiversity, Aquaculture, Ecosystem Management, Fisheries, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management  Cambria Finegold  Ann Gordon 
478 Putting Nitrogen Fixation to Work for Smallholder Farmers in Africa.- N2Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-09-29  2013-10-31    The aim of this project isto develop the state-of-the-art legume and rhizobial inoculant technologies will be used by African smallholder farmers to triple the inputs of free atmospheric nitrogen by biological nitrogen fixation, thereby improving crop and livestock productivity, human nutrition and farm income, while enhancing soil health. The expected project outcomes include the Diversification of N2-fixing legume species that are integrated into smallholder farming systems in sub-Saharan Africa;Expansion in cultivation of grain and forage legumes, greater productivity in legume-based farming systems, and enhanced family incomes; Selection of efficient rhizobial inoculant strains and improved grain legume varieties with enhanced BNF capacities adapted to various environmental stresses; Establishment of a state-of-the-art laboratory and culture collection of elite strains of rhizobia for target legumes; and Establishment of rhizobial inoculant production in countries of West, East and Southern Africa, through partnership with the private sector.   Congo Dem. Rep., Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Zimbabwe    CNFA, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Stdies(CAVS) UON, College of Physical and Biological Sciences (CPBS) UON, CRI, Institut de L'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles(INERA),DRC, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science and Technology (KNUST), National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)- Uganda, Selian Agricultural Research Institute (SARI) - Tanzania, SOFECSA, AfNet, Soil Research Institute, Kumasi; GHANA (SRI), Wageningen University (The Netherlands), World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)  Crops, Market Access, Soils  Kenton Dashiell  Bernard VanLauwe, Nteranya Sanginga 
472 Challenges and opportunities for nutrients efficient agriculture in West Africa Cities Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-03-01  2011-02-28  This was a research and training project was set up by a team of senior scientists from African and European research institutions and from the well established pan-African research and training network AfNet. It was linked to a project on matter fluxes through UA activities in Niamey (Niger) funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG; BU1308/5-1). Whereas the DFG project emphasizes basic research and compares the reliability of methodological approaches, the applied research proposed by this project was to capitalize on networking opportunities with the existing pan-African network - AfNet (CIAT). It was thus aimed at training highly qualified African junior scientists through workshops, targeted field research and modeling with data collected simultaneously at different sites. Burkina Faso, Mali, Nigeria      Policy & Institutions  Saidou Koala   
476 Accelerated uptake & utilization of soil fertility management in East & Central Africa sub-region Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-04-06  2010-03-12      The main purpose of this project is to enhance uptake and scaling up of knowledge and technologies for soil fertility management to sustained productivity and competitiveness of smallholder farming systems in East and Central Africa (ECA) sub-region.There are barriers to the effective adoption/adaptation and utilization of sound soil and water management technologies. The project team therefore sets out to develop methodologies for resolving these barriers by developing mechanisms of sharing relevant information on promising soil and water management technologies with all stakeholders. Kenyatta University is the Lead institution in the project and the project activities are coordinated and backstopped by the African Network for Soil Biology and Fertility(AFNET).   Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda    Agriculture Research Institute - Tanzania, Kenyatta University, National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)- Uganda  Soils, Water Management  Saidou Koala  Waswa Boaz, Okeyo Jeremiah 
479 A globally integrated African soil information service (AfSIS) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-11  2012-10-31  The aim of this project is that farming communities, extension services, development workers, project designers, planners, policy makers, the private sector, and scientists will have freely available access to a reliable, flexible and dynamic soil-health information service for the ultimate benefit of the African smallholder farm family. It will provide accurate, up-to-date information about soil re-sources and their management to support policy and action on food and water security, production, and regulating and supporting ecosystem services. This soil information will be essential to increase land productivity and food production, arrest hunger and ecosystem degradation, and to adapt to climate change in Africa. Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, Tanzania    Bunda college of Agriculture,University of Malawi,Malawi, Earth Institute at Columbia University, Institut d'Economie Rurale (IER), Mali, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security (MoAFS), Malawi, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)  Land Management, Soils  Nteranya Sanginga  Elizabeth Nambiro, Jeroen Huising, Peter Okoth 
481 Evaluation of commercial products for improving & sustaining crop yields in selected agro-ecological zones in Sub-Saharan Africa (COMPRO) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-01-12  2011-11-30    The goal of this project is to assist farmers in obtaining increased and stable crop yields that allow them to sustainably generate more income through marketing of their produce. The project is screening and evaluating chemical and biological commercial products with an aim of scaling up these products through partnerships with private companies. This effort hopes to increase crop yield by 30% and directly empower about 175,500 households in targeted agroecological zones in Kenya, Ethiopia, Niger and Nigeria.   Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, Nigeria    Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Moi University  Crops, Land Management, Market Access, Soils  Didier Lesueur  Nteranya Sanginga 
197 Enhancing Animal Health Systems in Africa International Livestock Research Institute  2007-01-10  2011-09-30  The Key Challenge Weaknesses in veterinary surveillance systems in Africa have been highlighted during recent outbreaks of infectious diseases such as Rift Valley fever and Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza. Conventional passive surveillance has proven largely ineffective due to poor capacity and compliance, and many countries are not able to sustain active surveillance activities. As the result, public veterinary services and the commercial livestock sector are unable to detect and respond in a timely fashion to outbreaks of new disease threats, nor to manage successfully the control of transboundary diseases, many of which remain endemic in parts of the continent. This situation not only compromises the development of livestock trade, but also creates a continuing threat to human public health since the majority of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, shared by animals and humans. Strategies are needed to ensure that surveillance systems can meet the challenges posed by emerging infectious diseases, while recognizing the context of resource limitations. Identifying appropriate tools and incentives that encourage the full participation of both public and private actors will be critical. Approach The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Africa Bureau has identified three specific priority areas for strengthening the capacity of African animal health disease surveillance systems to enhance early detection and reporting of infectious animal disease: Providing veterinary professionals a toolkit of equipment, materials and information to aid them in detecting disease in the field and collecting samples, together with developing a business strategy for creating and sustaining internationally accredited laboratory capacity for timely processing of samples from the field; Engaging private-sector resources and capacity to enhance disease surveillance through public-private partnerships with commercial actors and with private veterinarians; and Developing the capacity of AU-IBAR’s (InterAfrican Bureau of Animal Resources of the African Union) animal disease information system to strengthen national disease surveillance capacities through communication strategies providing information and training. The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) addressed these priorities through a series of activities implemented in close collaboration with AU-IBAR and other African partners from May to September 2009. Several underlying principles inform the design of the activities as stated in the USAID Africa Bureau strategy. These include: Ensuring the interventions are demand-driven, responding to the needs of the targeted beneficiaries, by consulting with the intended users during design and implementation; Assessing the feasibility and sustainability of proposed interventions based on a combination of analyses using techniques drawn from business planning and institutional economics; the former highlights the need for financial sustainability through cost-recovery where appropriate, whereas the latter focuses on understanding the incentives that motivate the targeted public and private-sector actors to participate in and sustain the interventions; Sustaining the knowledge component of surveillance capacity requires establishing mechanisms that provide continuous access for practitioners in the field to the most up-to-date disease information; Public-sector capacity will remain inadequate to ensure surveillance so mechanisms must be established to involve complementary private-sector capacity; and African experts are capable of providing many short-term training and technical assistance services at substantial savings of project budget. From October 2009 to September 2011, funds that had not been spent while implementing the first set of activities were allocated to support the development of AU-IBAR's disease reporting and knowledge base system: ARIS II. It is also supporting a major workshop in March 2011 bringing together Chief Veterinary Officers and other stakeholders from the Horn of Africa and Gulf states to explore the use of a decision support tool for Rift Valley fever control to help stabilize livestock trade. Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Africa  2009-2011|ILRI|ILRI-2  The African Union/Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR), University of Pretoria  Livestock  Thomas Randolph  Bernard Bett, Jeff Mariner 
191 African Agricultural Markets Conference – Towards priority actions for market development for African farmers International Livestock Research Institute  2009-05-13  2009-05-15  The critical role markets play in improving food production and livelihoods of Africa’s millions of smallholder farmers is widely recognized. African food markets and marketing systems should be catalyzing small farm growth on the continent. They are not. New approaches are needed to create vibrant food markets. The record-high levels of today’s food prices are a blessing for some food producers able to increase their production and profits and a curse for millions of poor net food buyers finding it more and more difficult to feed their families. To make high value and staple food markets work for smallholder farmers while providing affordable food for poor consumers, we know we need better markets. We also need incentives that encourage both a pro-poor and a pro-growth Green Revolution for Africa. To improve markets and market incentives for the poor, this conference was held to discuss practical strategies for lowering the high transaction costs of food marketing and intra-regional trade; determining appropriate, equitable and safe food standards and grades; and helping small-scale entrepreneurs access good market information and add value to food production processes. The three-day conference -- held on 13-15 May 2009 in Nairobi, Kenya -- brought together some 150 market practitioners, investors, private actors, policymakers and researchers to determine how agricultural markets can help stimulate a uniquely African Green Revolution. Evidence will be synthesized to guide new market interventions and experiments by development practitioners and investors. For more information, please visit the conference website, http://agmarketsafrica.wordpress.com. MEDIA COVERAGE Knowledge is power for farmers. By Joyce Mulama, Inter Press Service. 16 May 2009. New markets to reduce waste of produce. By Jackson Okoth, The Standard. 14 May 2009. Kenya  2009-2011|ILRI|ILRI-2  Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA), Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), Regional Plan for Collective Action in Eastern and Southern Africa of the CGIAR, Rockefeller Foundation  Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Derek Baker  Steve Staal 
225 East Africa Dairy Development Project – Phase 1 International Livestock Research Institute  2007-12-15  2011-12-31  The East Africa Dairy Development project is a regional industry development program implemented by Heifer International in partnership with ILRI, TechnoServe, the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and the African Breeders Service Total Cattle Management. The project is working in Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the goal of this project is to help one million people – 179,000 families living on small 1-5 acre farms – lift themselves out of poverty through more profitable production and marketing of milk. Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda  2009-2011|ICRAF|ICRAF-1, 2009-2011|ICRAF|ICRAF-3, 2009-2011|ILRI|ILRI-2  African Breeders’ Service Total Cattle Management (ABS), Heifer International, Technoserve, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)  Livestock, Market Access, Policy & Institutions  Isabelle Baltenweck  Alan Duncan, Amos Omore, Ben Lukuyu, Julie Ojango, Okeyo Mwai, Steve Franzel, Steve Staal 
121 Cross-disciplinary risk assessment of cysticercosis in eastern and southern Africa (CESA) International Livestock Research Institute  2006-06-01  2009-01-31  Cysticercosis is emerging as a serious public health and agricultural problem in eastern and southern Africa. The disease is caused by a pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, and is transmitted from pigs to humans through infected pork. The project addresses the problem of cysticercosis (cysts by the tapeworm Taenia solium in pigs and humans ), involving a multidisciplinary coalition of researchers from veterinary, agricultural, human medical and social sciences in Tanzania, Mozambique and Denmark that will address four major obstacles for combating cysticercosis: Characterizing the disease and its risk factors and societal impact Increasing capacity for identifying and managing cysticercosis cases Identifying appropriate and sustainable "best bet" prevention and control strategies Promoting collaboration among the various relevant stakeholder groups At its conclusion, the project will have raised awareness among policymakers and community leaders as well as within the affected populations and scientific, health professional and agricultural development communities in the selected countries and eastern and southern Africa region about the true extent of the problem and appropriate responses to it. These activities are intended to result in a sustainable coordinated control strategy in the form of full-fledged national and regional campaigns. This will lead to reduced incidence of cysticercosis and improved livelihoods of poor farming communities and consumers. The project is coordinated from Denmark but all field work done by 1 post doc, 3 PhD and 6 MSc students in the partner countries Tanzania and Mozambique in close collaboration with Universities in Kenya and South Africa. The project is funded by the Danish International Developing Agency (DANIDA) under the Danish Foreign Ministry. Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania  2009-2011|ILRI|4  Centre for Health Research and Development (DBL) - University of Copenhagen, Eduardo Mondlane University, Muhumbili University College of Health Sciences, Sokoine University of Agriculture - Tanzania, University of Nairobi, University of Pretoria  Livestock  Stig Thamsborg  Arve Lee Willingham, Thomas Randolph 
120 Animal source foods and nutrition during early life: An evaluation of the possible link between livestock keeping, food intake and nutritional status of young children (6-18 months old) in resource-poor areas International Livestock Research Institute  2004-09-01  2008-05-31  This project aims to improve our understanding of the role that animal source foods (milk, eggs, meat and liver) play in the nutritional status of young children in resource-poor areas and how this varies across households that practice different types of livestock activities in sub-Saharan Africa. The project objectives are to: evaluate the importance of animal source foods as sources of energy, high quality protein and bioavailable micronutrients in infants and young children consuming complementary foods in a sample of Ethiopian households; and characterize the animal source foods available in the same households, and the pathways by which livestock keeping influences their availability. The field work was carried out by PhD students from Switzerland (ETH) and Ethiopia (Humboldt University, Germany). Ethiopia  2009-2011|ILRI|4  Laboratory for Human Nutrition, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zürich  Livestock  Lena Davidsson  Richard Hurrell, Thomas Randolph 
196 Early detection, reporting and surveillance for avian influenza in Africa (EDRSAIA) International Livestock Research Institute  2010-01-01  2011-09-30  This project aims to enhance or build sustainable capacity in the region for early detection, reporting and surveillance of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). The project uses risk-based approaches (risk mapping, value chain analysis and risk assessment) to create tools and train decision-makers in their use, enabling targeting of scarce resources at areas of greatest risk from the introduction and impacts of HPAI. Objectives Improve national, sub-regional and regional capacity for evidence-based risk assessment approaches to enable rapid response for HPAI. Improve national surveillance and reporting capacity. Increase sub-regional cooperation and coordination, with regional support to undertake HPAI investigations, report disease and manage HPAI relevant information. Summary of activities The project objectives are addressed through a series of activities for each project location.  While the project activities have been tailored to each location, they contain a number of common elements as follows: Rapidly assess existing HPAI surveillance systems Develop, disseminate and train in the use of effective tools for targeting HPAI surveillance resources Train in HPAI surveillance techniques, tools and approaches, including outbreak reporting and data analysis Develop linkages with sub-regional and regional surveillance, disease investigation and learning networks Expected outputs HPAI surveillance systems assessed and training needs identified Effective evidence-based tools for targeting HPAI surveillance resources based on risk developed HPAI surveillance practitioners trained in surveillance techniques, tools and approaches Knowledge base with regard to HPAI expanded through regional and sub-regional linkages Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe  2009-2011|ILRI|ILRI-2  Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), The African Union/Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR), Vétérinaires Sans Frontières (VSF-B), Belgium  Livestock  Heather Hannah  Thomas Randolph 
491 Strengthening the Capacity of the African Network for Soil Biology and Fertility (AfNet) for improved Soil Health in selected Intensification Zones in Sub-Saharan Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2010-01-01  2012-12-31  The objective of the project is to strengthen and sustain African researchers capacities to harvest, generate, document, share and apply knowledge and skills in ISFM practices, fertilizer recommendations and cropping systems management in order to improve the sustainability of food production and the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in Sub Saharan Africa.   Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, Zambia      Crops, Ecosystem Management, Land Management  Saidou Koala   
471 Increasing total farm productivity in vulnerable production system in Mozambique through improved germplasm, water and nutrient use efficiencies Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2006-08-01  2011-03-31  This project's goal is to evaluate promising interventions for reducing the production vulnerability of smallholder farmers in central Mozambique through the improved use of germplasm, nutrients and water. The project is testing and disseminating improved agricultural production systems based on drought and disease tolerant germplasm and improved natural resource use based on conservation agriculture (CA) principles, through participatory on-farm experimentation by farmers, combined with spatial analysis tools to characterize problems and help target interventions. It is also evaluating the trade-offs of adopting interventions and address critical development questions. Mozambique    Eduardo Mondlane University, Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU)  Land Management  Nelson Mango   
490 Efficient water and nutrient use in cereal grains systems in market based conservation agriculture systems. (Phase III). Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-01-07  2010-12-31    Project aims to generate and promote new interventions for managing sustainable crop production with tangible economic benefits for smallholder farmers through on-farm participatory research and validation, designed to test and support adoption by farmers of resource-efficient practices, together with improved post harvest handling and diversification of production systems with high value crops.   Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe    International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)  Crops, Land Management  Nelson Mango   
477 Promoting conservation agriculture to improve land & profitability among farmers in Western Kenya. Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-01-11  2010-10-31  This project aims at promoting widespread adoption of conservation agriculture by smallholder farmers while protecting and improving soil conditions to achieve higher yields and enhanced environmental services in East Africa. Specific interventions were to develop effective development pathways” or road maps on the practice of CA at the target benchmark sites. The smallholder farmers who form the majority of land users need to be convinced on the effectiveness of CA, to enable them adopt and adapt it as a sustainable agricultural practice. The goal is to bring the farmers out of poverty with no further impoverishment of soils and other natural resources.   Kenya    Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI)  Land Management  Saidou Koala   
474 Going to scale: Developing strategies for scaling out market-oriented organic agriculture from farmer group to association level Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-07-01  2010-12-31    The overall goal of this project is to contribute towards poverty alleviation, food security, improved nutrition and better resource management through market oriented organic agriculture.The project aims to empower farmers in selected communities (with emphasis on gender and marginalized groups) and other key stakeholders to identify market opportunities, develop sustainable community-based agro-enterprises, and better manage their natural resources at farmer association level within sub-counties. This will be accomplished through effective partnerships with research and development organizations and the private sector. This will lead to increased and sustained productivity, and incomes of rural communities in the selected sites through linkages of the agroenterprises to natural resource management.   Mozambique, Uganda    Africa 2000 Network (A2N), Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, Uganda Education,Environmental Foundation (UEEF),, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU)  Market Access  Eliud Birachi   
470 Scaling up livelihood impacts through farmer organization and access to market Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-07-01  2011-02-28  The overall goal of the project is to contribute towards poverty alleviation, food security, improved nutrition and better resource management in Eastern Uganda through enabling communities and their service providers to develop strategies for increased production, profitability and sustainability of competitive agro-enterprises at higher levels of organization and at sufficient scale. Uganda    Makerere University in Uganda, National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)- Uganda  Market Access  Eliud Birachi   
480 Application of isotopic techniques to enhance water use efficiencies in smallholder irrigation systems under water and nutrient limiting conditions. Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2007-09-15  2009-09-27  The overall objective of the study is to contribute to increasing water and nutrient use efficiencies in production of maize in the Shire Valley through improved management of irrigation water, improved understanding of the interaction between nutrient and water use efficiency, and application of both conventional and isotopic techniques to partition transpiration and evaporation.   Malawi      Land Management, Water Management  Jeroen Huising   
475 Breaking the unholy alliance of food insecurity, poverty and environmental degradation in representative agro-ecological zones of Malawi: Empowering farmers with soil, water and nutrient enhancing technologies for increased productivity Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2008-10-30  2011-04-29    This project will use the new, holistic Integrated Soil Fertility Management (ISFM) approach that embraces the full range of driving factors - biological, physical, chemical, social, economic and political - to evaluate and promote conservation agriculture. To overcome serious gaps in technology adoption, the project will use farmer participatory, multidisciplinary and gender oriented approaches at the watershed level. Moving away from traditional plot level approaches to a watershed approach enhances understanding of the interactions between hydrological, social,physical, chemical and biological soil-related processes. A maize-based benchmark site, Lilongwe Agricultural Development Division (ADD) with unimodal, medium rainfall has been identified for this study.   Malawi    Department of Agricultural Research an Technical Services (DARTS) - Malawi, Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research (Bioforsk)  Land Management  Saidou Koala   
483 Improving farms livelihoods through multi-stakeholder innovation platforms for linking smallholder farmers to research, extension & business development services Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-01-06  2012-06-30  To improve linkages between research, extension, NGOs and the private sector in Mozambique and to build the capacity of research and extension staff in participatory approaches for working with farmer groups in order to improve access to technical innovations and emerging market opportunities. Mozambique    Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU)  Land Management  Jeroen Huising  Nelson Mango 
485 Empowerment of Poor Farmers through Legume-Based Integrated Soil Fertility Management in Lake Victoria basin in Africa (Kenya and Tanzania) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-01-07  2011-06-30  The objective of the project is to deploy legume-based ISFM options targeting low soil fertility and Striga to alleviate constraints to high crop productivity in the Lake Victoria Basin in Kenya and Tanzania. It also aims to strengthen the capacity of farmer associations and agro-input dealers in above areas to identify major constraints and engage the knowledge and inputs needed to address these jointly and economically.   Kenya, Tanzania      Crops  Bernard VanLauwe   
487 Agreement for engagement of Agricultural Research in Africa Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-05-03  2010-12-31  Efficient water and nutrient use in cereal grains systems in market-based Conservation Agriculture systems   Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe      Crops, Ecosystem Management, Land Management  Nelson Mango  Jeroen Huising 
411 Validation of a coconut embryo culture protocol for the international exchange of germplasm Bioversity International  2009-10-15  2011-04-15  Globally, coconuts support more than 10 million sustainable livelihoods, providing materials for food and shelter; helping stabilize farming-systems, and generating income and employment. Benefits from better access to improved planting materials and management, post-harvest technologies and new marketing opportunities are likely to accrue to the poorest of rural populations, providing project strategies are explicit in this regard. Coconut is often the most viable cash crop, especially in Asia-Pacific countries such as India and the Philippines, and partly owing to its non-perishability and product-diversity. Coconut systems also allow for other cash crops to be intercropped, generating additional income. Global demand for coconut oil, and copra/ coconut oil prices have recently increased although price volatility remains a constraint. Harnessing and conserving agro-biodiversity is critical to coconut production and its future. Bioversity International continues to support the development of a progressive global strategy for conserving coconut germplasm. It aims to cost-effectively optimize conservation of as much representative diversity as possible for the short, medium and long term. Because of its large, recalcitrant seeds that exhibit no dormancy, coconut diversity is conserved in field genebanks.  Collections that represent coconut diversity are located in national and regional (5) genebanks, and in the multi-site International Coconut Genebank. The regional field genebanks are established, maintained and managed by national programmes with guidance from the International Coconut Genetic Resources Network (COGENT). This was founded by Bioversity International in 1992, as a global network of coconut producing countries, aimed at improving the production and use of coconut and the conservation of its diversity. Until recently, the only practical method for coconut ex situ conservation has been in such field genebanks, requiring a large area and substantial resources to maintain, and are subject to many risks. Many countries also lack the capacity and financial resources to maintain their collections. To ensure long-term conservation, accessions can now also be ‘cryo-preserved’, that is frozen to the temperature of liquid nitrogen (-196C). Cryopreservation arrests both the growth of plant cells and all processes of biological deterioration, so that the material can be preserved indefinitely and resuscitated into fully viable plants. The one-off cost of cryo-preserving accessions is expected to pay off against the recurrent costs of in vitro or in field maintenance over a number of years. Funded by the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the overall aim of this project is to optimize, validate and apply a standard embryo culture protocol for wide application under a variety of genotypes and conditions. The specific objectives are: To test and optimize the embryo culture through the transfer of embryos from the ICG-AIO in Côte d’Ivoire to the Philippines, Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Sri Lanka. To assess the feasibility of shipping embryos as compared to hand-carrying embryos. To produce technical guidelines for the successful exchange of coconut germplasm as embryos. To duplicate 11 threatened accessions in the ICG-AIO in other genebanks using the validated protocol to transfer embryos. An international workshop was held in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, in which participants agreed on a flexible coconut embryo culture protocol. This will help ensure greater consistency and effectiveness of future embryo culture work. Validation work and the preparation of a manual detailing a standard embryo transfer protocol are underway. As well as the safeguarding the intrinsic biodiversity value of such germplasm conservation, ultimately those depending on coconut production are likely to enjoy greater food and livelihoods’ security. Côte d'Ivoire, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Sri Lanka    Centre National de Recherche Agronomique (CNRA) - Cote d’Ivoire, Cocoa & Coconut Institute, PNG, Coconut Research Institute (CRI),Sri Lanka, Zamboanga Research Center (ZRC) of the Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA)  Agrobiodiversity, Crops, Seed Systems  Stephan Weise  Chitra Jayasekara, Florent Engelmann, Jean Louis Konan, Alfred Kembu, Mathias Gill Faure, Ramon Rivera, Vijitha Vidhanaarachchi 
110 Regional Programme: Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: Investing in Sustainable Solutions WorldFish Center  2007-04-01  2010-07-31  This Regional Programme aims at strengthening the capacity of people and agencies in Africa to develop practical, coordinated and sustainable solutions to enhance the contributions of fish and fisheries to economic and human development. In particular, the Programme is building a strategic response to HIV/AIDS in the fisheries sector that will generate benefits for vulnerable groups in wider society. Output areas under the Programme include: 1.) Improved knowledge base on the trends and risk factors of HIV/AIDS in the fisheries sector; 2.) Viable investment options to reduce vulnerability and increase mitigation capacity in the fisheries sector and generate benefits for populations at risk in wider society; 3.) Improved policies, institutions and processes for dissemination and investment in best practice. The Programme comprises two sub-regional projects, one in East and Southern Africa (with learning sites in Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Lake Victoria and DR Congo) managed by the WorldFish Center, one In West Africa (with sites in Benin, Cameroon and Nigeria) managed by FAO. WorldFish Center Zambia is responsible for overall coordination, and research-for-development activities are grouped around three technical focus areas: 1)        Options for reducing vulnerability along the fish marketing chain. Assessment of socio-economic and health trends among target groups and an analysis of contributing risk factors including the dynamics of mobility in different fisheries contexts. These assessments form the basis of pilot projects in selected learning sites along key ‘development corridors’ that will identify viable options for wider investments targeted at key constraints and development opportunities. 2)        Enhancing nutrition benefits from small-scale aquaculture and fisheries. Analysis of the nutritional value, accessibility and potential health impact of common local fish products available to poor people affected by HIV/AIDS.  A range of target groups have been selected, including urban poor, small-holder aquaculture households, people living with HIV and on ART. 3)        Stimulating institutional change to increase investment in viable support options. Analysis of institutional opportunities and constraints in the context of decentralization, national HIV/AIDS and fisheries policy formulation and food security planning in order to generate lessons for improving integration of fisheries, HIV/AIDS and wider health policy processes. Learning and models generated under the Programme are being shared widely and used to inform policy and development efforts in the African region and beyond. A Policy Advisory Group (PAG) comprising senior representatives of national governments, Regional Economic Communities, AU/NEPAD and leading technical agencies in the region, has been established to advise the Programme on regional linkages for policy impact and direction for expansion and dissemination of Programme results. Benin, Cameroon, Congo Dem. Rep., Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Uganda, Zambia  2009-2011|IFPRI|SUBTHEME+4.1, 2009-2011|WorldFish|WORLDFISH-6  Department of Fisheries Resources (DFR) - Entebbe, Uganda, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Kenneth Kaunda Children of Africa Foundatoin (KKCAF), Lake Victoria Fisheries Organisation (LVFO), Makerere University - Department of Food Science and Technology, Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security (MoAFS), Malawi, Ministry of Fisheries - Department of Planning and Cooperation - IDPPE - Mozambique, Overseas Development Group - University of East Anglia - UK, Uganda AIDS Commission, University of Lubumbashi - Centre Interdisciplinaire pour le Developpement et Education Permanente (CIDEP), University of Lubumbashi - Cliniques Universitaires, University of Malawi, Bunda College of Agriculture, University of Malawi, Chancellor College, University of Zambia, World Vision DRC, World Vision Malawi, Zambia Fisheries Department   Aquaculture, Fisheries, Policy & Institutions  Saskia Husken  Edward Hugh Allison, Joseph Nagoli, Simon Heck, Saskia Husken 
468 Improving farms livelihoods through multi-stakeholder innovation platforms for linking smallholder farmers to research, extension & business development services Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2009-06-01  2012-11-30  To improve linkages between research, extension, NGOs and the private sector in Mozambique and to build the capacity of research and extension staff in participatory approaches for working with farmer groups in order to improve access to technical innovations and emerging market opportunities. Mozambique    Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU)  Crops, Market Access  Jeroen Huising  Nelson Mango 
467 The Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa (SASHA) Centro Internacional de la Papa  2009-08-04  2014-07-31  The Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa (SASHA) is a 5-year initiative designed to improve the food security and livelihoods of poor families in Sub-Saharan Africa by exploiting the untapped potential of sweetpotato. It will develop the essential capacities, products, and methods to reposition sweetpotato in food economies of Sub-Saharan African countries to alleviate poverty and under nutrition, particularly among poor women and children.SASHA is a project of the International Potato Center (CIP). As part of the broader, 10-year, multi-donor Sweetpotato for Profit and Health Initiative, the SASHA project is expected to set the groundwork for improving the lives of 10 million Sub-Saharan households in 10 years. Program components IMPROVED QUALITY AND RANGE OF AVAILABLE VARIETIES The focus of this component is on breeding a wide range of varieties with the combinations of traits suited to agro-ecological conditions and to consumer and producer demands. The point is to create an integrated breeding system akin to the one that exists for cereal breeding, but focused on the producer and consumer preferences of resource-poor women and children. BREEDING WEEVIL-RESISTANT SWEETPOTATOES This component draws on biotechnology to develop weevil-resistant sweetpotato varieties for Sub-Saharan Africa. Sweetpotato weevils are the most important sweetpotato pest in the world – responsible for crop losses ranging from 60 to nearly 100% during pronounced drought. This situation may be critical during dry periods when sweetpotato is sometimes the only food available. With climate change predictions of an expanding dry season in Sub-Saharan Africa, the urgency of developing resistance to weevils will likely intensify. DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE SEED SYSTEMS The access to and maintenance of quality planting material is a struggle for smallholder farmers. This component involves developing and testing strategies to ensure effective multiplication, dissemination, and exchange of disease-free vines from which new plants will be propagated. It involves strategies to more efficiently link farmers with public sector distribution programs and integrate those with for-profit nurseries. It will examine which strategies assure women the best access to vines and whether women are as successful as men at commercially-oriented vine production. PROOF-OF-CONCEPT PROJECTS This series of projects will examine broader institutional or market level issues affecting crop production, markets, potential market expansion (e.g., use of sweetpotato as animal feed), and scalable approaches for improving nutrition with sweetpotato. These projects will evaluate options that influence the capacity to scale up and achieve the outcomes on poverty and nutrition that are planned for the years following SASHA, in the longer, ten-year initiative. Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Congo Dem. Rep., Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia    2.5 Agro-Technologies Limited (AGT) , Agricultural Research Council (ARC), South Africa, Appropriate Rural Development Agriculture Programme (ARDAP), Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Community Research in Environment and Development Initiatives (CREADIS), CRI, Danforth Plant Science, Hellen Keller International, HKI, Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Rwanda (ISAR), Rwanda, Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Services (KEPHIS), Kenyatta University, Lake Zone Agricultural Research and Development Institute (LZARDI) - Ukiriguru - Tanzania, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, Mikocheni Research Station, National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)- Uganda, Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH), SINA Gerard/Entreprise URWIBUTSO, University of Greenwich, UK (Lead institute), University of Nairobi, University of Puerto Rico mayaz (UPRM), University of Toronto, Canada, University of Valencia  Crops, Market Access, Seed Systems  Jan Low   
451 Harnessing Opportunities for Productivity Enhancement (HOPE) of Sorghum and Millets in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2009-07-15  2013-06-30  This Project seeks to take an integrated value-chain approach that harnesses market “pull” linked to increased production potential from technologies to stimulate the production of sorghum and millets in selected target areas representative of major sorghum and millet production zones. By integrating various actors across and within the input-supply, production, sale/storage, and marketing stages of the value chain in these locations, the project is capturing synergies and reducing transaction costs, resulting in large increases in yield, production, profitability and competitiveness for dryland cereal crops.Project activities are enabling and driving changes for the participants in the value chain. Focusing in carefully-selected target areas that provide a large opportunity to alleviate food insecurity and poverty in West/Central Africa, Eastern/Southern Africa and South Asia, this project is aiming at discovering, developing and delivering improved technologies for producing three major dryland cereal crops: sorghum, pearl millet, and finger millet. Organizations providing seed, fertilizer, credit, and know-how are being interlinked with producers, buyers, and marketers so that increased production is enabled by essential inputs, and driven by market demand. Synergies between improved crop varieties and fertilizer, farmer participation, and gender equity are receiving particular emphasis in the project implementation stage. In its first 4 years, the project aims to increase farmer yields by 30% or more, benefiting 110,000 households in sub-Saharan Africa and 90,000 in South Asia through increased food security and incomes. Within ten years the project is aiming at benefitting 1.1 million households in sub-Saharan Africa and 1.0 million in South Asia. Burkina Faso, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda    Action Contre la Faim (ACF),Niger, Africa Harvest Biotechnology Foundation,Kenya and South Africa, All-India Coordinated Pearl Millet Improvement Project,(AICPMIP)India, Amhara Regional Agricultural Research Institute (ARARI), Association d'Eveil au Developpement Durable(AMEDD),Mali, Association des Organisations des Paysans, Association Minim Song Panga (AMSP),Burkina Faso , CCS Haryana Agricultural University (CCSHAU),Hisar, Department of Research and Development (DRD) - Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security - Tanzania, Eastern African Grain Council (EAGC),Kenya, Egerton University,Kenya, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), Federation des Paysans Semenciers du burkina Faso(FePaB),Burkina faso , Fuma Gaskiya,Niger, Institut d’Economie Rural (IER), Mali, Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Burkina Faso, Institut de Recherches Agronomiques du Niger (INRAN), Niger, Institute for Agricultural research ,Nigeria, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kenya seed company, Lake Chad Research Institute, Nigeria, Mahatma Phule Krishi Vidyapeeth,Rahuri,India, Marathwada Agricultural University,Parbhani,India, Ministry of Agriculture,Government of Southern Sudan (GoSS), Namburi seeds - Tanzania, National Agricultural Advisory services (NAADS) ,Uganda, National Agricultural Research Institute (NARI), Eritrea, National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)- Uganda, National Research Centre for Sorghum(NRCS),India, Professionel (AOPP),Mali, Union Albarka de Bokki,Niamey, Union des Groupements des Producteurs pour la Commercialisation Agricole(UGPCA),Burkina Faso, Union FAHAMAYE de Dantchiandou,Niamey, Union Harey-Bane de Tera,Niamey, Union Made-Bane de Falwel,Niamey, Victoria seeds,Uganda, Zanobia Seeds - Tanzania  Crops, Market Access, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems, Soils  Said Silim  George Okwach 
456 Mobilisation and Empowerment of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises Involved in the Non-Timber Forest Products in Central Africa World Agroforestry Centre  2010-01-01  2010-12-31  This project aims at increasing the rural populations' revenues, through empowerment in terms of entrepreneurship, and sustainable management of natural resources in a favourable institutional environment. Project activities are as follows:1. Business plan of nurseries on the pilot sites2. Creating and strengthening the nurseries on the pilot sites3. Developing the integration of improved plants in the existing agroforestry systems4. Initiating trainings in PFNL domestication on the new pilot sites in the Far-North, the North and the North-West5. Follow-up of the constructed nurseries6. Training in domestication and construction of nurseriesThe expected outcomes are as follows:1. The empowerment of small and medium size forest production companies is enhanced2. The priority branches of the non-timber forest products (NTFP) sector is developed3. The techniques for a sustainable management of NTFP are reinforced, notably those for harvest and domestication4.The institutional and legal frameworks are adapted to the functioning of NTFP actors in Central Africa. Cameroon, Congo Dem. Rep.      Agrobiodiversity, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Market Access, Policy & Institutions, Seed Systems  Zac Tchoundjeu  Anne Degrande 
466 Architecture of REALU: Reducing Emissions for All Land Use (Phase II) World Agroforestry Centre  2010-01-01  2012-12-31  The Goal of the Project is to develop through action research, a set of approaches, methodologies and national capacities to implement effective landscape-based strategies for reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation( REDD).The Purpose of the Project is to develop fair and efficient financial co-investment in effective approaches to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from land use in tropical countries Cameroon, Indonesia, Peru, Vietnam      Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Peter Minang   
129 Effective Grain Storage for Better Livelihoods of African Farmers Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo  2008-07-01  2010-12-31  The Long term goal of the project is to have  Increased and more secure incomes and reduced vulnerability of resource-poor rural maize producers in sub-Saharan Africa through the implementation of a sustainable long-term (10-year) program which provides affordable and effective on-farm storage technologies to an increasing number of African smallholders. Objectives of the 2008 - 2010 Pilot phase Objective 1: Assess the potential for the implementation of the metal silo approach within the ESA maize belt (Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe) Objective 2: In two countries, select pilot areas for the implementation of metal silo manufacturing to assess scale-out potential of the technology Objective 3: Identify in-country lead organizations (NGO, private sector) to implement training of instructors/manufacturers and manufacturing of silos in pilot areas Objective 4 : In collaboration with SDC, support South-South knowledge transfer from Central America to pilot areas Objective 5: Assess the economics of maize storage and storage pest control measures in pilot areas Objective 6: Assess micro-economics of metal silo production (among manufacturers) and purchase (among farmers) in pilot areas Objective 7: Advise on scale-out potential of technology to other areas and countries in ESA Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe  2009-2011|CIMMYT|3  Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), World Vision Malawi  Crops, Market Access  Tadele Tefera  Fred Kanampiu, Hugo De Groote, Jonathan Hellin 
134 Maize Resistant to Stem Borer and Storage Insect Pests for Eastern and Southern Africa Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo  2009-01-31  2014-04-01  The Insect Resistant Maize for Africa (IRMA) project has been supporting resource poor farmers to increase their maize crop yield, and reduce the loss from storage pests. Currently in its third phase, the project’s formal title is:  ‘Developing Maize Resistant to Stem Borer and Storage Insect Pests for Eastern and Southern Africa - IRMA III Conventional (2009-2013)’ Running from 2009–2013, this phase is funded by the Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture, and will focus on developing and deploying conventional maize that is resistant to field and storage insect pests, for East and Southern Africa (ESA). Objective 1: Develop insect resistant maize varieties for the major Kenyan production systems and insect pests; Objective 2: Establish procedures to provide insect resistant maize to resource- poor farmers in Kenya; Objective 3: Assess the impact of insect resistant maize varieties in Kenyan agricultural systems; Objective 4: Transfer technologies to and Kenya to develop, evaluate, disseminate, and monitor insect resistant maize varieties; and Objective 5: Plan, monitor, and document project processes and achievements for dissemination to other developing countries. The project will concentrate on ESA countries where insect pests have the greatest impact on maize production, food and income security, and livelihoods. It will give a relative greater emphasis of post-harvest pests (70%) over stem borers (30%) and will focus on the major maize producing countries with significant areas in affected zones. Of particular interest are Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. These countries have a total population of more than 190 million people, which is projected to rise to 230 million by 2015. Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe  2009-2011|CIMMYT|3  Bunda college of Agriculture,University of Malawi,Malawi, Chitedze Research Station,Malawi, Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO)- Uganda, Selian Agricultural Research Institute (SARI) - Tanzania, Zambia Agriculture Research Institute (ZARI)  Crops  Stephen Mugo  Tadele Tefera, Yoseph Beyene 
465 Sustainable Catchment Management and Sediment Control in the Lake Tanganyika Catchment Basin. World Agroforestry Centre  2010-05-01  2012-09-30  In this project, ICRAF will assist in providing advice and training on sustainable catchment management and sediment control in the Lake Tanganyika catchment basin, in the framework of UNDP/GEF project on Partnership Interventions for Implementation of the Strategic Action Programme for Lake Tanganyika (SAP).Specifically, ICRAF will contribute towards the acheivement of Outcome 3 of the SAP for Lake Tanganyika: Sediment discharge reduced from demonstration catchment management sites, providing significant livelihood benefits to local people, and seeking long-term adaptation measures to changing climatic regimes.Through a participatory process with focus on local communities, ICRAF will provide support for the following activities.1. Contributing to the development of best practice demonstrations sites within national focal areas and providing advisory inputs for best practice in catchment management.2. Organizing and delivering short training courses and strengthening capacity on sustainable land/catchment management.3. Linking catchment management to erosion/sediment monitoring.4. Offering advice on mitigation of climate change impacts.5. Documenting and disseminating best practice within regional newsletters, brochures, and bulletins. Tanzania      Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Forestry & Agroforestry, Land Management, Policy & Institutions, Soils, Water Management  Fergus Sinclair  Adrian Radcliffe 
464 Japan Capacity Building Program for African Agricultural Researchers World Agroforestry Centre  2010-09-26  2010-10-16  In this program, ICRAF will implement a training programme on the Japan Capacity Building program for African Agricultural Researchers for Fiscal Year 2010. The title of the training is: Transfering skills to develop and apply soio-economic assessment tools for sustainable land management projects.Miyuki Iiyama (ICRAF) has been collaborating with researchers of ISAR (Institut des Science Agronomique du Rwanda) on Sustainable Land Management (SLM) project in Rwanda, which aims at the national capacity building of disseminating and up-scaling sustainable land management, including radical and progressive terraces. This training aims at developing capacity of Rwandese researchers: • to design protocols for cost-benefit analysis and valuations of eco-system services• to apply the tools for data collection, analyses, and compilation • to develop user-friendly manuals to further disseminate and upscale the system of knowledge to wider national stakeholders. Kenya      Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Policy & Institutions  Miyuki Iiyama   
463 Controlling Avian Flu and Protecting People’s Livelihoods in Africa and Indonesia International Food Policy Research Institute  2007-06-01  2010-12-31  There is considerable uncertainty about timing, extent, and severity of a potential animal disease outbreak such as HPAI, yet developing countries must make critical decisions about ways to defend against a potential outbreak. Disease and control measures can have differential economic impacts on different income groups and sectors. Not all stakeholders may have the same incentive to implement/pay for control strategies for a variety of reasons. The question then is how do we choose optimal risk management efforts to reduce the risk? The aim of this project is to increase knowledge of available methods and technologies to reduce the risk of HPAI, their effectiveness, costs, benefits, and to identify constraints to their adoption and appropriate incentives needed to ensure their use along the poultry value chains. The project has 5 workstreams: disease risk, livelihood impacts, institutional mechanism, evaluation of risk management options, and risk communication. Ethiopia, Ghana, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria    International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)  Livestock, Market Access  Clare Narrod  Devesh Roy, Marites Tiongco, Thomas Randolph 
462 Optimizing livelihood and environmental benefits from crop residues in smallholder crop-livestock system in South Asia regional case study Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo  2010-01-01  2011-12-31  Smallholders in mixed crop-livestock systems constitute a very large fraction of farming enterprises in developing countries. In those systems, crop residues (CR) are a strategic production component: their use can be split into animal feeding, construction material, cooking fuel, mulch remaining (sometimes burnt) in the field. Mixed crop-livestock systems are very dynamic and are evolving rapidly in response to external drivers such as demographic pressure, development of urban markets and increased demand for crop and livestock products, climate variability and change. In addition, the recent interest for bio-fuel production exacerbates further the pressure on biomass in production systems. This study aims at better understanding the tradeoffs in crop residue uses in cereal based systems in South Asia region on wheat/rice based system. The major tradeoff in most system is the short term benefits of using crop residues to feed livestock versus leaving the crop residues in the field to improve soil productivity (nutrient balance, erosion control, and soil health). The study focuses on the decision making processes at the farm/household level and will capture the diversity/contrasts and recent changes in CR uses at various scales in order to better target technical, institutional and policy options to improve livelihood without compromising long term system sustainability. Bangladesh, India  2010-2012|ILRI|ILRI-5  International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Wheat Research Centre (Bangladesh)  Crops, Livestock, Soils  Meera Bhatia  Arindam Samaddar, Braja Swain, Diego Valbuena, Lieven Claessens, Mariana Rufino, Mark vanWijk, Nils Teufel, Olaf Erenstein, Vijesh Krishna 
81 Index Based Livestock Insurance: The Marsabit Pilot International Livestock Research Institute  2008-01-01  2012-12-31  Overview: Over the past year, ILRI in collaboration with various partners has pursued a comprehensive research agenda aimed at designing, developing and implementing market mediated index-based insurance products to protect livestock keepers from drought related asset losses they face, particularly those in the drought prone Arid and Semi Arid Lands(ASAL). For pastoralists whose livelihoods rely solely or partly on livestock, the resulting high livestock mortality rate has devastating effects on asset levels, rendering them amongst vulnerable populations in Kenya. Index-based insurance products represent a promising and exciting innovation that could allow the benefits of insurance to protect the climate-related risks that vulnerable rural smallholder farmers and livestock keepers face. Because index insurance is based on the realization of an outcome that cannot be influenced by insurers or policy holders (such as the amount and distribution of rainfall over a season), it has relatively simple and transparent structure. This makes such products easier to administer and consequently to more cost-effective to develop, and trade. Indeed the success of several pilot programs conducted in India, and various countries in Africa and Latin America, have proven the feasibility and affordability of such products. Much of the initial phase of the project, which included an extensive program of field work and stakeholder consultation, is now complete. The research has generated useful insights that have been used in the design of index-based livestock insurance(IBLI) products that is better targeted to the various needs of the expected clientele. Currently, an IBLI contract has been modelled, priced, tested among the target clientele and is now ready for implementation. ILRI in collaboration with partners from the public, private and non-profit sectors now plans to pilot IBLI contracts for the long rain/long dry season scanning March 2010 to September 2010 in Marsabit district. Objectives: To effectively introduce index-based livestock insurance products to pastoral and agro-pastoral populations to help them manage drought-related livestock mortality. To learn and document the effectiveness of use of index-based livestock insurance as a tool for managing weather related perils and to incorporate lessons-learned in efforts to upscale the pilot for national rollout. Duration: 5 Years Location: Marsabit district, Kenya Expected Outputs: The expected outputs, aimed at catalyzing a commercially sustainable market for index-based livestock insurance, and understanding its possible role as a productive safety net within a larger social protection program are: Publications that offer insight into the conditions in which market-mediated IBLI products are possible IBLI products designed and related publications detailing design methods IBLI product piloted in Marsabit district The impact of IBLI adoption studied and detailed in publications. Expected Outcome The economic and social returns to an effective program that insures pastoral and agro-patoral population against drought-induced livestock losses can be substantial as it is expected to: Stabilize asset accumulation and enhance economic growth Crowd-in finance for ancillary investment and growth Stem the downward spiral of vulnerable household into poverty Technical Partners: Cornell University Index Insurance Innovation Initiative (I4) Syracuse University (Maxwell School) University of Wisconsin (BASIS Research Program) Implementing Partners: Equity Insurance Agency UAP Insurance Limited Financial Sector Deepening (FSD) Kenya Kenya Meteorological Department Ministry of Development of Northen Kenya and other Arid Lands Ministry of Livestock Donors: Financial Sector Deepening (FSD) Kenya / DFID USAID World Bank Kenya  2009-2011|ILRI|ILRI-1  Cornell University, Syracuse University, University of California-Davis  Livestock, Policy & Institutions  Andrew Mude  Munenobu Ikegami 
459 N3 – Targeting and scaling out International Livestock Research Institute  2010-01-05  2012-01-04  This Challenge Program on Water and Food(CPWF) project is about matching technologies (or whole strategies) with environments. It has been shown that “blanket” Rainwater Management Strategies(RMS) are often inappropriate. One size does not, as they say, fit all. Strategies for upper slopes are likely to be different than those for lower slopes. The suitability of technologies may be influenced by altitude, rainfall patterns, landscape position, soil type, access to input and product markets, crop-livestock interactions, the extent of community integration, the attitudes of local authorities, the presence of NGOs and other develop organizations – and many other factors.This project will aim to identify the conditions – biophysical and institutional – that favour the use of particular sets of practices, then scan the landscape to find out where else these conditions prevail. That is, this project will help identify the “conditionality” of recommendations. Sometimes these conditions may be amenable to mapping, as when altitude is a determining factor. Some the conditions will be difficult or impossible to map, as when community integration is a determining factor.rainwater management Ethiopia    Amhara Regional Agricultural Research Institute (ARARI), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Oromia Agricultural Research Institute (OARI), Ethiopia  Water Management  An Notenbaert   
458 N2 – Integrated rainwater management strategies – technologies, institutions and policies International Water Management Institute  2010-03-01  2013-12-31  Integrated rainwater management strategies combine technologies, policies and institutions. Work in this Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) project will aim to integrate land and water management, crop component technology, crop management, crop livestock systems, pastoral systems and even agroforestry systems so as to raise productivity and incomes and enhance resilience, while slowing land degradation and reducing downstream siltation. It is clear, however, that the shape of policies and institutions can foster or discourage farmer adoption of productivity-increasing, resource-conserving strategies. This project will also examine the extent to which policy change and institutional strengthening and reform can combine with new technologies to spur widespread innovation. It will look into micro-credit, cooperative societies, land tenure, collective action in communities, and the various roles of formal and informal institutions, as part of integrated strategies to improve rainwater management. Ethiopia    International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)  Water Management  Bharat Sharma  Bharat Sharma, Deborah Bossio, Katherine Snyder, Lisa-Maria Rebelo, Matthew McCartney, Seleshi Bekele 
461 N5 -Coordination and multi-stakeholder platforms International Livestock Research Institute  2010-01-05  2013-01-12  The Basin Develpment Challange (BDC) is a research-for-development program, organized in five interdependent projects led by a Basin Leader. This Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) project helps the BDC projects conduct quality, coherent and problem-oriented research that will contribute to beneficial change in the basin. Therefore, the success of the Project depends not only on its own project team but also excellent cooperation with the other projects in the BDC. The Project and the Basin Leader are responsible for five main areas:1. Coordination and quality of research2. Fostering Change3. Communications4. Adaptive management5. Innovation Research Ethiopia    Amhara Regional Agricultural Research Institute (ARARI), Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR), International Water Management Institute (IWMI)  Water Management  Tilahun Amede   
460 N4 – Assessing and anticipating consequences of innovation International Water Management Institute  2010-03-01  2013-12-31  This Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) project is about showing whether RMSs are effective. It will seek to quantify the consequences of improved rainwater management strategies(RMS) for community livelihoods, resource productivity, land quality, and downstream water quality and siltation. It will specifically measure the downstream, cross-scale consequences of successful innovation in the Ethiopian highlands. To what extent are Sudan and Egypt affected by improved RMS in Ethiopia?This project will develop methods to anticipate ex ante the likely consequences of introducing improved RMS as well as monitoring and measuring these consequences ex post. Finally, it will introduce methods for adaptive management, so that RMS can continue to benefit from lessons already learned.Assessing and anticipating the consequences of improved RMS will cover a range of variables, among them water allocation, land and water use practices, community infrastructure, water productivity, farm income, livelihoods resilience and ecosystem services. Ethiopia    ENTRO, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), SEI  Water Management  Charlotte MacAlister  Amare Haileslassie, Daniel Fuka, Essayas Kaba Ayana, Gerba Leta, Getnet Kindie, Ranjitha Puskur, Seleshi Bekele, Solomon Seyoum, Seifu Admassu Tilahun, Teklu Erkossa, Tammo S Steenhuis, Yenenesh Abebe 
424 Models for Implementing Multiple-Use Water Supply Systems for Enhanced Land and Water Productivity, Rural Livelihoods and Gender Equity – Multiple Use Systems (MUS) International Water Management Institute  2004-06-15  2009-05-01    Multiple-use water services (MUS) is an innovative approach to water services. It unlocks new investment opportunities for poverty reduction and gender equity in peri-urban and rural areas. MUS takes people’s multiple water needs as the starting point of planning and design of new systems and upgrades. Universally, water users already use ‘domestic’ systems or ‘irrigation’ systems for multiple purposes, whether legal or not. By planning for these multiple uses, many more benefits from investments in infrastructure can be realized: health, freedom from domestic chores, food and income and gender equity. The CPWF's MUS project, supported by the Challenge Program on Water and Food (CP28) pioneered the implementation of MUS and scaling up of MUS at intermediate, national and global levels. Global partners were IWMI International Water Management Institute (lead institution), IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre and IDE International Development Enterprise. Learning alliances were established with 150 governments and other institutions in the basins of the Andes (Bolivia and Colombia), Indus-Ganges (India, Nepal), Limpopo (South Africa and Zimbabwe), Mekong (Thailand), and Nile (Ethiopia). Global advocacy in collaboration with the MUS Group ensured that MUS obtained a place in the policy agendas of professional networks, such as the World Water Forums, and of international governmental and non-governmental water agencies, rural development and financing organizations. Project partners included local water user movements, NGOs, the domestic sub-sector, the irrigation sub-sector, and local government. From these diverse backgrounds, project partners innovated two successful MUS models: homestead-scale MUS and community-scale MUS. Homestead-scale MUS: 50 – 200 litres per capita per day Whenever water is available near homes and on adjoining lands, or ‘homesteads’, people use such water for domestic and many productive uses. This empirical relationship between water uses and availability is depicted in the ‘multiple-use water ladder’. The policy recommendation is to enable poor people ‘to climb the water ladder’ and to provide 50-200 liters per capita per day. Out of this, 3-5 liters per capita per day should be safe for drinking. Income generated enable repayment of most multiple-use systems investments within three years. Homestead-scale MUS is especially beneficial for women, who are disproportionately responsible for domestic water supplies and tend to have a stronger say over homestead production. The land-poor, who only have access to homestead land, also benefit. Community-scale MUS: local-level integrated water resource management Here MUS takes communities as entry point of water services. It holistically considers their multiple water uses (domestic, irrigation, animal watering, tree-growing, fisheries, enterprises, ceremonies, environment) from multiple water sources (rain, surface water, groundwater, wetlands) at multiple sites (homesteads, fields, open access). This integrated water resource management at the local level is (potentially) considerably more cost-effective and sustainable than single-use water services. Bolivia, Colombia, Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa, Thailand, Zimbabwe    International Development Enterprises - Bangladesh, International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC)   Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Barbara Van Koppen  Barbara Van Koppen, Eline Boelee, Regassa Namara, Sylvie Morardet, Yogesh Bhatt 
425 Enhancing Rainwater and Nutrient Use Efficiency for Improved Crop Productivity, Farm Income and Rural Livelihoods in the Volta Basin International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2004-06-15  2009-12-14  The CPWF's project objective was to integrate water use efficiency, soil and nutrient management, and improved germplasm in a systems approach addressing major constraints in agricultural and water productivity of rain fed agriculture, with a focus on marketing, policy and participatory approaches to empower poor small-scale farmers who rely on rain-fed agriculture in the Volta basin. This was achieved by •        evaluating and adapting best bet technologies that improve water and nutrient use efficiencies and increase crop productivity in partnership with farmers, •        using the Decision Support System for Agricultural Technology Transfer (DSSAT) to analyze the effect of microdosage, mineral fertilizer in sorghum cultivation in two management systems, and train project partners in its use, and •        testing with the farmers the warrantage or inventory credit system for warehousing of farm products, which allows farmers to benefit from micro-credits The project thus achieved in Burkina Faso and Ghana, to stimulate and strengthen farmers based associations and community based organizations to collaborate with researchers and other stakeholders. Strengthening the research-extension-farmer linkage provided a good foundation for enhancing the adoption of new and promising technologies. And it could establish strategic alliances between key stakeholders including NGOs, Government staff, extension units, farmers’ organizations, private sectors and other research organizations to promote ‘best bet’ crop, water, and nutrient management strategies for scaling up and out across the Volta Basin. In conclusion the study on farmers’ perception highlighted three major strengths: 1.      the technologies (varieties and fertilizers) are adapted to the agro-climatic conditions, which ensures good yields; 2.      the technical/field protocols do not constitute anymore a constraint to the adoption of technologies; 3.      at the community level, sharing of seeds constitutes a major driver for the increase in agricultural production and dissemination at larger scale Burkina Faso, Ghana    Centre for Development Research (ZEF) - Germany, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), DELFT -TU, the Netherland, Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles (INERA), Burkina Faso, Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Semi-Arid Food Grains Research and Development (SAFGRAD), United Nations University (UNU)  Crops, Market Access, Water Management  DOUGBEDJI FATONDJI   
423 Wetlands-Based Livelihoods in the Limpopo Basin: Balancing Social Welfare and Environmental Security International Water Management Institute  2004-06-15  2008-08-31    The research was motivated by the dependency of many people on wetlands for their livelihoods. It was therefore founded on the basis that the potential of wetlands to contribute to livelihoods is closely related to their ability to maintain ecosystem functions (such as regulating river flows), which is a consequence of their unique hydrological characteristics. The research aimed to contribute to wetland management and ultimately contribute towards ensuring environmental sustainability (MDG7) through the maintenance of vital ecosystem services provided sustainable agricultural practices (in terms of sound hydrological and pollution management) and balanced exploitation of resources are practised. The CPWF project aimed to contribute to enhancing food security and improving the livelihoods of wetland-dependent communities by increasing productivity of water and optimizing and maintaining wetland ecosystem services. Specifically the project aimed to -          Develop and apply a trade-offs based framework for making decisions about allocations of wetland resources to specific uses, including agriculture. -          Determine the trade-offs among different agricultural uses of wetland water and the trade-offs between each of the agricultural water uses and environmental use; develop guidelines on acceptable levels of wetland water use for agriculture; and encourage this as best practice. -          Identify as part of the trade-off analysis who benefits, e.g., poor women and men farmers, herders, fisher folk; local business people; etc. -          Enhanced capacity of wetland users, researchers, extension officers, natural resource managers, and policy makers. The most important achievements of the project are the new knowledge and tools captured in the three main outputs of the project – the Framework for inventory, the WETSYS tradeoff model, and the Guidelines for sustainable management - and the partnership and capacity building that resulted from implementation of the project that provide the basis for impact. The project did an analysis in case study wetlands as presented in various reports and MSc thesis and produced a synthesis, the Guideline for sustainable wetland management and utilization. Various local extension officers and natural resource managers were directly engaged with the project.  New information was disseminated to higher level decision makers, and feedback workshops to the communities that served the purpose of increasing awareness of wetland value, goods and services. Mozambique, South Africa, Zimbabwe    IRD, University of Eduardo Mondlane,Mozambique, University of Zimbabwe  Ecosystem Management, Water Management  Mutsa Masiyandima  Barbara Van Koppen, Mutsa Masiyandima, Matthew McCartney, Sylvie Morardet 
418 Integrating Knowledge from Computational Modeling with Multi-Stakeholder Governance: Towards More Secure Livelihoods through Improved Tools for Integrated River Basin Management International Food Policy Research Institute  2004-06-15  2008-12-31  In recent years, multi-stakeholder governance structures, such as River Basin Management Boards, have gained increasing importance for the management of water resources. To become more effective in their decision-making, such platforms benefit from access to policy-relevant information about the bio-physical and the socio-economic parameters that determine the opportunities and challenges of water use. In particular, they benefit from information about the economic, social and environmental impacts of different development and management options for water resources. In recent years, there have been major advances in developing bio-economic models that can provide such information by combining hydrological, agronomic and economic information for the simulation of different policy scenarios. Agent-based models, which capture the interaction of different water users, are a particularly promising approach in this regard. Yet, prior to the project, they had hardly been applied to inform multi-stakeholder decision bodies in charge of river basin management. The CPWF project aimed at contributing to the overall goal of managing land and water resources in river basins in an economically efficient, environmentally sustainable and socially acceptable way by developing integrated simulation models in close collaboration with multiple stakeholders and by promoting their use as decision-tools in multi-stakeholder governance systems. The project pursued the following three objectives:1.   To analyze multi-stakeholder governance structures;2.   To use agent-based modeling techniques for the development of decision-support tools that can be applied to simulate policy scenarios, while taking both biophysical and socio-economic information into account; and3.    To use these models as decision-tools for planning processes in multi-governance structures and to monitor their use.  The research under this project was conducted in two river basins: The White Volta Basin, located in the Upper East Region of Ghana for an early stage of river basin development and the Maule Basin in Chile for an advanced stage. For the analysis of governance structures, the team combined different methods: Interviews with experts and focus groups were used for an initial assessment with visits to selected communities. An innovative method called Net-Map was developed, which combines social network analysis with participatory mapping techniques to assess governance structures and support the organizational development of the White Volta Basin Board.  For the development of decision-support tools, the Mathematical Programming Based Multi-Agent System (MP-MAS) was applied, which is a multi-agent model of land use change developed at Hohenheim University. MP-MAS simulates the interactions of farm households with other households and the biophysical environment. The software combines household models with crop growth models and hydrological models. Household and community-level surveys were carried out in Chile and Ghana to generate data for MP-MAS. The surveys also provided in-depth studies on specific governance problems, using econometric methods. Stakeholder workshops were held regularly to ensure that the tools could be developed and validated in close interaction with the concerned stakeholders. Chile, Ghana    Center for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle (UFZ), University of Hohenheim, Germany, University of Legon, Ghana - Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER), University of Texas (UT), Water Research Institute, Ghana  Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Regina Birner   
415 Small Multi-purpose Reservoirs Ensemble Planning International Water Management Institute  2004-06-15  2008-12-31  People living in arid areas with highly variable rainfall, experience droughts and floods and often have insecure livelihoods. Small multi-purpose reservoirs are a widely used form of infrastructure for the provision of water. They supply water for domestic use, livestock watering, small scale irrigation, and other beneficial uses. The reservoirs are hydrologically linked by the streams that have been dammed. Although reservoir ensembles store enough water to have a significant impact on the livelihoods of smallholders who use them, they have rarely been considered as systems, with synergies and tradeoffs resulting from the number and density of their structures. Often reservoirs were constructed in a series of projects funded by different agencies, at different times, with little or no coordination among the implementing partners. That a significant number are functioning sub-optimally and/or are falling into disrepair indicates that there is room for improvement in the planning, operation, and maintenance of small reservoirs. The water management institutions in Volta, Limpopo, and Sao Francisco Basins are being revamped to better serve their constituencies. The CPWF project used this opportunity to collaborate with government officials, stakeholders, and farmers who are actively looking for ways to improve the planning process. The project had a two paired objectives. The basin/watershed level objective was to promote and support the planning, development, and management of small reservoir ensembles. Planning reservoirs at this scale limits conflicts over water, markets, and other resources and minimizes undesirable environmental interactions among the reservoirs. The local/community level objective was to support use of small multi-purpose reservoirs that are properly located, well designed, operated and maintained in sustainable fashion, and economically viable while assuring they improve the livelihoods of the local residents. The multi-disciplinary project team worked with planners, decision makers and farmers in an iterative, consultative process to develop tools appropriate for the use of the stakeholders. By harmonizing the interests of individuals served by small multi-purpose reservoirs and other people living in the basin they reached their paired goals: 1) to maintain water related ecosystem services, the long-term sustainability of local water supplies, and adequate downstream flows as we make use of small reservoirs and 2) to improve food security at the household level and increase sustainable livelihoods through the provision of those small multi-purpose reservoirs. The small reservoirs team developed a toolkit with tools that fall into four thematic areas: 1) planning, 2) water storage and hydrology, 3) ecosystems and human health, and 4) institutions and economics. The tools themselves are project outputs. Some of the tools are already being used by people associated with the project. The toolkit is comprehensive, however, as these first tools are used and improved, it is anticipated that new tools applicable to other social and biophysical environments will be added to the toolkit making it of increasing value to more and more stakeholders. Brazil, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Zimbabwe    Cornell University, DELFT -TU, the Netherland, EMBRAPA-Brazil, Ghana Water Research Institute (CSIR-WRI), IRD, IWMI, Ethiopia, SEI, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe  Climate Change, Ecosystem Management, Policy & Institutions, Water Management  Marc Andreini  Eline Boelee, Marc Andreini 
427 Improving Water Productivity of Cereals and Food Legumes in the Atbara River Basin of Eritrea International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas  2004-07-15  2010-04-30  Eritrea is among the ten poorest countries in the world. In 1997, two-thirds of its population (2.2 million people) were undernourished, and 40 percent of children under the age of five were suffering from malnutrition. The war with Ethiopia and the droughts and famines that affected the country in the 1970s, 1980s, and more recently in 2002 have resulted in major disruption and population movement, especially in rural areas. The agricultural support network is in a state of disrepair, food production has dropped to about 40 percent over the last decade, and the technology base has changed little over the last 30 years. Agriculture is affected by recurrent droughts. A sixth of the Eritrea population, or more than 0.6 million people, live within the Mereb-Gash and Tekeze-Setit basins. There is considerable potential to develop the agriculture sector by increasing the water productivity of crops in Eritrea. A multidisciplinary team will be assembled involving the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), the CGIAR Systemwide Program on Participatory Research and Gender Analysis (PRGA Program) at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), the Department of Agricultural Research and Human Resource Development (DARHRD) and other departments of the Ministry of Agriculture, the College of Agriculture of Asmara University, and other nonprofit development agencies. The CPWF project will contribute to enhancing food security and alleviating poverty for those who need it the most in the Atbara basin by strengthening agricultural research, seed and extension systems in the use of gender-sensitive participatory approaches to increasing crop water productivity, using low-cost inputs, while minimizing risk and ensuring sustainability of production.The research will be conducted utilizing the available indigenous knowledge. Farmers will be partners in technology development with extension and research, with full decision-making power in planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The technologies and management practices identified will be disseminated to nonparticipating farming communities. Community-based seed multiplication schemes will be promoted by establishing local enterprises and developing locally manufactured seed-processing facilities. The project will produce new varieties of cereals and food legumes, which have proven farmer acceptability, with associate management practices, in partnership with farmers; establish seed systems that supply farmers with quality seed in a sustainable manner; enhance farmers’ skills in participatory research and in community-based seed production; strengthen the capacity of national institutions to carry out participatory research and technology transfer, and to monitor and assess the impact of their research; strengthen linkages between research, seed and extension departments by working together in cooperation with farmers and farmer communities. The main beneficiaries of the material developed by the project will be the people living in the Atbara river basin in Eritrea. They will benefit from the new technologies. The research and extension staff will acquire increased capacity to conduct participatory research for crop improvement. The decision makers will use the results and the methodology of the project to extend it to other crops. Other IARC and NARES will be able to use the methodologies and the knowledge generated by the project. Eritrea      Crops, Water Management  Stefania Grando   
422 Sustaining Inclusive Collective Action That Links across Economic and Ecological Scales in Upper Watersheds (SCALES) Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical  2004-09-01  2008-06-30  The CPWF's SCALES project addresses the challenges of achieving and maintaining collective action in watersheds. The multiple, overlapping scales, and the ecological, economic, social and political asymmetries that typically characterize tropical watersheds substantially make it difficult to achieve cooperation around watershed management at anything but very local scale. Yet, high scale coordination and cooperation is essential to adequately address watershed problems.     The goal of this project was to make explicit the relationships between collective action, scale and poverty in a watershed context, and use the knowledge to develop solutions overcoming barriers and fostering equitable and sustainable management of watershed resources.     The identified relationships between poverty, scale and collective action in watersheds are extremely complex, both conceptually and empirically. There are some opportunities for improving welfare through better water management but many more potential trade-offs exist between poverty and the environment. Improving communication among different stakeholder improves cooperation around water management, according to experimental results. Upstream communities have an important role to play in initiating watershed dialogue because downstream people, both in the games and in reality, appear to have a deep distrust of upstream residents that limits their willingness to initiate cooperation, though not to reciprocate if upstream people make the first move. Action research in Colombia confirmed the potential of communication to improve collaboration, and demonstrates that it is possible to level the playing field and empower communities to engage with authorities around issues of resource management and rural development.     The project produced 8 scientific papers, 7 presentations and new methodology for economic experiments and a guide for implementing a multi-stakeholder training, negotiation and meeting process, (i.e. innovative methodology, the Conversatorio de Accion Ciudadana, CAC)       Colombia, Ethiopia      Ecosystem Management, Land Management, Water Management  Nancy Johnson   
426 Increased Food Security and Income in the Limpopo Basin through Integrated Crop, Water, and Soil Fertility Options and Public-Private Partnerships International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics  2005-01-01  2009-12-31  The biggest challenges facing smallholder farming communities in the Limpopo Basin of southern Africa are food insecurity, poverty and ill-health. Many parts of the basin are routinely food-deficient and rely on food aid. In the past two seasons there have been confirmed reports of starvation deaths in basin areas in both Zimbabwe and Mozambique. The basin’s local economies depend on rainfed agricultural systems characterized by low productivity, vulnerability to frequent drought (and sometimes devastating floods), poor adoption of improved technologies and diminishing farm labor due to out-migration and HIV/AIDS. This is exacerbated by poorly developed input and output markets.This project recognizes that subsistence agriculture alone will neither meet future food needs nor address the growing poverty problem in these drought-stricken environments. There is need to strengthen linkages through a systems approach that integrates improved water and soil management with varietal improvement, markets and other institutional arrangements which facilitate farmer investment in improved production practices. The CPWF's project goal is to improve food security, incomes and livelihoods of smallholder farmers in the Limpopo Basin. To achieve this goal, the project built on: past and current collaborative research by national programs and the CGIAR on crop-water productivity in drought-prone areas; innovative approaches to participatory technology development and extension; and new institutional arrangements that link the public and private sector with the smallholder farmer in appropriate market chains. The results from the activities include the following: • Farmers identified water management technologies that led to higher yield in dry environments through participatory on-farm trials and farmer access to seed of the identified improved cereal and legume varieties that mature early and thus escape terminal drought. Increased yield was observed in water use efficiency trials, variety trials, water harvesting trials and soil fertility (fertilizer use trials) • Farmers access to an assured market. The case of Progress Milling in the Limpopo Area of South Africa provided a learning point on the market driven technology adoption whereby farmers used fertilizer packs in different sizes on maize. This demonstrated to farmers that there was synergy of the resultant increased production and marketing of the surplus production. This new institutional arrangement led to a linkage of the public and private sector leading to greater uptake of technologies. This ensured sustainability of project outputs, and prevented agricultural resource degradation from nutrient mining and the exploitation of fragile lands. • At the end of the project, the major output has been the improved food security of the direct beneficiaries who reported increased yields and production from the adoption of the various technologies. The project, however, did not make major immediate impacts on non beneficiaries as these would only be achieved through an up-scaling phase of the proven technologies of project. Mozambique, South Africa, Zimbabwe      Crops, Water Management  Moses Siambi   
419 Improved Planning of Large Dam Operation: Using Decision Support Systems to Optimize Livelihood Benefits, Safeguard Health and Protect the Environment International Water Management Institute  2005-01-01  2009-12-31  Large dams bring the challenges of sustainable development, and specifically integrated water resources management, to the fore. By storing water, and so increasing options for water management, large dams have brought broad social and economic benefits and have made significant contributions to national and regional development. However, history shows that dams can have profound social and economic repercussions for those, invariably poor, people living close to or downstream from them. Such communities often have limited livelihood options and so are particularly vulnerable to changes in the condition of the natural resources on which they depend. Too often in the past the adverse impacts experienced by the